Qty:1
  • List Price: $30.00
  • Save: $2.23 (7%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Excellent customer service. Fast shipping and provide tracking info for ALL shipments. Satisfaction guaranteed. Book might contain highlighting/underlying and/or notes but the text cannot be obscured or unreadable. Book might also show sings of wear in edges and corners.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Reluctant Metropolis: The Politics of Urban Growth in Los Angeles Paperback – August 9, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0801865060 ISBN-10: 0801865069

Buy New
Price: $27.77
17 New from $22.77 34 Used from $3.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$27.77
$22.77 $3.99
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The Reluctant Metropolis: The Politics of Urban Growth in Los Angeles + Reinventing Los Angeles: Nature and Community in the Global City (Urban and Industrial Environments) + Southland
Price for all three: $62.64

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (August 9, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801865069
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801865060
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #484,721 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The Reluctant Metropolis is a welcome addition to the growing literature of place. Bill Fulton brings verve and lucidity to the politics of land use, a mega-issue ready to explode in the years ahead.

(James Howard Kunstler, author of The Geography of Nowhere and Home from Nowhere)

A surprisingly lively case study of the battles and alliances of politics, business and people that formed—or deformed—a great American city.

(Publishers Weekly (starred review))

One of the most entertaining and thought-provoking books I have read in a long time about urban growth and change... Important reading for anyone interested in contemporary urban development. [Fulton] tells a story that may sound uniquely Los Angeles, but really applies to every growing city in America.

(Richard Peiser APA Journal)

From the Publisher

***"A surprisingly lively case study of the battles and alliances of politics, business and people that formed—or deformed—a great American city." —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"The Reluctant Metropolis is a welcome addition to the growing literature of place. Bill Fulton brings verve and lucidity to the politics of land use, a mega-issue ready to explode in the years ahead."—James Howard Kunstler, author of The Geography of Nowhere and Home from Nowhere

"One of the most entertaining and thought-provoking books I have read in a long time about urban growth and change . . . Important reading for anyone interested in contemporary urban development. [Fulton] tells a story that may sound uniquely Los Angeles, but really applies to every growing city in America."—Richard Peiser, APA Journal


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 16, 1997
Format: Hardcover
The power of this book is the "up close and personal" portrait it gives of the people and events that shaped the modern era of Los Angeles and the sinking of the illusion of eternal land. What a story he tells, including naming the key players and their real estate interests, especially the complicit role of planning professionals and politicians.

Changes in the region take place so quickly that current events need a scorecard and a constant updating from this traveling historian who puts miles on his car that are needed just to keep up with it all, and to keep us conscious of what is happening before our eyes. Unlike many of the fashionably post-modern critics with their morbid fascination for the contradictions and the big picture, Fulton doesn't theorize or jargonize about the City. Like a hunter who tracks his prey by following all the little bent branches and signs of habitation, he takes us to the places that make up the region, Bell, Commerce, Lakewood, Lynwood, and like a good hunter, he does not stand apart from his prey. Fulton shows basic empathy for all the misguided professionals and greedy politicians who unconsciously and consciously sullied and exploited the region, as well as the naiveté and the shortage of savvy of some of its would be saviors.

Written like a compelling detective story, but one for which he does not have an ending, the book is a must for anyone who lives in the region. They will be both weighted down and enlightened by reading it, and for you people from other regions, for example burgeoning cities in the NIC regions of Asia, you best read it now to get an idea of what is coming your way!

George Rand, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Architecture and Planning

Graduate School of Architecture

UCLA
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Chuen Ng on August 26, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is a must read for anyone willing to expose themselves to the stories behind the stories of Los Angeles. The stories reveal the apathetic and self-centered nature of some Los Angeles citizens (who will never really admit they are from "Los Angeles"), and sets the stage for an entire change of mindset among Los Angelenos. This mindset is one that takes notice of the community, and the larger metropolis that communities make up. For a graduate city planning student as I, these stories help shape some basic values of mine regarding the nature of cities and communities. I strongly recommend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 9, 1997
Format: Hardcover
You and I aren't fools. We keep our eyes open. We follow the news. But the region where we live is so huge and complex. And changing so quickly. With short deadlines and tight budgets, most of what the media packages as "news" is not -- just old caricatures recycled with new names. Southern California is romanticized, demonized and satirized, because Southern California stereotypes make for great entertainment.

As amusement, this works. But half truths, myths and stereotypes make it virtually impossible to talk seriously about our region's future. Imagine trying to raise a child if all you had to go on was a video of the Hollywood movie, "Parenthood." The movie makes you laugh, it makes you cry. But it's useless for helping you figure out how to manage your family budget or what to do when your baby wakes up crying in the middle of the night.

That's our position as citizens, voters and taxpayers. Clueless. Not a problem -- if "Southern California" was just a soap opera. Or if we lived in a monarchy. But it's not and we don't.

Driving one rainy day from his home in Ventura County through "suburb after suburb, shopping center after shopping center and tract after tract," journalist and planner Bill Fulton began a journey of discovery that led him to write an extraordinary book called "The Reluctant Metropolis: The Politics of Urban Growth in Los Angeles." He calls it "an amalgamation of political science, history, sociology and urban planning" aimed at "telling good stories and ferreting out their meaning.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By James D. Umbach on January 24, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Wow! William Fulton's look at the workings of Los Angeles government takes the reader on a trip through history to help discover how Los Angeles got to be how it is today. Many different case studies explore various elements of this "Reluctant" metropolis, such as the story of one particular block downtown, the fight with Las Vegas over water rights, how the urban transportation system came to be the way it is--and why it will never change, and how a college student singlehandedly and unintentionally changed the face of Ventura County politics forever. These are just a few of the fascinating tales William Fulton spins of Los Angeles. As a member of a Southern California transit advocacy group, I found the entire book hard to put down. After reading this well-written book, the reader should be more knowledgeable about the west's largest metropolis and how many elements come together to shape a region. I hope you enjoy this book with the same enthusiasm with which I did.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews