Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.99
  • Save: $2.34 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsbooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book is used, fast shipping and great customer service.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Republic of East LA: Stories Paperback – March 4, 2003


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.65
$3.46 $0.95

Frequently Bought Together

The Republic of East LA: Stories + Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned + What Makes Sammy Run?
Price for all three: $37.23

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 239 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (March 4, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006093686X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060936860
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #443,113 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Rodriguez is skillful at rendering the aura of East L.A.” (Kirkus Reviews)

“a flashy take on the vital Spanglish-Speaking culture of East Los Angeles.” (Body & Soul)

About the Author

Luis J. Rodriguez is the author of several critically acclaimed books, including Always Running, The Republic of East L.A., and Hearts and Hands, as well as poetry and books for children. He lives with his family in California.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is my second Rodriguez book, following Always Running, and I think I'm hooked on him, now. Each short story is impossible to turn away from, and each represents a different sub culture of East LA's Chicano and Mexican cultures. Most importantly, however, each represents a different character and personality, within each of these subcultures. Modern American entertainment tends to lump all minority characters into one revolving cyborg, as if they're all connected to the same brain. Rodriguez's answer to that is introducing us to the real people of East Los Angeles and their real feelings, not only toward America, but toward each other. About as far as mainstream American folkore goes with the latter is the drive by gang war. Rodriguez doesn't leave that out either. But he gives us a different look, one from the "locas", or the women. The issues they face, ranging from violent to romantic to family neglect, will not give you the time to wonder, "what do they see in these guys, anyway?". And to think, we're distracted from this question just reading the book; imagine being in their shoes...

It's this kind of writing that makes people like Rodriguez so important to America today, as unfortunately, stories of culture in places like East Los Angeles die on a vine before reaching the American mainstream household or entertainment venue, which leaves the role of messenger to Hollywood film producers and book publishers, who more often than not give us their own version. What else could explain most mainstream productions of Latino, black, or Asian culture?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Olivas on April 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
Luis J. Rodriguez once again has painted a vibrant and complex picture of those who work, live, love and die in "The Republic of East L.A." Rodriguez's prose is straight-forward yet poetic as he tells us about the varied struggles of cholos/as, a budding journalist, a limousine driver, immigrants, working people, all sorts of gente. My favorite story is "Sometimes You Dance with a Watermelon," where forty-year-old Rosalba (an immigrant living in poverty and already a grandmother) needs to escape her crowded home to get a momentary bit of joy. She rouses her favorite granddaughter, Chila, and they drive to Grand Central Market where they buy a watermelon. Rosalba balances it on her head and starts to walk swaying "back and forth to a salsa beat thundering out of an appliance store." She and Chila get caught up in this joyous dance:
"Rosalba had not looked that happy in a long time as she danced along the bustling streets of the central city in her loose-fitting skirt and sandals. She danced in the shadow of a multi-storied Victorian -- dancing for one contemptuous husband and for another who was dead. She danced for a daughter who didn't love herself enough to truly have the love of another man. She danced for her grandchildren, especially that fireball Chila. She danced for her people, wherever they were scattered, and for this country she would never quite comprehend. She danced, her hair matted with sweat, while remembering a simpler life on an even simpler rancho in Nayarit."
This is a powerful, beautiful collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rudy on November 21, 2007
Format: Paperback
I really didn't know what to expect from the book when I got it. I was going on a guess that I would like it having already read the author's previous book Always Running. But the characters are so real and one can see them so clearly and draw on their experiences. I am not from East L.A. so the culture is different from my own in many ways, yet Rodriguez has allowed the reader to empathize with the characters so easily. My favorite story was "Finger Dance," which is about a father called Chi Cho who put his whole soul into his metal work and artistry and "who was feared, respected, and to be honest, just plain ornery," but somehow missed making an important connection with his children (77). As the father's health declines due to dementia and cancer, his son Arturo finds a way of connecting to his father in a way that is very moving. No one can read this story (as well as the other stories), and somehow not come away moved and very impressed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By LASGS on January 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
The Republic of East L.A. is incredible because it talks about the truths of East L.A. Some stories are hard to believe because it is so gruesome and tragic. For example, on page 63, a sixteen-year-old girl named Noemi got raped by some vatos. Furthermore, on page 229, there were women who sold themselves for sex in order to obtain money. However, there are parts of the story that are just funny. For example, on page 64, a freshman girl named Olivia fought over a seat and got suspended. We would recommend The Republic of East L.A because it has an exciting mixture of settings, emotions, and characters. We recommend this book because it talks about betrayal, love, and tragedy. Overall, this book is worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?