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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Long Overdue Pleasure
It is an absolute travesty that it has taken this long for a book on the 'Mats to find its way to print. Kudos to Jim Walsh and Voyageur Press (a Twin Cities publisher) for rescuing the die-hard, Mats-starved fans. While many oral histories can be tricky reads, Walsh made the absolute best decision when he chose this format for his book. Rather than hearing only one voice...
Published on October 22, 2007 by Dusty Punch

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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Much like their career - compelling but inconsistent
This somewhat disjointed oral history is an essential read for any mats fan, although those of us who closely followed them during the 80's have probably already read most of the interviews from which Walsh quotes (which makes up the bulk of this book). Far from a comprehensive bio of the band, but a lot of good nuggets do exist. I did find that the chapter on the mats...
Published on November 19, 2007 by why


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Long Overdue Pleasure, October 22, 2007
By 
Dusty Punch (McKinley, WI USA) - See all my reviews
It is an absolute travesty that it has taken this long for a book on the 'Mats to find its way to print. Kudos to Jim Walsh and Voyageur Press (a Twin Cities publisher) for rescuing the die-hard, Mats-starved fans. While many oral histories can be tricky reads, Walsh made the absolute best decision when he chose this format for his book. Rather than hearing only one voice tell the story--as legitimate as Walsh's voice may be--he tells the story through the many voices of those who had consumed the band in all its tragic greatness over the years. After all, the Replacements were never a band to simply be heard...they had to be experienced. This book helps readers who may have never seen the band live do just that.

On another note, I would like to provide some clarification as to a previous 2-star review of the book. The reviewer lodged a complaint about the author not letting us know who each person is throughout the book. I won't address how we disagree on the value of this book, but I did want to let folks know about a very helpful list starting on page 269 entitled "The Players." Each person quoted in the book is listed, along with a brief description of who they are.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally, a great book about my all-time favorite band, October 20, 2007
By 
Brian P. Stack "BPS" (Sleepy Hollow, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
While I loved the chapter devoted to The Replacements in the terrific book, "Our Band Could Be Your Life", I always hoped someone would put together a more complete history of this incredible band, and Jim Walsh did a great job putting "All Over But the Shouting" together. I'd highly recommend the book to any fan of The Replacements, and to anyone curious about 80's underground music in general. Oh, and in response to the person who found all the names in the book confusing, there's a list in the back of the book that briefly explains who all those people are, or in some unfortunate cases, were.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's never a good thing when your dad joins your favourite band.", March 7, 2008
By 
Graeme Wallis (Newcastle, England) - See all my reviews
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So says Bob `Slim' Dunlap shrewdly of the effect his recruitment to The Replacements' ranks in 1987 had upon his daughter. Emily's discomfiture however, is indicative of the love-the-band/hate-the-group relationship that many have with the `Mats, and this is certainly one of the most enduring impressions left by Jim Walsh's oral history, All Over but the Shouting. As Paul Westerberg himself famously sang, "the ones (that) love us best are the ones we'll lay to rest," and Walsh's account certainly bears out the notion that the closer you got to the band the harder they were to love.

Herein, Walsh has collected a multitude of accounts from band members, associates, contemporaries, scenesters and onlookers and aptly synthesized them into an affectionate and engrossing chronological account of the turbulent history of one of rock's great bands.

A positive feature of the text is that Walsh has assembled much varied discourse from Westerberg, as well as from the 6 other major players: original lead guitarist Bob Stinson, teenaged bass player Tommy Stinson, drummer Chris Mars, Bob Stinson's replacement Slim Dunlap, roadie Bill Sullivan and original manager/mentor Pete Jesperson. Favourably, he also avoids falling into the trap of merely reiterating previously available information on the band - most notably in the Sire-years greatest hits collection All For Nothing/Nothing For All and Michael Azerrad's compendium of epochal independent 80s bands Our Band Could Be Your Life in which the `Mats figure prominently.

Ironically, given his rather paradoxical position within the band's history it is Slim Dunlap whose sensitive, articulate and altogether rational recollections provide the most objective and absorbing reading, detailing the highs and lows of living alongside the band as a close friend and respected contemporary to living within the band as the oft-maligned replacement to the elder Stinson.

Westerberg's accounts, on the other hand are more inconsistent, ranging from an initial reticence to discuss his band in anything other than vague peripheral terms to an eventual realisation that printed word could be used for his own means - seemingly too late. Tommy Stinson is more ambiguous still - disappointingly he is not greatly represented - but generally shoots from the hip, yet even his fond memories are always tinged with a sense of ambivalence. An overriding sense of each of the pair's striking ego pervades much of the accounts on them also, with instances of commendable actions few and far between.

Bob Stinson, predictably is portrayed as the fallen hero of his generation; a gentle-giant of a man with no discernable assets beyond his ferocious lead guitar skills and a big heart. Touching testimony from former partners rounds this out but also repudiates the cultivated image of him as something of a simpleton. The comparative lack of comment from or pertaining to original drummer Chris Mars however, serves to further marginalise him from the Replacements' myth.

