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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disney Animated Classics #23 and #29: Two wonderful films that look better than ever!
The Rescuers was the last feature produced by Walt's legendary team of animators (the nine old men) and is easily their best since Walt's death in 1966. Released in 1977, The Rescuers is a delightful and heartfelt story full of adventure, poignancy and great characters. Both Bernard and Miss Bianca are wonderful creations that compliment each other. Madame Medusa may seem...
Published on September 7, 2012 by Don Vito Corleone

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37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bonus DVD Packaging
This review is not about the Blu Ray, which is outstanding in both the picture & sound. Instead, the review is about the packaging of the 2 bonus DVD's. Disney decided to go with a double case instead of a triple case. This resulted in the 2 bonus DVD's being stacked on one spindled on-top of each other, resulting in the top DVD being scratched. Surely Disney could...
Published on August 25, 2012 by J.


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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disney Animated Classics #23 and #29: Two wonderful films that look better than ever!, September 7, 2012
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This review is from: The Rescuers: 35th Anniversary Edition (The Rescuers / The Rescuers Down Under) (Three-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging) (Blu-ray)
The Rescuers was the last feature produced by Walt's legendary team of animators (the nine old men) and is easily their best since Walt's death in 1966. Released in 1977, The Rescuers is a delightful and heartfelt story full of adventure, poignancy and great characters. Both Bernard and Miss Bianca are wonderful creations that compliment each other. Madame Medusa may seem like Cruella De Vil but is not at all forgettable. The voice cast is spot on with Bob Newhart, Eva Gabor, Geraldine Page and the rest giving memorable performances and bringing unforgettable characters to life. The story of these two mice rescuing a little girl keeps you invested the whole time and you care for them very much. The Rescuers may seem a like a little obscure film but the truth is that is a Disney classic through and through.

Released 13 years later in 1990, The Rescuers Down Under was Disney's first official sequel produced by the main studio (not to be confused with a cheapquel). With high production values and using the CAPS system for the first time, Down Under is a breathtaking adventure. Bob Newhart and Eva Gabor reprised their roles as Bernard and Miss Bianca as they now are headed to Australia to rescue a little boy from an evil poacher. While I like the first film more, the sequel stills has a lot going for it. Again the voice cast is wonderful, the updated animation looks amazing and the flight scenes are absolutely mesmerizing.

Both The Rescuers and The Rescuers Down Under offer high quality entertainment and they're sure to delight the entire family.

Video & Audio

First, I have to say that The Rescuers DVD was one of the worst DVDs I'd ever owned. That being said, this BD is a very solid upgrade. The picture is clean for the most time although some tiny specs appear from time to time. Detail and clarity are strong and artifacting is nowhere to be found. A nice job done by Disney.

The Rescuers Down Under looks brighter and more striking than its predecessor. Detail and clarity are spot on and colors are bright and bold. It's not a CAPS transfer and some light grain permeates the picture but it gives it a nice filmic quality. A nice transfer all around.

Both films have 5.1 DTS-HD MA and while both get the job done, Down Under has a better use for it than the first film (due of course to inherent limitations). All in all, both are adequate mixes.

Bonus Material

This is the most disappointing part of the set. Being its 35 anniversary and being such a great film, I expected more and more substantial bonus material for The Rescuers. Anyway, this is what was included:

"Peoplitis" is a recently found deleted song from The Rescuers. Introduced by director Ron Clements, the song is nothing extraordinary and it is better that it was cut off.

"Water Birds" is an episode from Walt Disney's famous True-Life Advetures

"Three Blind Mouseketeers" is a silly simphony featuring mice.

"Disney Song Selection"

"The Making of The Rescuers Down Under" is a promotional piece that came around the same time the film was released. It's a very short piece but at least is something.

A DVD copy is included for each film.

