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The Rage Against God: How Atheism Led Me to Faith [Kindle Edition]

Peter Hitchens
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (115 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $14.99
Kindle Price: $5.98
You Save: $9.01 (60%)
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishing

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Book Description

Here, for the first time, in his new book The Rage Against God, Peter Hitchens, brother of prominent atheist Christopher Hitchens, chronicles his personal journey through disbelief into a committed Christian faith. With unflinching openness and intellectual honesty, Hitchens describes the personal loss and philosophical curiosity that led him to burn his Bible at prep school and embrace atheism in its place. From there, he traces his experience as a journalist in Soviet Moscow, and the critical observations that left him with more questions than answers, and more despair than hope for how to live a meaningful life.

With first-hand insight into the blurring of the line between politics and the Church, Hitchens reveals the reasons why an honest assessment of Atheism cannot sustain disbelief in God. In the process, he provides hope for all believers who, in the words of T. S. Eliot, may discover “the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.”


Editorial Reviews

Review

'The two best-written books [of 2010] were Christopher Hitchens's memoir Hitch 22 and his brother Peter's The Rage Against God.' -- Michael Gove <br><br>

About the Author

Peter Hitchens is a British journalist, author, and broadcaster. He currently writes for the Mail on Sunday, where he is a columnist and occasional foreign correspondent, reporting most recently from Iran, North Korea, Burma, The Congo, and China. A former revolutionary, he attributes his return to faith largely to his experience of socialism in practice, which he witnessed during his many years reporting in Eastern Europe and his nearly three years as a resident correspondent in Moscow during the collapse of the Soviet Union. He lived and worked in the United States from 1993 to 1995. Hitchens lives in Oxford with his wife, Eve. They have three children.

Product Details

  • File Size: 397 KB
  • Print Length: 225 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0310320313
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 5 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Zondervan (June 1, 2010)
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishing
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003EUGFY8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #77,075 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
188 of 201 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I was attracted to read this book because of my familiarity with Peter Hitchens and his brother Christopher Hitchens. Both have become public intellectuals of varying degree. And both, as it turns out, have books being released this summer. I was excited when I got the opportunity to read this book, so provocatively titled "The Rage Against God."

This book is very much a testimonial (and an apologetic as well) of a man's life lived in the rapidly changing Britain (and West) of the post-WWII ear through today. Hitchens description of the Britain of his youth is accurate in the narrative of a nation that has slowly ossified and changed from what was a person living in Great Britain would have known prior to WWI. The public confidence in British institutions has greatly changed (witness the wrangling over Princess Diana's death by Queen Elizabeth II, for example) The relevance of Christian life in public life that was common-place and expected, whether at Christmas time or Easter was unquestioned. Hitchens describes how these touchstones have rapidly disappeared to the point where public pronouncements of religious faith are mocked and shunned to the extent that expression becomes an oddity. Witness the Church Of England abandoning so much of the liturgy that was known prior to WWII by almost all Brits. Today, even Biblical history is rapidly disappearing from public life.

Hitchens goes on to make three counterpoints of common lodestars of what non-believers argue as reasons for abandoning faith: religious faith causes conflict, moral relativism and atheism in nation/states. Finally, Hitchens goes on to debate the arguments of how the alternative to the "Christian" state, i.e.
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113 of 125 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected May 5, 2010
Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Peter Hitchen's book The Rage Against God wasn't what I expected, namely a blow-by-blow critique of atheism and a listing of reasons for the existence of God. Instead, the brother of noted atheist Christopher Hitchens writes an engaging memoir of his personal journey, followed by his appraisal of atheistic regimes and ideologies, along with a reminder of atrocities carried out in the name (alone) of religions that were, at the core, irreligious--and why. I'm reminded of a quote, "When people act contrary to their religion, you blame them, not their religion." Christianity doesn't escape unscathed, but Hitchens is clear to point out that unchristian acts occur when God's moral will is disregarded. A clever quote: "Faith has often led to cruel violence and intolerant persecution...this is not because they are religious, but because Man is not great" (153). I would still like to know why totalitarian governments feel so threatened by religion. In an enlightened age ought not tolerance prevail? (by tolerance, I mean accepting people who hold views you firmly believe are incorrect) The chapter on moral absolutes was helpful, and (another quote not in the book) I recall Dostoyevsky, "If there is no God, anything is permissible." If there is no God, all we're really left with are arbitrary preferences. This has an appeal to those who covet autonomy and freedom from higher authority...yet atheists probably do not want to be labeled amoral. Hitchen's appraisal of atheism made me wonder if an atheist would claim that the world merely has the "appearance" of purpose. Also, the section on religious instruction could have mentioned that most Christians do not "force-feed" the Bible to children. They want kids to be able to think, and not blindly accept religious teaching. His approach won't appeal to everyone (particularly his famous brother), but is a worthy and readable addition to the ongoing debate.
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107 of 129 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I ordered this book because I wanted to know the back-story of Christopher Hitchens. I've always been intrigued by how such a sharp mind could have such fallacious thinking and conclusions. I was surprised to learn that Christopher has a brother that is an avid believer. "The Rage Against God" was a fascinating glimpse into the lives of the Hitchens family, as well as a easy to read study of atheism and it's historical underpinnings in England.

