Buy Used
$7.89
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Clean copy with light wear. Has light wear on the cover, edges and corners. Binding is tight. Pages are clean. This item ships promptly from Amazon's warehouse with tracking, 24/7 customer service, and no-hassle returns. Eligible for Amazon's Free Super Saver Shipping and Prime programs.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Raw 50: 10 Amazing Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinners, Snacks, and Drinks for Your Raw Food Lifestyle Paperback – July 3, 2007


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$3.49 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Clarkson Potter; 1 edition (July 3, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307351742
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307351746
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #196,095 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

For more than two decades, Carol Alt has been one of the world’s most recognizable names and faces. In addition to being the first American to be the face of Lancôme and gracing the cover of more than 700 magazines, she has made calendars, posters, and exercise videos, all of which have sold millions of copies. An accomplished spokesperson and frequent guest on talk shows, she has acted on stage and television and in more than 65 movies. Visit her website www.carolalt.com.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

50 staples

Before I get to the recipes themselves, I want to outline the Raw 50 staples, and the steps you can take so you’re ready to make raw meals. There is information on outfitting your raw kitchen and a raw staples shopping list. Certain raw skills are necessary, like sprouting and germinating seeds, and I go into them here. I also go through and describe commonly used raw ingredients like raw dairy products, water, kefir, salt, natural sweeteners, miso, flax seeds, fruits, oils, and raw preserves so you’re all set up and good to go. I also give my personal answer to the question Vegan or not?



Outfitting the Raw Kitchen

I remember my mother’s kitchen. There were pots and pans to cook in, lidded glass casserole dishes to use in the oven, and lots of Tupperware for leftovers. On the countertop was a toaster, right beside the blender.

Well, at least I still use a blender.

Over time, our kitchens become the place where all sorts of gizmos and gadgets accumulate. If you've been cooking for even a few years, look around your kitchen and you’re sure to find appliances and utensils you rarely use, tucked away in a cabinet or taking up space on a countertop. Now is your chance to replace them with something new, something you’ll actually use.

Doing away with cooking means doing away with many things: toasters, microwaves, even pots and pans. I use my stove to heat water for tea. I don’t really need my oven at all. You may have a well-outfitted kitchen for cooking, but there are a few things you probably don’t have that you’ll want to invest in if you’re going to be preparing your own raw food.

Here are the key pieces of equipment you’ll need:

Blender

There are blenders, and then there are blenders. I remember the flimsy one my mother used, and I have destroyed many of my own over the years. But since blending is a cornerstone of raw-food preparation, you can’t make a better investment than purchasing a nearly indestructible, top-notch blender. I have two favorites: the Vita-Mix or Jack LaLanne blender.

Juicer

When I wrote Eating in the Raw, I didn’t even own a juicer. My favorite drinks were the smoothies I made in my Vita-Mix and those I bought from the juice bars throughout New York City. At the time, I thought it was just easier to let someone else blend fruits and vegetables into sumptuous, savory, nutritious drinks. When I bought my juice at the juice bar, though, I had no choice but to drink it right away; juices start to oxidize as soon as they’re exposed to air. In as little as twenty minutes they can lose most of their nutrition. It’s a case of diminishing returns: the longer you wait to drink them, the less nutritious juices become. Having my own juicer would assure me of fresh, more nutritious juice right when I want it. But the juicers I had heard about and seen in use cost a small fortune!

Then I learned about Jack LaLanne Power Juicers. Now I’m hooked. This juicer does everything the $500 and $600 juicers do for less than $100, so this is an investment definitely worth making.

Dehydrator

The dehydrator is to a raw foodist what the oven is to Betty Crocker. Yes, you can get by without one, but so many of the really incredible things you may want to make—from fresh fruit preserves to breads—call for a dehydrator. If you don’t want to shell out for the versatile top-of-the-line Excalibur, buy a cheaper one with a reliable thermostat to start. You’ll find reasonably priced dehydrators, as well as the Excalibur, on CarolAlt.com. Do look for some extra Teflex sheets too (in addition to the one that comes with your dehydrator). Teflex is a nonstick material used like wax paper, which keeps your dehydrating foods from dripping through the dehydrator shelves. A necessity when making preserves or cookies!

Coffee Grinder

No, this isn’t so you can have fresh-ground coffee as you ponder The Raw 50. A blender as powerful as the Vita-Mix is too big for many small chopping or grinding jobs. Whether you’re grinding nuts or a dry, raw cheese, the best and cheapest tool I know is an inexpensive electric coffee grinder.