Final Thoughts

The Rescuers is an absolute Disney classic. The Rescuers Down Under, while not as good as the first is still highly entertaining. Both films offer nice transfers, good sound and a slim amount bonus material. Anyway, buy this set and you won't be disappointed!!
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37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bonus DVD Packaging, August 25, 2012
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J. (Virginia Beach, VA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Rescuers: 35th Anniversary Edition (The Rescuers / The Rescuers Down Under) (Three-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging) (Blu-ray)
This review is not about the Blu Ray, which is outstanding in both the picture & sound. Instead, the review is about the packaging of the 2 bonus DVD's. Disney decided to go with a double case instead of a triple case. This resulted in the 2 bonus DVD's being stacked on one spindled on-top of each other, resulting in the top DVD being scratched. Surely Disney could have spent a few more cents & gone with the proper case to accommodate the 2 bonus DVD's & the 1 Blu Ray. A little disappointing for a company that always stood for quality.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mouse Giveth, the Mouse Taketh Away. Original Bonuses are dropped!, August 25, 2012
This review is from: The Rescuers: 35th Anniversary Edition (The Rescuers / The Rescuers Down Under) (Three-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging) (Blu-ray)
WHAT'S MISSING from the original DVDs?
The Rescuers' biggest casualty is the loss of a 15-page Scrapbook holding concept art, character designs, behind-the-scenes production photos, and publicity artwork. Also dropped, and of lesser interest, is "Under the Hat Villains", a 90-second Toon Disney short celebrating the studio's animated villains (including Medusa) with clips and some animator comments. The last omission from the original movie's DVD is "The Ultimate Case" set-top game, which let you sleuth around rooms to find Penny's missing teddy bear (with the Devil's Eye Diamond inside) à la Bernard and Bianca with clues from "Orville."

Lost from The Rescuers Down Under's original Gold Classic Collection DVD are its original theatrical trailer, a virtual DVD storybook, and a 16-question trivia game. And expectedly not resurfacing from inside its case are an Animals of the Outback booklet and chapter insert.

You may want to hold on to your original DVDs and sell off the bare bones DVDs included here.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another High Quality Disney Release!, August 21, 2012
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This review is from: The Rescuers: 35th Anniversary Edition (The Rescuers / The Rescuers Down Under) (Three-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging) (Blu-ray)
For those of you interested in the technical reality of this new Blu-ray release... Rest assured, this collection belongs on your movie shelf! I have always thought The Rescuers looked horribly bad on home video, from the VHS tapes to the DVD's, so I was very intrigued to see what this Blu-ray release would turn out. I was absolutely blown away by the level of quality showcased here! Crisp, clear, and beautifully rendered... The opening charcoal paintings in the credits have a real vibrancy to them, almost as if the viewer is looking at the original drawings. Bernard, Bianca, Penny, and the rest of these timeless characters literally jump off the screen, and I have no qualms saying that they have NEVER looked more alive than they do here on this release. I bought this title solely for this movie and I consider my money well spent. On to The Rescuers Down Under! Initially, I was more underwhelmed with this transfer than the original Rescuers. The overall picture looked bland and some scenes are not nearly as crisp as I saw in The Rescuers or other Disney Blu-ray releases. However, after viewing standard def 90s 'documentary' (featured as an extra on this release) on the making of this sequel, I realize what a stark upgrade the high definition transfer gives us! Yes, the palette is mostly in the realm of neutral colors with vibrant hues being a rare occurrence, but I doubt the video quality will ever look better than it does here without a complete overhaul of the original source elements. The worst the film looks is in the first five to ten minutes. Once Bernard and Bianca are on their journey to Australia, the quality most certainly improves. If I were to give out ratings based solely on the visual appearance, The Rescuers gets 5/5 stars and its sequel, 3.5/5 stars. However, fans of either or both movies will not walk away unimpressed! Buy this today because it deserves its home in your Disney Blu-ray collection!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great fun for the kids and for me!, March 20, 2013
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Amazon Customer (Cincinnati, OH United States) - See all my reviews
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My kids, who are 3 and 6, like to watch a bunch of goofy movies that I find to be pretty boring. But when I showed them The Rescuers they loved it and I enjoyed watching it too. Lots of action, drama, and humor. A great story line and positive family friendly fun. When we have a chance to watch a movie, I always encourage them to choose The Rescuers! The Rescuers Down Under is okay, but we love the original movie best.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Two Top-notch Animated Adventure Films, March 17, 2013
Overview:

Walt Disney Studios has produced many classic films through the years, but its consistently innovative and often brilliant work in animation is what made the company the powerhouse it is today. Several generations have grown up watching Disney classics such as Snow White and The Seven Dwarves and Pinocchio, and many more generations to come will enjoy newer classics like The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast. Although Disney has many classics under their belt, there are also many films that fewer people may remember, and some that many have tried to forget!