Hitchens makes the point that atheism is more a result of the spirit of the age than the mask of intellectualism atheists claim. That in-fact the road atheists travel is more of a mental straight jacket that leads them to nihilism. Hitchens strongly documents and reveals the historical path Atheism has taken; that in reality Atheism is religious cult of its own that has its mooring on principles every bit as subjective and faith based as any authentic religion.

Frankly this book is disturbing - making all the more reason to read it. This book is Ecclesiastics writ large; lived once again in our century. Hitchens documents the path Jean-Jacques Rousseau and The Enlightenment takes man. Atheists become militant because they are so unhappy. This book is thoroughly enjoyable and insightful. It is devastating to Christopher's arguments and very useful if you have to debate atheists in any forum. I particularly liked learning why politicians are so keen to eliminate faith and where that takes a nation. Reading this book will give you a behind the curtain look at England (surprising Yanks like me), the Hitchens family, and Atheism.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
It was informative with respect to the reasons for Peter Hitchen's conversion.
Published 4 days ago by Casimir J. Bonk
5.0 out of 5 stars ... I haven't read the Kindle version yet but I enjoyed listening to...
I must admit that I haven't read the Kindle version yet but I enjoyed listening to the audiobook by audible.com.
Published 20 days ago by J. Manley
3.0 out of 5 stars 3 1/2
A v.good essay...

Quick delivery!!

Thanks,
Published 21 days ago by J. P. McNellie
4.0 out of 5 stars New Atheist's Brother Writes book about God
While this book is very well written it was not the best book to rebut the New Atheist arguments. While his back story (part 1) and rebutting of his brother's (Christopher... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Jrob17
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant response for militant atheism and anti-theism!
Peter Hitchens' The Rage Against God is a powerful and compelling read. Firstly, this book is not a Christian apologetic: it does not attempt to sway the reader into a conversion... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Darren Mellowship
4.0 out of 5 stars My son is pulling away from his faith...thought I would see what...
Enjoyed reading...especially the later chapters. The later chapters got into the subject matter I really wanted, which was why he left his christian upbringing and what drew him... Read more
Published 2 months ago by JGMGT
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful, honest, sensitive and thought provoking
I read this book and found it to be quite an insightful, honest and sensitive sharing of this man's life and path to faith. Read more
Published 2 months ago by D. Hellwig
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful
Very insightful for the "average" believer; shows the reasons to believe from a personal perspective but also from a cultural/ historical perspective. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Timothy E. McDevitt
1.0 out of 5 stars A Rage against Communism, full of straw man arguments
I had high hopes for Christopher Hitchens' brother.

If nothing else, I expected some kind of unique approach to the faith vs atheism argument. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Karol Gajda
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent insights
Peter Hitchens said so many things so well that I found myself highlighting many passages to quote them later when I want to sound erudite. Read more
Published 3 months ago by Roland Earnst
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More About the Author

Peter Hitchens is a British journalist, author, and broadcaster. He currently writes for the Mail on Sunday, where he is a columnist and occasional foreign correspondent, reporting most recently from Iran, North Korea, Burma, The Congo, and China. A former revolutionary, he attributes his return to faith largely to his experience of socialism in practice, which he witnessed during his many years reporting in Eastern Europe and his nearly three years as a resident correspondent in Moscow during the collapse of the Soviet Union. He lived and worked in the United States from 1993 to 1995. Hitchens lives in Oxford with his wife, Eve. They have three children.

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