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5.0 out of 5 stars Reviewd @ http://thebookharborblog.blogspot.com/
My Thoughts:
Main Characters:
Mia: When you first meet Mia in the registry, she was very Vain about her appearance. She didn’t question her life or her place, yet as events happen she begins changing her character. She starts becoming a different person. The main reason is what happens to her sister. She faces challenges on the road to freedom. Her...
Published 6 days ago by Chelsea

versus
39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Leaves much to be desired
Well, I had high hopes for The Registry, as I'm always on the lookout for another good YA dystopian with a strong heroine who rebels against the system, but I was disappointed. This book has some pretty big issues that kept me from enjoying the story.

The Registry features another dystopian American future where women have been oppressed again, along the lines...
Published 15 months ago by Jenny Q @ Let Them Read Books


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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Leaves much to be desired, June 14, 2013
This review is from: The Registry (Paperback)
Well, I had high hopes for The Registry, as I'm always on the lookout for another good YA dystopian with a strong heroine who rebels against the system, but I was disappointed. This book has some pretty big issues that kept me from enjoying the story.

The Registry features another dystopian American future where women have been oppressed again, along the lines of similar books like Eve and Article 5. Here's the thing that bothers me with these types of stories: none of them tell me how society got to be so warped that tough, independent, intelligent American women allow themselves to be subjugated, owned, and distributed as if the women's liberation movement never happened. In this story the main character actually wants to know how the country came to be the way it is and her companion tells her, "The origin doesn't matter." It is what it is and it's what we have to live with. Then later on, she asks a new companion only to be told, "Something happened. I don't know what." Then at the end someone finally claims to know what happened, but the explanation is rudimentary, lacking any supporting details, and doesn't connect any dots. I'm sorry, but if you can't tell me how we got that way, I can't believe that we would allow it to happen. And if I can't believe it could happen, I can't lose myself in the story.