Considering all this, its difficult to know where The Rescuers stands in the long history of Walt Disney Studios. It may lack the beautiful animation of the early days and the modern elements of the renaissance era, but what it does have to offer is modesty and heart. The story and characters are very simple, but somehow that's make makes the film so powerful and effective, especially for kids. The Rescuers and its 1990 sequel The Rescuers Down Under often aren't considered in the same breath as Cinderella or Sleeping Beauty, but with likable characters, an adventurous spirit, and a feeling of innocence lost in many modern animated films, they are actually just as good.

The Rescuers (1977)

Both The Rescuers and its sequel follow the same basic plot. A particularly evil person with a doofy sidekick kidnaps a cute little kid because they know the location of something rare. In the case of the first movie, an orphan girl named Penny is kidnapped by Cruella Deville's redheaded cousin because she knows the location of a valuable diamond. Penny manages to reach out for help with a message in a bottle that goes all the way to New York city, where its found by a council of helpful mice. A bright and peppy female mouse named Miss Bianca volunteers to find Penny and asks the humble janitor Bernard to aid her on the quest. Against all odds they set off on an adventure to rescue Penny from her captors.

The Rescuers is very effective in getting the audience emotionally involved in its story. The animators at Walt Disney Studios are masters at audience manipulation, and their tactics are very evident here. Penny's story is very tragic and there are many scenes that will tug on your heartstrings until they snap. Many people appreciate the sentimental aspects present in may Disney films. There are many reassuring speeches, sappy musical interludes, and downright sad scenes spread throughout the film, but I sometimes feel the sentimentality is laid on too thick.

This was the first Disney film to be written by both the classic team known as the Nine Old Men as well as several new coming writers intended to carry the flag into the new generation. As a result we get a mix between the old-school spirit of sentiment and drama as well as the newer style of situational comedy and exciting action. I think that for the most part the outcome of this was something unique, and it gives The Rescuers a very distinct style when compared so some other Disney animated films.

The characters are probably my favorite part of this movie. Disney films do a great job of making you love the heroes and love to hate the villains, and The Rescuers is certainly no exception. In fact, it defines that ability more than any other movie I can think of. The main characters Miss Bianca and Bernard are small and furry little creatures with really big, emotional eyes. They are essentially the epitome of cute. The other friendly characters they run into along the way are fun and entertaining as well. The villains are also designed with sinister perfection. The first time you see Madame Medusa, you immediately know she's the villain just by the way she looks. She is very ugly and she has no neck (reminds me of my third grade teacher).

In terms of comedy, this film was trying to be more dramatic compared to other films of that era including The Jungle Book and The Sword and The Stone. Still, the film contained many funny moments, mainly as a result of Bernard's nervousness during the adventure. There is also one very funny minor character who breathes fire every time he takes a sip of whiskey. Who doesn't love some good old fashioned retroactively offensive Disney moments?

As someone who recently re watched The Rescuers after seeing it just a few times as a kid, I have to say I didn't really hold this movie in a high enough regard. I always thought of it as a little more boring than most Disney movies, but now I don't think that's true at all. It kept me entertained the entire time and I was throughly engaged with the story and characters. Several scenes were as tense as anything I've seen in an animated film. The Rescuers may not be the perfect Disney film, but it sure is a great one.

RATING: 3.5/5

The Rescuers Down Under (1990)

The first Rescuers movie was released to high praise from critics who gave a lukewarm reception to Disney's previous animated feature, Robin Hood. The Rescuers was seen as a return to form for Disney, who by the late 70's had lost much of the respect they had garnered in the 40's and 50's. The film continued doing well in several re-releases so in a rare move for Disney it was decided that a sequel be produced.

The result was the 1990 film The Rescuers Down Under, which saw our heroes Bernard and Miss Bianca once again team up to save a kidnapped child, this time a young boy trapped by a sinister poacher hellbent on discovering the whereabouts of a rare bird in the Australian outback. The plot is very similar to the first movie, but with a whole lot of additional characters and a whole lot more production value. This film looks absolutely great, but what else would you expect from Disney in the 90's?

Down Under was the second film to be released during the Disney renaissance and it shows in the quality of both the animation and the writing. Gone is the humble nature of the original movie, replaced with the grand spectacle of the 90's. This time instead of a lame ballad as an opening, we get a spectacularly animated sequence of the young boy soaring through the air on the back of a majestic eagle. I can see why most people my age know the sequel more than the original.