Instant-Read Thermometer

Not everything raw has to be cold, but when you do warm food, you don’t want it to get too hot. This handy device will help you keep things warm but less than 115 degrees F so that the enzymes won’t be compromised.

Spiral Slicer

I said it once and I’ll say it again: if there has ever been an appliance that is worth every cent, this is it! Spiral slicers (also called “spiralizers”) are sold for as little as $20. Why is this such a handy tool? It takes vegetables and cuts them into a spiral shape that is perfect for special treats like raw pasta!

Mandoline

You can easily get by without one, but a mandoline slicer makes cutting vegetables into very thin slices easier and a lot faster than doing it by hand. They are available at a wide variety of price points; see CarolAlt.com for several good options.

Vacuum Storage System (VacSy)

Unless you eat everything you make right away, this is an appliance you will definitely want to invest in. I couldn’t live without my VacSy. Its glass containers are unique. They not only store food, but also, with the help of their small, handheld vacuum pump, allow you to suck the air out, creating an oxygen-free environment that preserves your leftovers. You can get it through CarolAlt.com.

Other Odds and Ends

Most of the other accessories you’ll need for your raw kitchen are likely already there. If you don’t have canning jars and cheesecloth (or a stocking!) for germinating and sprouting, you should probably get some.

Your Raw Staples Shopping List

When I was growing up, you were sure to find milk, eggs, bread, sugar, flour, butter, and OJ in our kitchen as well as Tab, my mother’s favorite soft drink, boxes of sugary breakfast cereal, and Oreo cookies. Today my shopping list looks very different, fortunately.

You have to cover the basics. And the sooner you get used to shopping for raw staples, the easier sticking to a raw diet becomes. Keep in mind that fresh, living foods naturally perish more quickly than cooked, processed ones, so shop for produce often and conservatively to avoid spoilage.

Most important, always remember to read labels. You want raw products, not their cooked counterparts. Labeling can be vague or even deceptive, and unless you see the word “raw” or an equivalent —“unpasteurized,” or “cold-pressed,” for example—chances are it is not raw. And always get organic if you can.

You should be able to get everything on the following pages at a natural foods supermarket such as Wild Oats or Whole Foods. For certain items you may need to visit a good health-food store or check out an online resource or my website. If you’re vegan, you will skip some items on the list—honey, for example.

Raw Dairy Products

Have you ever wondered if small dairy farmers go down to the local supermarket to buy pasteurized milk? Guess what? They don’t. They get theirs fresh from the source.

There was a time when pasteurizing dairy products, a process that involves heating them to between 175 and 212 degrees F, made sense. A hundred years ago we didn’t have reliable refrigeration or affordable vacuum sealing to keep things from spoiling in transit. Those days are long past, but old habits die hard. Go into any supermarket and just about everything in the dairy section will have the word “pasteurized” on it—as if it’s something to boast about. Not to me it isn’t!

Those who make real dairy products take pride in the fact that their milk and cheeses still contain all the wonderful nutrients that God intended. Their enzymes are intact. They are real dairy and they are raw.

I love unpasteurized milk, but I don’t stop there in my search for raw dairy foods. Supermarkets with large cheese selections often offer some raw cheeses. The person behind the counter should know which cheeses are made from raw milk. At Whole Foods, for example, there is usually someone who knows enough about cheeses to ask you if you want soft, medium, or hard cheese, and if you have a preference for cow’s, goat’s, or sheep’s milk. Better yet, they will let you taste what they have.

If you like Manchego or Emmentaler cheese, for example, ask for “raw- milk” Manchego or Emmentaler.

Each state regulates the sale of raw dairy products differently. In some places you are not allowed to buy raw milk, yet across the state line it is readily available. In Pennsylvania, where raw dairy is legally available, you can find fresh raw milk and cream at many farm stands and health-food stores and raw-milk cheeses in supermarkets. But there is a restriction on unpasteurized butter, which must be sold “for animal consumption” only. Of course, the same sanitation standards are followed in making butter as in making cheese so, since I’m an animal, I don’t hesitate to buy and consume fresh traditional, Mennonite-made butter.

For raw foodists everywhere who want raw dairy products, the Internet is a Godsend. These days, you can get just about anything shipped overnight, and the high-quality standards that producers of organic, raw dairy products adhere to make these products quite safe. Still, if you can buy locally, do! If you can’t, check on the Internet for sources of raw dairy products.

Two more things: You assume the responsibility for the shipment of the raw dairy, and if it gets lost en route and goes bad, it is all yours! The shelf life of raw dairy is relatively short, and the shipper doesn’t assume the responsibility for freshness; you are really buying at your own risk. When ...

