The Raven 2012 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(471) IMDb 6.4/10
Available in HD
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A brutal killing spree terrorizes 19th-century Baltimore and a young detective turns to notorious author Edgar Allan Poe for help getting inside the mind of a serial killer.

Starring:
John Cusack, Luke Evans
Runtime:
1 hour 51 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

The Raven

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, Mystery
Director James McTeigue
Starring John Cusack, Luke Evans
Supporting actors Alice Eve, Brendan Gleeson, Kevin McNally, Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Jimmy Yuill, Sam Hazeldine, Pam Ferris, Brendan Coyle, Adrian Rawlins, Aidan Feore, Dave Legeno, Michael Cronin, Michael Poole, Michael Shannon, Charity Wakefield, John Warnaby, Matt Slack, Ian Virgo
Studio Relativity Media, LLC
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Good plot, great suspense and touching acting.
Olldashi
There is just so much material there, I just do not think this movie really made anything all that interesting out of it.
Brian C.
The characters were poorly developed, the story was thin and the plot lines were too implausible.
Father Narac

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

87 of 100 people found the following review helpful By Jym Cherry on April 27, 2012
Format: DVD
On October 3, 1849 Edgar Allan Poe was found wandering the streets of Baltimore, delirious, calling out the name Reynolds. There have been lots of theories as to what Poe died of, from tuberculosis, rabies or to a drunken bender. "The Raven" puts forth a more romantic theory and a detective story for the man who invented the modern detective novel.

"The Raven" as a movie demonstrates that you can make a movie that bridges the biographical facts of Poe's life and its own artistic vision and still make an interesting movie. The movie is driven by the premise, a serial killer starts a series of killings in Baltimore that emulate some of the more gruesome murders in Poe's stories. When the first murder is done inside a locked room, police detective Fields (Luke Evans) recognizes it as the setting of an Edgar Allan Poe story. Fields brings in Poe (John Cusack) at first as suspect, but when another murder occurs Poe quickly becomes the first criminal profiler and consultant. Poe helps Fields both in what kind of mind the killer may have and of course in the details from his stories. The killer kidnaps Poe's girlfriend Emily (Alice Eve) with the killer promising clues as to Emily's whereabouts with each new murder he commits.

The filmmakers, director James McTeigue and writers Ben Livingstone and Hannah Shakespeare don't try to recast Poe's character as a superhero or give the movie Poe attributes that the real Poe didn't or couldn't possess. As mentioned before, the filmmakers stick fairly accurately to the known elements of Poe's last few days, although there are some artistic liberties taken, and they still present an entertaining movie with a few twists and turns as to who the murderer is.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Patricia on October 10, 2012
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
As much as I am a fan of Cusack movies, I am an even bigger fan of all things POE, so I was really concerned about this being done without any integrity and too many liberties being taken, but that was not the case. Overall, the movie was done really well. I really enjoyed it. They didn't take any outlandish liberties with Poe or his work, so it all worked well together for this lover of Poe.
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38 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Joseph P. Menta, Jr. VINE VOICE on May 1, 2012
Format: DVD
"The Raven", a fictional horror thriller featuring the non-fictional literary figure Edgar Allan Poe, was well crafted and never less than adequately watchable, but I really expected more. While calling the film cartoony and childish would be way too critical, I thought there was a broadness and simplicity to the proceedings that made the movie veer away from some potentially very interesting waters.

I'm just thinking aloud here, but I would have loved to see a fictional Poe film set in the months prior to his death in 1849, one that made a genuine attempt at showing viewers what Poe was like, what demons bedeviled him, that sort of thing. The device of the fictional detective story involving Poe could have illuminated the non-fictional aspects of his life, aspects that contributed to his tragic, premature death.

But, no, here we get a sanitized, generally likable Poe with only the barest nods to the man's excesses, depression, and hardships. To be fair here, the film at least mentions that Poe lost his young wife to tuberculosis and that the tragedy still haunted him. But not all that much, according to this movie. There also isn't much grittiness or realism in the depiction of Baltimore in 1849, even though numerous crime scenes in bad parts of town are depicted. There was more moody darkness in the Robert Downey Jr. "Sherlock Holmes" movies.

Finally, worse than the broadness evident in the depictions of characters and locations, the movie didn't even give poor Poe the dignity of his inherent flaws when it came to his death. In other words, flattering or not, Poe's demons and weaknesses were part of who he was and why he died, and that should have been shown in the movie.
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34 of 40 people found the following review helpful By MandyKay on April 29, 2012
Format: DVD
All of the actors in this do an excellent job!
The story was really interesting, even though I didn't know very much about Edgar Allen Poe to start with.
The movie keeps you guessing through the entire thing. Great story line with great twists and turns.
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33 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Angelina de Mourier on April 28, 2012
Format: DVD
Today, I went to see "The Raven," a mystery thriller set in 1849, the actual time Edgar Allan Poe lived, my January 19th born master of macabre poetry, (though if one were to read his real-life quotes, one would be astonished as to witness such love; "We loved with a love that is more than love.") He died, rather mysteriously, at age 40.

What Director James McTeigue aspired to do was brilliantly accomplished, in this epic work of mystery which incorporates the actual life of Poe with fiction.

Phenomenal achievement, really, as to lace them, ohhh, so integrally. I salute him, as Poe would have done in his days at West Point, which were mentioned in the movie along with his two loves; first his young cousin of a wife who died of Tuberculosis, first signs truly evident at the piano, as mentioned, and the other love, of his sweetheart, Sarah Elmira Royster. The $9 he was paid for his first publication was incited, his disdain for Longfellow, as well as a myriad of his actual prose of known works from, "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" all the way to "Annabel Lee"...which brought the killer into the labyrinth of the fiction element of this film. My heavens, they even included the last publicly known words of Poe, "Lord, help my poor soul."

John Cusack's performance was EXPLOSIVE! And his lines of the time I cherish so, were perfectly articulated with the passion they should be!

And not too many present-day special effects, except a close-up of a slow-moving bullet, which was actually a fabulous adornment.

C'est Magnifique is all I can say of this movie...of course I did close my eyes to the more bloody scenes, which flitted as fireflies on a summers night. So be it.
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