An integral problem the book suffers however, is that there is a striking sense of Twin Cities' `in-crowd cool' to it in that responses to the `Mats from an audience outside of Minnesota are not well documented (save for two scathing snippets from (journalist/Big Black/Shellac frontman) Steve Albini, and the ubiquitous hometown-hero reverie demonstrated toward Prince is misplaced. A further problem with this issue is that the scope of those interviewed is neither great nor varied. Minneapolis' own Soul Asylum (Dave Pirner & Danny Murphy) and Hüsker Dü (Bob Mould & Grant Hart) are two of too few bands who made it beyond the indie ranks to contribute and the Hüskers' testimony is disappointingly non-revelatory considering the rivalry between the two. However, R.E.M.'s Peter Buck does offer some insightful backstage anecdotes - yet again, there is a simultaneous longing to read something attributed to Michael Stipe.

Despite some of its short-comings however, the positives outweigh the negatives substantially, rendering All Over but the Shouting an engaging and comprehensive chronicle of the life and times of one of rock's greatest and most shambolic bands.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Much like their career - compelling but inconsistent, November 19, 2007
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This somewhat disjointed oral history is an essential read for any mats fan, although those of us who closely followed them during the 80's have probably already read most of the interviews from which Walsh quotes (which makes up the bulk of this book). Far from a comprehensive bio of the band, but a lot of good nuggets do exist. I did find that the chapter on the mats in "This Band Could Be Your Life" told their story more completely, although succinctly. You won't find too much insider information here that hasn't already been reported elsewhere - no real stories of what is was like during the recording of Let It Be, or their appearance on the American Music Awards, etc. This could book have been a contender - just like the mats could have been.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A compelling read, November 11, 2007
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Wow! I loved this book way more then I initially expected to. Walsh has managed to craft a well-written, engaging narrative out of other people's quotes. It was like reading a novel with rising action, climax and all that other good stuff you often turn to fiction for. I even knew what was going to happen and I still couldn't put the book down.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Homesick, October 24, 2007
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Reading the names I see the faces. I never met the writers but knew most every one of them from reading City Pages and the Twin Cities Reader--then seeing them buying records at Garage D'or, the Fetus, Oarfolk, or on stage at the 400, First Ave, Entry, Uptown. Out buying records. The memory of a hometown place like that causes homesickness.

The weather keeps me away. This book brings me back.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy it now!, October 23, 2007
By 
Gilligan (Minneapolis, MN USA) - See all my reviews
This is a fascinating documentation of one of the greatest, most unique bands that ever existed. The author was so much of a part of the band's history (he gave the eulogy at guitarist Bob Stinson's funeral!) that he wisely chooses to step back and let the participants tell their sides of the story, while filling in details when needed.
When you hear so many different viewpoints, you get a much more well-rounded feel for these characters who raucously carried the rock and roll torch through a generally bad decade of music.
This book is a must-read for anyone who loves The Replacements. It could be used as a textbook for any aspiring bands or musicians in the "school of rock".
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Band Ain't Talking, May 5, 2010
By 
Mr. Mango (Florida, MO USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting: An Oral History (Paperback)
First of all, I love the Mats. They are my heroes and have been since 1986. But the band has moved on, as well they should, and the band ain't talking. This is pretty important, you should know this going in.

You should also know his book doesn't have any interviews with the band, it's not even a biography of the band. It's not even a music critic's look at the band.

It's a bunch of disjointed anecdotes about people who were fans of the Mats. And while I assumed that ANYTHING about the Mats would be welcome material, I assumed wrong as this book was largely boring and unforgettable.

I bought the hardcover the first day it was available. And I wanted to love it, I really did.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dang you Walsh!, November 18, 2007
By 
JS "jswanson47" (Minneapolis, MN USA) - See all my reviews
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Halfway through this book I was ticked off. The insiders' comments and pictures were great but I wanted something more to tie everything together. Jim Walsh is an excellent writer and I bought this book because I wanted to read his writing. I wanted the story like he could have told.

Then I read that eulogy. Darn you. Good job, you got it right.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars By the People, For the People, October 22, 2007
By 
Legal Beagle (Minneapolis, MN) - See all my reviews
If you want a book filled with a rock journalist's blow-hard musings of why and how the Replacements were the greatest band in the world and "what they meant to ME!" go elsewhere or write it yourself. There are too many rock books our there that are just a writer expressing his/her unsolicited opinion on a band or musician and how the writer was directly affected and what they meant personally to the writer (biggest exception here is Peter Guralnick gives us exceptional accounts without his own ego getting involved.) This book is none of that. It's done properly, taking the writer out of it and letting those that lived through it, including the 'Mats themselves, tell the story with often hilarious, and sometimes touching, mind-boggling, or brutally honest anecdotes. Witten in the "oral history" style, we learn through the fans, non-fans, and the members of the band (including deceased guitar god Bob Stinson) how the 'Mats came to be and what it like to have a part in what was the greatest (though they'd argue this) rock 'n' roll band of all time.

Whether you liked, hated, or just didn't care about The Replacements, buy this book. It's an exceptional documentation of a time in music history when any band in any basement in any town still had a solid chance to rise to the top without first being sanctioned by Simon Cowell and his machine.

Note: In response to Jonathan F. Coscio's review above, there is a neat, handy index at the end of the book, telling who each speaker is, etc. in case you, too, query "Who, exactly, is this 'Bob Mould' character?"
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The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting: An Oral History
The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting: An Oral History by Jim Walsh (Paperback - November 30, 2009)
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