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The Red Rose Crew : A True Story of Women, Winning, and the Water Hardcover – September 27, 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion (September 27, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786866225
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786866229
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #406,503 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Boyne (Essential Sculling), a former women's varsity rowing coach at Tufts University, has written an exhilarating story about the early days of the U.S. women's national rowing team. Noting that society in the 1970s was radically different from today's, the author details some of the obstacles faced by women attempting to enter the male-dominated sport of rowing, especially in the Ivy League. The reader also learns a great deal about the complexity of rowing eights, including the technique and teamwork involved. Boyne's story takes us to the 1975 World Championships, where the U.S. women's team surprised the rowing world with a silver medal, carries forward to the 1976 Olympics, and concludes with a where-are-they-now section. Well written, direct, and effective, this book conveys the rowers' and coaches' skill, tenacity, energy, and enthusiasm for their sport. Recommended for public libraries, especially where rowing is popular.AKathy Ruffle, Coll. of New Caledonia Lib., Prince George, BC
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"The Red Rose Crew is a terrific book. It's not just for rowers, it's as universally appealing as The Horse Whisperer." -- John Casey, author of Spartina, 1989 National Book Award Winner

A thrilling account of the U.S. women's crew as it prepared to compete in the 1975 World Championships in rowing... -- Kirkus starred review

More About the Author

Daniel J. Boyne is the author of Kelly: A Father, a Son, an American Quest(Mystic), The Red Rose Crew: A True Story of Women, Winning and the Water (Hyperion/Lyons), and Essential Sculling (The Lyons Press). He has also written articles for The Atlantic Monthly, Harvard Magazine, Double Take, Wooden Boat, and Gray's Sporting Journal, among others. Most of his writing has concerned itself with the interplay between sport and society, and he has often focused on groups or individuals who have used sport as a means to change their social status.

He currently lives in Cambridge with his wife and daughter, and works at Harvard University.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 26 customer reviews
The book is a great read and the plot transcends the sport of rowing.
Karen Bardos
Dan Boyne cleverly weaves the stories of the very different characters that made up the crew throughout the book skillfully drawing them together at the end.
Blair Crawford
The book includes a compelling profile of Carie Graves, arguably the finest American woman rower and Harry Parker, legendary Harvard crew coach.
Wolfe Danzig

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By MacKenzie Smith on February 20, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Being a female rower, especially an older one, has many challenges... and rewards. Something I've learned about from personal experience. They're difficult to communicate with those who aren't involved with the sport (the risk of terminal boredom being very high) but form an incredible bond with those who are. This book, on the experiences of the pioneers of women's rowing in the 70's, tells it like it is, and makes it fascinating. Dan Boyne has recreated the whole experience of these women, and it's an experience that is, fortunately or unfortunately, not so far from the present day. It's an impressive addition to the tiny canon of rowing-lit, and even more importantly to the growing canon of books about women athletes and competitors, and what it takes to be in the game. A riveting read.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Blair Crawford on October 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I picked this book up expecting a vaguely enjoyable read but was quickly drawn into what is a hugely compelling story about women breaking through the prejudicial boundaries around their sport to record a historical result against the female(?) crews of Russia and Eastern Europe. Dan Boyne cleverly weaves the stories of the very different characters that made up the crew throughout the book skillfully drawing them together at the end. His writing is first rate and as someone who has lived in both the UK and Boston, US - the main locales for this book - I found it well researched and credible Rower or non-rower, male or female this is a terrific read
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By SusieP on December 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I just finished reading Boyne's latest book, the Red Rose Crew. It's fantastic. Boyne's lively and engaging style is perfect for this kind of history. Red Rose Crew is both informative and inspiring. I've been rowing for 10 years now, and I've recommended Red Rose Crew to everyone in my rowing club.Boyne's book is sure to motivate rowers of all ages and skill levels. Boyne's account of the 1975 Nationals, his description of that wonderful and anxious feeling all rowers have at the start line, made me hunger for the Spring season. As others have said, Red Rose crew is the best book on rowing since the Amateurs! If you haven't read Boyne's sculling book, it's also a must.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By THOMAS E WEIL JR on March 19, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Team rowing is an activity that tests individual limits in a group setting like no other sport. Unfortunately for the public vision of rowing, the same need for uniformity of action that drives a championship boat, and the relative linearity of the contest, combine to preclude the heroics of the team rower from being displayed, understood or enjoyed in as entertaining a manner as the feats of athletes in other sports. As a result, rowing, the first modern sport and the best known team sport in America in the midst of the 19th century, is today largely marginalized in the public eye, and those who move the long boats are rarely seen on the great stage of public sport.
Dan Boyne has rendered a tremendous service to rowing and to sport history by taking a subject that attracts so little attention on today's popular entertainment menu, and writing an enthralling tale of achievement that brings honor to the author and his subject.
The eight is the capital boat of the sport, and the challenge for Harry Parker's nascent U.S. women's team was daunting - to compete against European squads with greater depth, experience, organization and support, while at the same time creating its own place within an often hostile and unconvinced US rowing community. Boyne moves deftly betwen the stories of the parts and the whole, bringing focus to selected individuals and putting others into context to complete the picture. He chronicles the progress of the team as pages fall inexorably from the season's calendar, building his pace and pressure with each decision that establishes the crew's makeup. At the end, the story surges down the course to its dramatic and satisfying finish, and Dan Boyne has produced a tremendous saga well told, and an invaluable contribution to the too small corpus of rowing history. More, please!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By kate matwychuk on February 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
As a twenty something female athlete, it's hard for me to imagine a time when sports weren't as available for girls and women as they are today. I've always been given athletic opportunity and have been fortunate never to feel marginalized because of my unavoidable female status. Boyne's new book, "The Red Rose Crew" tells of a much different time when few women rowed, much less were given serious opportunities to compete. His story, which is really the story of a strong group of women and their male coaches who believed in them, is informative, thoughtful, insightful, honest and well-told. You don't need to be a rowing afficianado to get into this book. Rather, you simply need to be ready for a good story and to be left with feeling like you want go out and pick up an oar, even if you've never been in a boat before.
Boyne's male perspective may, at first, make some (female) readers skeptical about his ability to make sense of an experience that hinges on the main players being female and everyone else--those getting in their way--being male. But Boyne's sensitivity to the experiences of these athletes and his sincere interest and love of the sport helps to create an honest narrative that I think few would be able to recreate, male or female. I highly recommend this book for anyone looking to take a break from fiction and who has even a remote interest in the world of amateur sport.
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