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The Railway Children Paperback – October 30, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 150 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (October 30, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 146634783X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466347830
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,361,049 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-7-This dramatic adaptation of the 1906 classic by E. Nesbit is read by an ensemble cast of four actors. They read with conviction and help the story come alive. The story is told from the monster's point of view, a more immediate and engaging way than Nesbit's use of a narrator. It presents a loving family of three children who pull closer to their mother after their father mysteriously disappears one evening after dinner. The family is forced to move from their rather posh home in the city to a simple one in the country, and often have to "make due." The railway plays an important part in their lives. The adaptation includes all of the major events in the book, and there is a smooth transition from one adventure to another. Minor characters are foils against which the family reacts and there is no real character development, more just a series of incidents and coincidences building to the father's return. This is a comforting version for fans of Nesbit, and one that will attract new converts.
Edith Ching, St. Albans School, Washington, DC
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Her child characters were remarkable in her day because they are so entirely human. They are intelligent, vain, aggressive, humorous, witty, cruel, compassionate... in fact, they are like adults." --Gore Vidal

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Customer Reviews

I read this book aloud to my son (age 5) and he loved it.
Lisa/Edkela
The story's ending is actually very moving in its simple way.
kennedy19
Great book to read to or with your children,or grandchildren.
Sharon J. Wood

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By stephanie on June 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading this book with ten rising fifth graders. It was a "stretch read" for most of the children because the text is heavily colored by the time period, language, and general style. BUT! This was a very worhty read. Each chapter reads similarily to a short story in that there is an adventure, resolution, and moral to the story. The students responded positively to the daily challenge of the chapter length, the sophisticated language, and the romanticism of the setting. This was a very good choice for us. As a mother and a teacher--I recommed this novel enthusiastically!
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Reader on September 8, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I love this story and have it on video. But because it a Kindle version the lists the children made were missing. Also missing from the book were the words on the signs they made. I am sure this is because they are pictures and no pictures were downloaded, but I wished I was reading a print version of the book. Usually I never miss a print version, but when things are missing - I do.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By S. Spahr on April 23, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This a story of a family who move to the country during the absence of the husband and father. The children are left to their own devices as Mother writes stories to support them. The children are fascinated by a nearby railway line and station and through these make interesting friends and have exciting adventures. A most satisfying read!
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By kennedy19 on December 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
It would be tempting these days to dismiss Nesbit's Edwardian chestnut as sappy and sentimental; however, upon rereading it, I find this is simply not the case. Sure, there is innocent charm aplenty in this tale of three children whose father is mysteriously called away. The family (Roberta, the eldest girl and main character, Peter, and Phyllis) go with their mother to live in the country, and while mother tries to make ends meet by writing stories, the children explore the area, make friends with people at the train station and on the passing train, and involve themselves in a couple of daring rescues. Each chapter is like its own little adventure, but always there lingers the question of where has father gone, and how will the family pull through its crisis. Sunny the author's outlook may be, but it is not sentimental, as evidenced when the children throw a surprise party for Perks the porter and he is angered rather than glad, fearing they do it our of charity. The children fight amongst themselves, and worry, and fret, like real children of that or any era might. Throughout the story, the reader comes to enjoy this country town and its cast of ordinary but amusing characters. The story's ending is actually very moving in its simple way. A classic.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. C. Steudl on November 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I give this book 100 sets of five stars. It is a classic, it is refreshingly innocent, imaginative, constant in it's expression of human nature, and absolutely delightful. I recommend this book to children of reading age who need to see how wonderful the simple life can be. And for adults who need a corner of a soft chair, a warm fire, and a cup of hot tea, and a reminder of the sweetness of innocence and heroism and love of family.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "favoritebooks" on March 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is an exceptional book about 3 children who live near a railroad and thoroughly enjoy it.. They live and let live until one day their relatively ordinary lives come to a screeching halt as it did when their father went away. They are friendly with an old man who helps them find out the mystery of their father's abrupt disappearance. They finally get the family back together and the live happily ever after etc. etc. etc. Though this may seem common and uninteresting, there is some other force that made me sit up late into the night to finish the book. You may understand why I did that when you read the book. It is very enjoyable, (but that may be because I am a child) and I thoroughly recommend it to children . Enjoy! Cheers!!!!!!!!! : )
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Plume45 on May 3, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Three English children in turn-of-the-century London are suddenly obliged to leave their home and take up rural residence at Three Chimneys cottage. They are additionally confused by the unexplained disappearance of their father, who was falsely accused of espionage and wrongfully incarcerated. The kids seek solace in their new life by becoming familiar with unexplored means of transportation: the canal and the railroad.
Their plucky mother undertakes to write novels while she homeschools her inquisitive offspring: 12-year-old Roberta (Bobbie), 10-year-old Peter, and 7-year-old Phyllis. These children quarrel and squabble, play and dream like normal kids, while secretly harboring fears about their absent father. Could he be dead, since no one was allowed to inform them of the painful truth? Would their calm, loving mother permit them to live a lie?
During the next 6 months these decent kids gradually carve out a niche for themsleves in the lives (and ultimately the hearts) of the local citizens--particularly railway personnel. As they expand their social horizons, they increase their knowledge of the ways and quirks of the iron horse. They even learn lessons in tasteful charity and Christian compassion, as they exist in a kind of emotional limbo--just waiting for some unknown event.
Despite Nesbit's admittedly quaint literary style (with many asides addresesd to the reader, and obvious predilection for one of her characters), THE RAILWAY CHILDREN will transport readers back to a much simpler time--an era of true family values and homespun social virtues. Don't expect the fantasy elements of THE PHOENIX AND THE CARPET in this gentle story; just relax and enjoy a journey into the past, when chidren were taught to wait and hope. This is a book for children of all ages, inscribed on the tablets of Home and Hearth. And who is the mysterious but kindly old gentleman on their beloved Green Dragon?
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