The Reformation: A History (Modern Library Chronicles) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $2.93 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by angel3cake
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: cover is worn a little,otherwise in good condition tight binding
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Reformation: A History (Modern Library Chronicles) Paperback – September 5, 2006


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.07
$7.15 $2.99


Frequently Bought Together

The Reformation: A History (Modern Library Chronicles) + The Renaissance: A Short History (Modern Library Chronicles) + Asia: A Concise History
Price for all three: $43.74

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $1.99 (Save 80%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Series: Modern Library Chronicles
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Modern Library; Reprint edition (September 5, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812972953
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812972955
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #586,355 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

"The Reformation was awash with words," begins the third chapter of this book. "The historian who tries to catch its essence finds his net breaking under the weight of words." Although referring specifically to the truly jaw-dropping literary output of Martin Luther himself, given the primacy granted the Word in Lutheran doctrine, and the key role the printing press played in amplifying Protestantism, Collinson could well have been referring to the ocean of secondary literature on the turbulent religiosity of Europe's long sixteenth century. Yet Cambridge professor Collinson's brief and pithy history navigates smoothly through messy, if fashionable, debates (What is essential Protestantism? Reformation or Reformations? Catholic Reformation or Counter-Reformation? Capital R or not? and so on), and, in almost 300 pages, eloquently argues that the Reformation was indeed the watershed moment it has been mythologized to be--in many ways the inauguration of the modern world. In keeping with the other titles in his publisher's Modern Library Chronicles series, Collinson's elegant introduction is both erudite and highly accessible. Brendan Driscoll
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

"No revolution however drastic has ever involved a total repudiation of what came before it."

The religious reformations of the sixteenth century were the crucible of modern Western civilization, profoundly reshaping the identity of Europe's emerging nation-states. In The Reformation, one of the preeminent historians of the period, Patrick Collinson, offers a concise yet thorough overview of the drastic ecumenical revolution of the late medieval and Renaissance eras. In looking at the sum effect of such disparate elements as the humanist philosophy of Desiderius Erasmus and the impact on civilization of movable-type printing and "vulgate" scriptures, or in defining the differences between the evangelical (Lutheran) and reformed (Calvinist) churches, Collinson makes clear how the battles for mens' lives were often hatched in the battles for mens' souls.

Collinson also examines the interplay of spiritual and temporal matters in the spread of religious reform to all corners of Europe, and at how the Catholic Counter-Reformation used both coercion and institutional reform to retain its ecclesiastical control of Christendom. Powerful and remarkably well written, The Reformation is possibly the finest available introduction to this hugely important chapter in religious and political history. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Each topic seemed to fit so well together that the book flowed smoothly from beginning to end.
Galen K. Valentine
Like a couple of the others who've reviewed this book I believe this book to be a poor choice to get a handle on Reformation history.
Irvin Wilson
If you want to do some additional reading, Collinson has printed an excellent list of books for further reading.
William V. Powell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 29, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As author Patrick Collinson writes, this is a book about Western Europe - a period in Western Europe's development that, when drawn on a map, rather interestingly parallels the shape and development of the European Union community. Collinson gives attention at the start to the area of Christendom beyond the Western Church, but makes the point that the evolutionary/revolutionary pattern in the greater Orthodox world is far different from the West, and that it never experienced the kind of events that the Reformation and Counter-Reformation caused in the West.

The Reformation was not a one-time event, but an ongoing process over many centuries. The timeline Collinson provides at the start begins at 1378, the start of the Great Schism, the era of popes and antipopes, which provided some fertile ground for later Reformation in fact if not in theology and ecclesiology. This is of course 150 years prior to Martin Luther's grand pronouncements, followed quickly by John Calvin and others. Collinson's time frame continues up to the Glorious Revolution of 1688 in Britain, which finally established the Protestant rule in Britain.

Collinson's explorations show interesting sides to this tumultuous period of history. Luther's conversion story, often retold by Luther himself, changes periodically into not-always-consistent versions. This is part of the tension Collinson describes, the tension between Reformation as a process and Reformation as an historical event. Collinson also develops the idea of Reformation as something not necessarily tremendously radical - Martin Luther, according to many historians quoted by Collinson, can be seen as a medieval rather than a modern man - he `...offered new answers to old questions. He asked no new ones.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Henry W. Slangal on February 20, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Patrick Collinson is hailed on the book jacket as "Regius Professor of Modern History, Emeritus, Cambridge. A renowned scholar of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. . . ." I found this very small book, like any history, to have interesting nuggets, but was disappointed in that it assumed a familiarity with Reformation history I lack --and in fact purchased the book to acquire. The chapter on Calvin and Calvinism, for example counts only 16 small pages. These raced over the subject in a high-speed rattling-off of names, dates, and places, without engaging me in the historical story. One jacket blurb (London Times) recommended this book to readers like myself because of its brevity. I disagree. Find a larger book.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Ricky Hunter on November 5, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As a fan of the Modern Library Chronicles series, it was a thrill to read The Reformation. It is a great topic for this small format and the author, Patrick Collinson, handles the job with great intelligence and, surprisingly, a little bit of sly wit. The book ranges from before Luther and carries the story into the seventeenth century and beyond, but the main focus of the work is kept squarely on the revolutionary sixteenth century. The author keeps a balance in his discussion of the topic of the Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation and brings in the work of many previous scholars. The short format, of course, does not allow for great depth in the theological discourse but the author is effective in bringing out the important points in an efficient bite-size manner. A fine piece of work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Irvin Wilson on October 12, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Like a couple of the others who've reviewed this book I believe this book to be a poor choice to get a handle on Reformation history. I think a more "timeline" type approach would have been better. Instead, this work bounces around and throws bits and pieces at you. Makes it difficult to "get your brain around" so to speak. Being an intentionally short work he could have taken a few major paths and fleshed out their effect on Europe rather than trying to hit the highlights of so much. A very difficult read for those without a decent amount of knowledge on the Reformation to begin with.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey A. Auerbach on May 13, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I'm a big fan of the Modern Library series, and of Collinson's work in general, but the only virtue of this book is its brevity. It is certainly not for the general reader who wants an introduction to the Reformation: Collinson leaves too many basic ideas and concepts unexplained, and too many phrases in Latin untranslated. A symptomatic example: He writes, "We are nearly at the end of the chapter on Calvinism in which we have yet to define Calvinism" (p. 100). Not a very useful approach! The best parts of the book are its grounding in historiography (how historians' interpretations of the Reformation have changed over time) and its bibliography. Its major weakness, other than those already noted, is that it does not provide a sense of what people actually thought about religion, other than the insightful - but pithy - comment that the Reformation substituted the Ten Commandments for the Seven Deadly Sins (p. 13). It's not worth the time or the price.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Charlus on December 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A clearly written, wonderfully readable history for the non-specialist. The author clearly knows not only his material but is a valuable resource for all the other major writing on the subject and generously points the reader in other directions when relevant. Adding to the pleaure of reading this concise summary of vast amounts of historical information is a witty style that entertains as it instructs. The only complaints I have refer to frequent Latin phrases that are infrequently decoded and an occasional presumption of theological concepts that are foreign to the non-Christian (i.e. myself). Also sometimes the brevity leave gaping questions (e.g. when Calvin was made unwanted in Geneva, why was he called back?). Nonetheless, this is a fascinating, engaging work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?