The other overarching problem is the writing. It lacks any sense of style or sophistication. Every little thing is spelled out for the reader; everything is told; everything is obvious; there's nothing to read between the lines, nothing to wonder over and discover. The characters are juvenile and uninspiring. Dialogue and inner thoughts are blunt and stilted. The Registry could have been a pretty intense story, but to me it reads more like a draft version. The frame is there, but none of the legwork was done to fill in the blanks, flesh out the characters, or polish the prose. It does have some exciting action sequences and there is finally a romantic connection and some real emotion toward the end, but it wasn't enough to make up for the rest. I'm seeing mixed reviews on this, so I know I'm not alone in my disappointment, but there are plenty of readers who loved it, so if the story premise appeals to you, don't let me dissuade you from reading it. But for me, it just didn't live up to the quality of others in the genre.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Premise, but can't live up to it, January 20, 2014
This review is from: The Registry (Kindle Edition)
In the future, men outnumber women, and so when a woman turns 18, they go on The Reigstry. Men can view their profiles, and make a bid for their hand in marriage. Top bidder gets the woman. Mia Morrissey has been groomed from birth to be the perfect bride: pretty, graceful, and obedient. But when her older sister unexpectedly comes home, trying to escape her husband, Mia's perfect world is shaken. Now, instead of marrying a rich man, Mia wants to escape to Mexico, and she can't do it alone.
The premise of the book had me really wanting to like it. I like dystopian fiction, and this seemed to be right up my alley. Turns out the book didn't live up to the idea. Like, at all. And that disappointed me.
The biggest disappointment to me were the characters. They're all cartoons, or they have a personality switch. Mia starts the book pretty and dumb, waiting to get married. Then once she decides she doesn't want to follow the system, she attempts to be clever. She does everything wrong at dinner the first night she's meeting a potential suitor, expecting it to put him off her. Doesn't work. Within 50 pages of the novel starting (of a 300 page novel) she's run away, roping a smarter friend into coming along. She has no plan, but suddenly she has these insights and thoughts that a silly girl who solve basic math problems shouldn’t have. She's more confident, she knows what she wants. It all comes out of nowhere.
Whitney is Mia's best friend, and we get a lot of informed attributes about her. Her father wanted her to know things, so she could survive in case she didn't get a husband, so she learned a lof things. However, we never see any of her knowledge. Once they run away, Whitney becomes a whiny, cranky, shallow idiot. She loses her mind when the third member of their party, Andrew, has to resort to drastic measures, and she never gets over it. It's like Mia and Whitney had a personality swap once they run away.
Grant, the first man interested in Mia, is a cartoon. He's not a human being, he's a mustache twirling, tantrum throwing, clothes obsessed cartoon character. He decides Mia's screwing up dinner is cute, but he wants to break the spirit out of her. He pays her bride price and forces her father to sell her, and once he has control, he treats everyone else trying to recover Mia like they're morons, or minions beneath his notice. He's obsessed with coordinating his outfits, which only detracts from the novel. He does cartoon villain things, and acts like a maniac. He's not a real character.
The plot of the novel doesn't cover things we should probably know, and it's frustrating. The Registry is really glossed over, despite being the defining part of the book. We know Mia answers some basic questions (Can you cook? Etc) gets her photos taken, and fails a 50 question test. From Mia's conversations with Whitney, who supposedly knows things, we can assume the better you do on that test, the lower your price is. In a world where parents want the best price for their daughters, you'd think at least the fathers would spread that knowledge amongst themselves, so they could encourage their daughters to do poorly for a better price.
Also, it takes most of the book to find out why The Registry came into being, and all we're given is bits and pieces. At the end, we get an answer, but it's not very complete. For a book titled “The Registry” it's only marginally tied to it.
Ultimately, there isn't enough good to save this book. There are a few interesting scenes, like where we find out what life is like for women who don't have husbands, and a train station scene, but it's not enough to save the book. Poor characterization and a lack of details really killed it for me.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars At least the concept was good?, September 25, 2013
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This review is from: The Registry (Kindle Edition)
If the author had spent as much time on world building and character development as she did on describing the various outfits, it would have been a decent read. As it is, the characters felt flimsy and I knew more about the clothes than I did about the plot. I do not plan on reading the sequel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Blah, September 30, 2013
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This review is from: The Registry (Kindle Edition)
I didn't like this story at all. I didn't connect with the characters and, in fact, could barely stand them. I couldn't have cared less what happened to any of these people. I didn't like the world or the back story. The main character was annoying and whiney.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ugh, January 14, 2014
This review is from: The Registry (Paperback)
I just tried to read this and couldn't force myself past a dozen pages.
Reminded me of something I tried to write in elementary school.
I agree with Jenny Q, she said it well , describing what is wrong with the writing style.
I will condense it to one word; horrible.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very Little to Recommend It, July 18, 2014
By 
anotherbibliophile (High Sierra Desert United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Registry (Kindle Edition)
The characters were poorly developed and frequently annoying. The action was inconsistent. The plot had no depth. The calamity that caused the freaky, dysfunctional world scenario was never satisfactorily explained. There was brutal killing and then they all shrugged it off, even the good guys. Trying to figure out their motives was a strain because the writing was muddy. It was hard to get into the story. Even the editing left much to be desired. The concept probably could have been interesting if handled well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A knockoff of "Wither" by DeStefano, but with bad characters, April 13, 2014
This review is from: The Registry (Paperback)
This book's main issue is its characters. It did not matter what kind of situation these people were thrown into, they were like robots. I might have been able to tolerate the lack of emotion if it wasn't paired with complete stupidity. Bad decision after bad decision, Mia in particular lacks the ability to think her way through any situation. You could argue this is due to her lack of education, but there are some things that happen in this book that are just too obvious to give her the benefit of the doubt.

Aside from the horrible characters, there are entirely too many cliches in this book. The dialogue, the villains, and the plot are all so stereotypical and fake it makes it very hard to lose yourself in the story and believe any of it.

I wish I had more to say about this, or at least something positive, but it really was just not very good. If you are looking for a YA dystopian novel dealing with women's rights, look at Wither by Lauren DeStefano. It is mostly the same idea as The Registry, but the characters are much better and the plot offers additional details and side plots which make the overall book significantly more interesting.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyed, but didn't have the wow factor, June 16, 2013
This review is from: The Registry (Paperback)
When I first read the idea of this and then saw it was available on Edelweiss, I knew I had to give it a try. This one has been getting a lot of mixed reviews, but I actually enjoyed it. I don't think I would re-read it, but if there is a sequel, I think I'd look into it. I loved the idea behind the Registry even if it did remind me of a mix of other dystopian books, "Matched, Delirium, Hunger Games..."

However, I felt the pacing went quite well. I flew through the book to find out if Mia would get her freedom, if romance was in the cards, and what the repercussions of her escape would be.

Again, I liked the plot well enough, but I felt like there were a lot of things lacking for me. I don't feel like I got enough characterization. I liked Mia, the main character, well enough but I wasn't overly attached to her. Sure, I wanted her to be able to live her life free of oppression and I definitely didn't want to see her get caught by her horrible, psychotic 'husband'. Stoker explains to us that Mia used to dream of finding a husband in the Registry and she couldn't wait to be entered- she was one of those frivolous girls. But after an incident with her sister, Mia comes to the realization that maybe the Registry is not all it seems. Now, the girl that used to dream of her wedding, can't stomach the thought of one and wants to run away. However, her father has already found a suitor for her, by the name of Grant Marsden. (I love Grants, so I hate this one was a bad one!) He is a billionaire, but is cocky, self-assured, and an arrogant ass. Your hatred for him really grows throughout the book, as you see the lengths he will go to to find Mia and bring her back. It's all a game to him, he is thrilled by the chase of finding Mia. Which is crazy, because he doesn't want anything to do with her. He simply does not want to be shamed and he wants her just because he can.

