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The Raven Warrior: The Tales of Guinevere Mass Market Paperback – August 31, 2004


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (August 31, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345444027
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345444028
  • Product Dimensions: 4 x 1.1 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,515,502 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

With the knowing eye and fiery voice of an accomplished storyteller, Alice Borchardt takes us back to the amazing world of a re-envisioned Camelot in the continuing Tales of Guinevere. Remarkably strong, magically talented, a match for friend and foe alike, Guinevere has come into womanhood—and faces a new relationship with Lancelot that will lead to the sharp-edged triangle of legend. . . .

Born of the Highlands, along Pictish shores washed by the icy North Sea, Guinevere, Queen of the Dragon People, has become a woman. She has taken the power offered to her by the Dragon Throne. Now there is no turning back. In order to protect her beloved homeland from the obscene greed of the Saxon raiders, Guinevere knows she must launch an attack. The sub-chiefs refuse to fall in line with her plans (because what does this young thing, barely a woman, know of warfare?) and give her an army of the useless, the outcast, the weakest of their young boys and girls. But the war party must proceed. If it fails, the command of both land and sea will fall to the enemy.

Facing her first battle against the pirates on foreign shores, and backed only by a meager band of ill-equipped fighters, Guinevere calls upon the spirits of the dead to aid her in the attack. Diving into the dark, morbid depths, Guinevere suddenly understands more of hate, love, anger, and revenge than she has ever wanted to. But the power the dead provide comes at a severe price. If she makes it through the raid, she will be a changed woman, in more ways than she can possibly imagine.

Further south, Black Leg, her childhood companion, sets out on his own. It is a quest to become a man—a man, he hopes, who will be worthy of the newly crowned Guinevere. A shapeshifter and the son of Guinevere's adoptive man-wolf father, Black Leg (soon to be Lancelot) feels he has much to learn—and even more to prove. He discovers both his inner strength and an unmitigated passion when he meets the Lady of the Lake. But the trials of his journey— both mental and physical—turn out to be more perilous with each step. And when Lancelot and Guinevere are finally reunited, the consequences of both their ordeals will unleash a torrent of anguish and desire.

With familiar names brilliantly repositioned for a new generation of Arthurian fans—evil Merlin, conniving Igrane, complex Lancelot, tainted Arthur, and of course, warrior Guinevere—Alice Borchardt's creation stands as a testament to the power of imagination.


From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Alice Borchardt shared a childhood of storytelling with her sister, Anne Rice, in New Orleans. A professional nurse, she has also nurtured a profound interest in little-known periods of history. She is the author of Devoted, Beguiled, The Silver Wolf, Night of the Wolf, The Wolf King, and The Dragon Queen. She lives in Houston.


From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

I can't wait for the next book in the series to come out!
A. Nolte
The story was interesting but poor writing with unnecessary details at times, not enough details at other times and many, many misspelled words hindered it.
A. Wilson
In short by the time I got to the end of the book I didn't feel I had been taken anywhere.
C. J. Fullmer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By H. M. gallagher on May 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Lurid, disjointed, unfulfilling...Her Wolf books are interesting and Dragon Queen was written well enough that I bought Raven in hardback, but this book is a bit offensive. She uses sex as filler and her use of modern language sets the wrong tone and jangles the nerves. Some sequences in the book are interesting, but most are too dreamlike to make sense or just plain stupid, ie the big cat talking and licking himself, etc...
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sfasm Taw Sbasa on August 11, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I loved The Dragon Queen, but this book has really confused me, there are so many different people with all different adventures that it gets really muddled up. Sometimes, I don't even know how the character got to a certain place and I thought I had missed something, so I go back and check, but still if confuses me. Some of the things like the "War Song" I have no idea what it is.... maybe more decription in parts of the story and less in others? That may help!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M TOP 1000 REVIEWER on February 7, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After reading Dragon Queen, I was disappointed by this book. There's some awesome parts, but like in her other books, I notice that she has the tendency to sometimes focus and expand unimportant scenes (or scenes which don't really have anything to do with the main plot) while briefly describing more important and relevant ones.

I found Guinevere's journey to the other world to be boring and unneccessary. Sure, she's supposed to gain allies and stuff, but this part of the book would have been more enjoyable if Ms. Borchardt spent as much time fleshing out her relevant scenes as she did the filler scenes. I mean, this book honestly was more filler than plot, so by the end of the book I felt terribly let down and disappointed, since it didn't really feel as if anything was resolved. Yeah, the scenes were beautifully described and it was easy to imagine the surroundings, but at times, I found myself growing very impatient with the plodding and disorganized plot.

Sadly, we will never know what happens, because Ms. Borchardt died before she could finish the third book. Given the disjointed quality of the first two books of this Guinevere trilogy, perhaps we're better off drawing our own conclusions as to what happens to Arthur and Guinevere.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Susan J. Mercer on July 14, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I found The Dragon Queen at my local library and enjoyed reading it very much. I then picked up The Raven Warrior and although I made it through the book, I was disappointed in the modern dialogue that permeated the book. I will probably read the third book when it comes out, but hope she focuses on the action rather than the attempts to be witty, which are totally inappropriate for this genre of book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Wilson on November 12, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Usually when I read Alice Borchardt's books I read them within a day or two unable to put the book down. This book took over a week for me to read. The story was interesting but poor writing with unnecessary details at times, not enough details at other times and many, many misspelled words hindered it. The author frequently gave details about the main characters, environments, and backdrop characters that did not pertain to the plot of the story, character development or scenery. This ultimately hindered my comprehension of the story.
This story tells five peoples' tales at once (Guinevere, Arthur, Lancelot, Uther and Igrane). Each person's story had transitions I was unable to follow. For example, a person would leave one place and go to the next. It was difficult at times to figure out how and when the person went to the next place and how they got to that place. So, I would logically conclude I had skipped something and go back and read it over again finding that I didn't miss one thing. Alice Borchardt didn't inform us how the transition occurred.
I have read all of Alice Borchardt's works and I enjoyed each one. This book makes me wonder. I wonder if there was an editor for this book. I wonder if Alice Borchadt was under a time crunch or had a personal misfortune occur while writing this book. I wonder if all her other books were as poorly written as this one. While I have given plenty of negative feedback, I believe the actual story once you get past the bad writing was excellent. I was sad that it was such a difficult read.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By TD on June 5, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was an incredibly disappointing and silly book! I recently picked up "The Dragon Queen" at the library and found it to be a nice addition to all the Guinevere-Arthur-Merlin genre (which - I have to admit - I am a real sucker for - and hence why I continued to read this book after the first 50 pages). Unfortunately, I have to agree with most of the other reviews about "The Raven Warrior" - this book is choppy, confusing, filled w/ ridiculous fantastical events and over-the-top silly sex scenes, not to mention bland language & meandering stories. Because she skipped around so much from character to character, and because she was following too many characters, it was easy to get lost as to the many story lines. If you're expecting a continuation of The Dragon Queen, this book does not provide it. Instead, the writing seems to be almost totally unrelated to the stories/characters in that book. I've never read a Harlequin romance, but I would imagine some scenes to be comparable in depth and substance. There were times when I felt embarrassed both for (a) myself for actually reading the book & (b) for the author for putting pen to paper!!!! I can't help but wonder why Borchardt felt she had to embellish this novel so outrageously. Perhaps she decided to follow her sister's writing style (Rice's Vampire Chronicles - which I've never read)? Whatever she was thinking, it was really a failure. Where were her editors?
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