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Loved the recipes - those I've tried to far.
Susanne M. Haenisch
I fully recommend this book to anyone interested in incorporating more raw into their diet.
Penni Shelton
I'm sorry I purchased this book so my money could go towards someone like this!
C. Miller

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Kirsten M. Houseknecht on January 4, 2008
Format: Paperback
Yes, this book includes a Raw Food Brownie recipe. The texture is variable, depending on your kitchen equipment, and the taste isn't precisely right, but its DARN good. To be truthful, i bought this book for the brownie recipe.

This book contains basic information you will need to start your raw food life, including the basics of sprouting, soaking, making nut milks, and so on. It includes most of the information from her other book "Eating in the Raw" in a condensed form. It also has far more recipes, and fewer testimonials and "how i got here" stories.

some of her recipes call for a food dehydrator, or serious prep time (a common problem with the higher end Raw food recipes) but there are many items in this book that can be made with no equipment of note, or a blender alone.

The Juices and smoothies section is excellent, if basic for someone who is experienced in Raw Food living. The recipes are clear and do not assume a great deal of expert knowledge. Most of the main course type recipes are for items that replicate cooked foods, like mock lasagna, and this is true of her desert recipes as well.

The book has an extraordinarily high number of deserts and mock "cooked" meals that are still within the capabilities of a typical raw food beginner, and may be especially helpful to someone trying to make dishes that won't scare off the more conventional eaters in a family.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Penni Shelton on January 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
Carol Alt's first book, Eating In The Raw, was my first real introduction to the world of raw foods. As a life long sufferer of IBS, I was always looking for dietary information that might help to ease my symptoms. The raw diet did just that for me.

After having such a significant turn around in my health, I was interviewed by my local paper and later, was contacted by Carol's writer, David Roth, and asked to share my story in The Raw 50. Working with Carol was a marvelous experience. The exposure to her left me with inspiration, as she truly practices what she preaches. Her knowledge and longevity in this lifestyle is something you can 't argue. Her skin, hair, eyes and aura are radiant, and at 48 years old....she is amazing.

No, I don't eat raw meat or dairy. I follow a high raw, vegan diet and I live free of irritable bowel syndrome. I have found the majority of the recipes in the Raw 50 to be a wonderful and delicious addition to my diet. Just like anything else, take what works for you and discard the rest. I fully recommend this book to anyone interested in incorporating more raw into their diet.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
43 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Piyodiva on August 23, 2007
Format: Paperback
The RAW 50 gave me a lot of information on why to eat raw. Even thou Carol says that you don't have to eat raw 100% of the time, I can't image eating any other way! I am always on the run, so I invested in a food dehydrator, visit my local farmers market once a week and take two hours on a Sunday to prepare most of Carols burgers, quiches, meatloaf and snacks for the week. I feel extremely educated with all the information that Carol provided. Who knew about Coconut Oil and how healthly it really is! Thanx for a great book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
69 of 80 people found the following review helpful By F. Clark on July 14, 2007
Format: Paperback
Great book... it contains some of the best raw meals I've come across. Unlike many books out there that attempt to sway you to try to choke down awful food in the name of health, Carol has managed to merge the world of health and vitality with savory delights.

You'll eat raw because it can taste better than eating cooked food...and is much better for you. You'll get the raw glow, will feel more energetic, and notice amazing results right away.

As for the safety of eating raw food, do your homework.

People have eaten raw for thousands of years. Do you think Eskimos cook(ed) their fish? Um...no.

C'mon...if raw food presented such a "safety" issue, then why can you find hundreds of raw foods in natural food stores...all with the approval of the USDA. Raw foods like nut butters, raw cheeses, etc. are prolific.

Again...all I can say is "do your homework".

Thanks Carol...for introducing me to the amazingly delicious world of raw food!
9 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Tracy E. Olson on August 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
The Raw 50 is an awesome book, I am new to the whole raw food cooking and this book has easy recipes with ingredients that are easy to find. The foods are delicious a must buy!!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Marianne on March 5, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is extremely creative, unlike most raw food recipe books that seem to be too basic and tasteless.
She has a gourmet touch with enough interesting combinations of seasonings to take it out of the ordinary.

This is a book that is a must for all young girls to see where true beauty comes from!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Costabile on October 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a great book for someone looking to start a raw food diet. The receipes are easy to follow and fun to make. The book overall is well organized.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Mom of 5 on November 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
Love ideas about alternatives in healthy eating. Some of the recipes take a lot of work like dehydrating "crackers or breads." Some ingredients are difficult to find and expensive. Snack and drink ideas are good. Interesting read. It's a lifestyle change, not something that is easy to do.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search