Which brings us to Andrew. He is a worker for Mia's family, who has a few months before he can enter the service. He gets swept up in Mia's escape plan, and together, they and her best friend Whitney, who has no marriageable prospects, attempt to flee to Mexico. I can't really say I liked Andrew. He was irritable, cold, distant and made it very clear on multiple occasions he didn't want to be helping them. Yet, after several opportunities to abandon them, he doesn't. He intends to see it through and while he is slightly attracted to Mia, he will not allow himself to get close to her. I don't know how to really explain this, but the romance just felt so forced between them. It didn't flow naturally. I've read a lot of stories about cold, distant guys who refuse to acknowledge feelings to the female lead. But slowly over time, their tough exterior chips away and they find themselves falling. I didn't really get that with Andrew. It was like "I don't like you, I can't stand you" to "Ok, I love you. Let me tell you now that you're having other feelings and get all pissed off over it."

Yes, I said other feelings, as in another guy. Sigh. I only like love triangles when they're done right. This was just thrown in for added measure. Towards the end of their journey, they meet Rod and his son, Carter. They are the last leg of the escape, if you will, and hides them in their house until it is time to cross the border. Carter is the complete opposite of Andrew. He is open, flirty, and makes no attempt to hide his interest in Mia. There is kissing involved between the two, but really Mia wants Andrew. To the point where she'll kiss Carter and pretend it's him. Yeah.

Then, there's Whitney, Mia's best friend. Mia begs her to run away with her and although she has some reservations, she agrees. She knows she doesn't have any marriage prospects in America, so why not see what's available for her in Mexico? I don't really know how I feel about Whitney's character. She was a good friend to Mia, but at times, she really got on my nerves. I thought she would be the tough one, but after an unavoidable incident occurring Andrew, she gets worked up and distrustful.

As I said, I felt the pacing went well, but I still felt like there were some events that happened for shock value, but it was really to add some action into the story. I'm more of a fan of buildup, but a lot of events were kind of rapid-fire. And then the ending, just kind of ends. It's not a cliff-hanger, but it does leave us going, 'Well, now what?'

Overall, I certainly didn't mind reading this book and it did hold my attention, but it just didn't have the wow factor I was hoping for.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Reviewd @ http://thebookharborblog.blogspot.com/, September 10, 2014
By 
Chelsea (Alabama, US) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Registry (Kindle Edition)
My Thoughts:
Main Characters:
Mia: When you first meet Mia in the registry, she was very Vain about her appearance. She didn’t question her life or her place, yet as events happen she begins changing her character. She starts becoming a different person. The main reason is what happens to her sister. She faces challenges on the road to freedom. Her character has become this sheltered girl to a warrior. The initially unlikable Mia adjusts to her new circumstances quickly, becoming braver and more self-reliant. I loved the character growth, as Mia wasn’t annoying for long and changed in believable ways.

Andrew: He is a hard character to figure out. I like that the author include perspectives from his point of view. He wants to like Mia, yet he holds himself away from her.

Carter: He is funny, charming, and cute. I like his character a lot.

Other Characters!

Sister (Corinna) - She risks her life and pay for it to help her sister to learn the truth about the Registry. I think she was selfless and honorable and should be treat as much.

Parents- They was jerks. They love the money more than their own daughters. They pretty much sold them off for the money they would bring.

Best Friend/ Fellow Traveler: Whitney – This girl kind of got on my nerves. She is selfish and only thinks of herself. She decides leaves Mia and Andrew. At the last second, Whitney sacrifices herself to help Mia and Andrew to escape from Grant.

Villain in our Story: Grant Marsden. – He is an interesting character. I think the best way to describe him is that he is a murder and a control freak. I think he is unhinged in some areas. He likes to play games with people. He won’t hesitate to kill anyone. He won’t stop until he has Mia in his hands.
Wrap-Up:
A world where young parents have to hand over their sons to the government and raise their daughters to be sold to the highest bidder at age 18. Writing was generally very good and we quickly learn that there are many explanations for how the registry system came to be. I’m still hoping for a slightly better explanation in the next novel, but as is, it’s a mystery our heroine is getting closer to solving instead of a poor explanation by the author. The plot wasn’t complex but the action and pacing made for an exciting escape story. I’m not sure how I feel about the love triangle with Mia, Andrew and Carter. This book was a very thought provoking that I have read in a while. I can’t wait until book 2.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 3.5 stars I liked it more than I thought I would., February 10, 2014
This review is from: The Registry (Kindle Edition)
At A Glance
I loved it, I hated it. The Registry is an odd one for me because there was a lot of things wrong with it but I found myself devouring the book with zealous.

