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The Rejection Collection: Cartoons You Never Saw, and Never Will See, in The New Yorker Hardcover – October 3, 2006


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Frequently Bought Together

The Rejection Collection: Cartoons You Never Saw, and Never Will See, in The New Yorker + The Rejection Collection Vol. 2: The Cream of the Crap + The Best of the Rejection Collection: 293 Cartoons That Were Too Dumb, Too Dark, or Too Naughty for The New Yorker
Price for all three: $71.15

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Gallery Books; First Edition edition (October 3, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416933395
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416933397
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 8.3 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #227,292 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The submissions were not set aside because they were not funny but (for the most part) because they were too funny.
--New York Times

About the Author

Matthew Diffee has been contributing cartoons to The New Yorker since 1999. He was recently singled out by the New York Times as one of the more prolific of the new generation of cartoonists. To date, he has had more than a hundred cartoons published in the magazine. Originally from Texas, Diffee now lives in New York City. This is his first book.

The New Yorker is an award-winning weekly magazine featuring reporting, criticism, commentary, fiction, poetry, and renowned single-panel cartoons. It has won more National Magazine Awards, the magazine world's equivalent of the Oscars, than any other magazine. Its contributors have won numerous awards, including the Nobel Prize and the Pulitzer Prize. Robert Mankoff is the cartoon editor of The New Yorker, and a cartoonist in his own right. He is the editor of many collections of New Yorker cartoons, including The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker.

Online:


www.newyorker.com

Customer Reviews

These are laugh-out-loud funny cartoons.
Ken Howard, LCSW
This book is a collection of the best rejected cartoons from the New Yorker magazine.
Frederick S. Goethel
This is a good gift for the coffee table--or for bathroom reading.
PB

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

93 of 95 people found the following review helpful By E. Bukowsky HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 31, 2006
Format: Hardcover
"The Rejection Collection," edited by Matthew Diffee, consists of cartoons that were "too risque, silly, or weird" to be accepted by the New Yorker magazine. Diffee asked thirty of his friends and colleagues, all of whom have had their work published in the New Yorker, to sift through their rejects and submit their favorites. From these, Diffee picked HIS favorites, which he dubs "the cream of the crap."

Diffee inserts photographs of the artists as well as quirky questionnaires that allow the cartoonists to express their feelings about such topics as their childhoods, what makes them laugh, and how they handle rejection. Unsurprisingly, their answers tend to be offbeat, humorous, and filled with doodles. The cartoons themselves have to be seen to be believed. They are scatological, profane, sadistic, stupid, clever, politically incorrect, and often hilarious. It's fair game to satirize crooked politicians, cosmetic surgery, and idiotic voice mail messages, but how can anyone make fun of adultery, chemotherapy, transsexuals, child abuse, alcoholism, and suicide? Aren't these subjects off limits? It turns out that in some cartoonists' slightly warped minds, no subject must be avoided in the name of political correctness and good taste.

One of the book's strengths is the insight that it offers into the creative process. Some of the artists believe that the writing and the ideas are more important than the drawings--no ideas, no cartoons. However, in the best cartoons, the writing and drawing are so well integrated that neither element dominates. These cartoons work so well that the reader finds himself laughing out loud (and feeling guilty afterwards).
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Phelps Gates VINE VOICE on December 22, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
These cartoons are much funnier than the ones which actually appear in the New Yorker. I usually laugh out loud two or three times per issue, but almost every cartoon in this book was a winner! Most of these cartoons were rejected not because of poor quality, but because they're in, ahem, questionable taste. The little questionnaires (full of sly wit) which each cartoonist answers were annoying at first, but ended up being one of my favorite parts of the book (partly because they stopped me from barreling through the cartoons and getting overloaded). A perfect gift for somebody who isn't easily offended!
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46 of 55 people found the following review helpful By D. Low on November 26, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The cartoons in this book are mostly great, and I am very glad that Matthew Diffee decided to collect them between two covers for our benefit. However, what definitely weighs the book down are the interruptive cartoonist questionnaires which, although funny at times, reek of self-importance. As someone who takes great interest in cartoons and cartoonists, reading through the cartoonists' witticisms feels unnecessary even to me. One purchases a book of cartoons to see the cartoons, and the long Q&A sections that pepper the book simply destroy any sort of flow that it may have had. In general, cartoons which are funny individually become much funnier when looked at cumulatively (an idea that Stephen King hinted at in his introduction to one of the Far Side treasuries). Unfortunately, this book never allows itself to establish a one-after-another, hit-you-until-you're-down rhythm, and it suffers for it.

My advice to Mr. Diffee is to attempt to publish a second volume, 3rd, and 4th, etc., but without the cumbersome stoppages every three pages. There are clearly enough wonderful rejected cartoons out there to merit these volumes, and continuing to publish them is a fantastic idea, but the cartoonists' egos should be left at the door. Being a cartoonist is about showing off your work, not yourself.

If, however, somebody decided to compile biographical pieces on and photographs of New Yorker cartoonists, and not market the book as a book of cartoons, the questionnaires used in this tome would be highly appropriate and informative in that type of setting. Maybe that's another idea. But the two shouldn't be combined, because the reader is left wanting either way, not getting enough cartoons or biographical stuff.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By M. C. Deaver on June 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I had high hopes for this book, and it did not disappoint. I laughed out loud many times while reading the book.

I must disagree with the reviewer who did not like the cartoonist questionnaires interspersed throughout the book - I thoroughly enjoyed them. They allowed the cartoonists to be creative in new ways. By the way, have a look at the lower right box in the questionnaires, the small gray box that says "For office use only" - Diffee fooled most of the cartoonists into leaving that box blank, which was funny in and of itself.

Can't wait for the next book in this collection to come out.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By sbtier on January 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I liked the cartoons in the book, which ranged from hilarious to hu-hum to just plain bizarre. It was interesting to see cartoons in the 'New Yorker' style that were either too risque, offensive, obscure, etc. to publish.

For each of the 40 cartoonist, there is a 2-page questionnaire they filled out. Unfortunately, humor in cartoons doesn't always translate to humor in this questionnaire, and most of the time they just come off as trying too hard. I wish these 80 out of 250 pages were cut and more cartoons presented.
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