The Good
Yes, everything people are saying on Goodreads is true about this book. But I didn't care. I went into this book with great apprehension since many seem not to like it. But I was shocked to find myself excited to pick up the book time and time again, even regretful to put it down at all. The Registry is not going to work for everyone, but if you can enjoy the surface story without delving too deep into plot and character, then this book can work for you.

You are going to hate a lot of people in The Registry. Each person is worse than the other. The concept alone is already horrible enough. Women sold like cattle and used to bred more girls who will meet the same fate. Boys thrown out of the home to fend for themselves until they become of age and are forced to serve their country with their lives. All the while, this seems perfectly normal to the whole of America, except for the few who know the truth. Mia learns the truth and now all she can think about is escaping to Mexico for a new beginning, a chance at freedom.

Mia is an interesting character. We find her brainwashed like all the other "good" girls. She wants to be bought and married. Until her sister reveals the truth about marriage. Now all Mia wants to do is escape. She goes of half-cocked into a world she doesn't know and brings along her best friend and forces a boy to lead the way to Mexico. Mia is very selfish and ignorant in the beginning. She thinks so highly of herself it's hilarious. But she get's a rued awakening on her travels. And Mia transforms into this determined but humbled woman. It takes time to really get to know Mia and she isn't perfect, but she is trying to be a good person and that's all that counts.

For me, Grant is the best character. He's evil, straight up evil, and he knows it. He enjoys it. He's not delusional about who he is. He wants a wife to treat badly, and Mia's fiery defiance only makes him want to bring her to heel even more. Maybe he will kill her when he is done with her, maybe not, it doesn't matter to him. You have to love a bad guy who is unashamedly HORRIBLE. He leaves a trail of broken people and dead bodies in his wake and enjoys every minute of it. But Mia's parents are almost worse for the fact that they are parents who care nothing for their daughters except for the check they bring in. Their daughters can die horrible deaths and it wouldn't affect them in the least as long as they got their money.

Andrew and Carter are the love interests. Yes, a love-triangle. Andrew is a tough character to like but you always admire him for helping Mia escape despite the risk to his future. Carter was a nice change up to Andrew, with his lax and fun-loving attitude. He just brought a smile to my face.

Though not the most original, I found the storyline to be both sickening and fascinating. Shannon has truly created a dystopian world that is hard to read about sometimes but that's what makes it intriguing. I tip my hat to her for a job well done.

The Bad
I am going to list most of the reasons Goodreads reviewers don't like this book because I agree with them, however, I easily got over most of these things and just enjoyed the story overall.

-Yes, Andrew is a douche who treats Mia like crap, which is he kind of has a right to since she blackmailed him, but it still makes him very unlikable. He is emotionless and expects Mia to choose him for no reason whatsoever other than obligation for helping her.
-Plot holes galore and inconsistencies.
-Most of the characters are flat and one-dimensional.
-A thrown in love-triangle that was so not needed.
-It kind of ends in the middle of the story. A slight cliffhanger. No wrap-up.

The Snuggly
The love triangle came out of the blue. It happens near the end and didn't seem needed. However, I liked Carter way better than Andrew. But it was obvious Mia was always going to pick Andrew despite him treating her like crap the whole time. At least I got my good, cute moments with Carter and Mia.

Very YA, no sex, just kissing and sexual situations.

Final Thoughts
Sure, there are a lot of things wrong with this book, but it doesn't mean it's not an enjoyable read. On the surface, it's an intriguing concept that keeps you reading. The characters need more depth, so I can only hope it happens in book 2, which I will be reading. Recommended to those who can handle The Bad.

Quotes
"Her happiness is not my concern." Grant said. "I'm buying her to make me happy."

"All you seem to care about is money. You sold your daughter, your own flesh and blood, without even utilizing the mandatory waiting period to check me out. You knew me less than a week before agreeing. I bet right now you still don't even care about her."

"You don't even know me," Mia responded playfully.
"I know that you're brave, that you're strong, and I wouldn't want to get in your way. It takes a lot of courage to escape, and I am completely enamored with you."
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The Registry
The Registry by Shannon Stoker (Paperback - June 11, 2013)
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