The obvious difference between the first and second movie is its attempt to broaden the appeal in terms of both comedy and action to a younger generation more accustomed to the cartoon style of saturday morning cartoons than the animated films of old. The comedy comes more quickly and easily than in the first movie. All around I felt Down Under had a more light-hearted feel than the heavy-handed original. The characters are more playful, and as a result more relatable as well.

The action of this movie is truly spectacular. There are many sequences in this film that will have you on the edge of your seat. I was reminded of Indiana Jones many times while watching, and believe me that's a very good thing! Everything is smooth and quick-paced, and most importantly easy to follow whats going on.

Overall The Rescuers Down Under is a fitting sequel to the classic original that brings a lot more to the table than one might initially think. The animation is absolutely great, and the tone is light-hearted and fun. It is a film that won't disappoint if you're looking for a family film anybody can enjoy.

RATING: 4/5
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Blu-ray Review: "The Rescuers" and "The Rescuers Down Under" 35th Anniversary Edition, August 23, 2012
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This review is from: The Rescuers: 35th Anniversary Edition (The Rescuers / The Rescuers Down Under) (Three-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging) (Blu-ray)
I can now show my children this wonderful film thanks to Walt Disney Home Entertainment's 2-movie Blu-ray release of "The Rescuers" and "The Rescuers Down Under" in a 35th Anniversary Edition. Both films are charming and hold up well. However, the original remains the jewel in the crown.

"The Rescuers" tells the story of two mice named Miss Bianca and Bernard. Miss Bianca is a member of the international Rescue Aid Society and Bernard is their janitor. Miss Bianca chooses Bernard as her cohort for a mission to rescue a little girl named Penny from a devious woman and her inept accomplice. They're using the child to look for a lost diamond in the swamps of Devil's Bayou.

Besides the messages of good wins over evil and you have to confront a challenge even if you're afraid, this movie is just fun. There aren't any great social commentaries or life lessons to be found. It's a whimsical and suspenseful adventure for the whole family.

"The Rescuers Down Under" takes Miss Bianca and Bernard to the Outback of Australia. There they must rescue a boy from the clutches of an evil poacher named McLeach. McLeach uses the child as an unknowing guide to the nest of an eagle and its eggs. Can they save the boy and keep the poacher from killing the great eagle and her offspring?

Unlike its predecessor, this sequel carries an obvious statement against the hunting and killing of animals. It's still an action-packed thrill ride and very humorous even with an agenda. I think every animated film in the early 1990s needed a purpose and reason to exist.

Hungarian actress Eva Gabor voices Miss Bianca with all the sophistication and panache she was known for. Bob Newhart brings Bernard to life with his trademark quiet and indifferent vocalization. John Candy gives a comical performance as the bumbling albatross Wilbur. George C. Scott sounds as malevolent as I'm sure Disney allowed him to as McLeach.

The high-definition transfers of both films look great. The recent "The Rescuers Down Under" looks finer than the original as far as animation quality goes. You can see the limits of the art in "The Rescuers" getting pushed a bit beyond their original "real film" intentions. The movie still looks and sounds better than it ever has. The audio for the movies shine brightly through their 5.1 surround mixes.

There are quite a few special features in this edition. They include the deleted song "Peoplitis" and a sing-along song entitled "Someone's Waiting for You." It contains the classic Silly Symphony short "The Three Blind Mouseketeers" and the featurette "The Making of 'The Rescuers Down Under.'" The "Water Birds" Disney True Life Adventure is also included.

The 3-Disc 35th Anniversary Edition of "The Rescuers" and "The Rescuers Down Under" on Blu-ray is a perfect addition to any family's movie library. You get two spectacular films and a satisfying amount of bonus material in one package. It's recommended for all devotees of animated Disney features.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NOT THE ROYAL TREATMENT, BUT THE BEST THESE TWO FILMS HAVE EVER LOOKED ON HOME VIDEO!, November 13, 2013
This review is from: The Rescuers: 35th Anniversary Edition (The Rescuers / The Rescuers Down Under) (Three-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging) (Blu-ray)
Disney Studios 23rd full length animated feature film from the Disney studios. The Rescuers has been justifiably paired with the studios 29th animated feature film the sequel released 13 years later The Rescuers Down Under.

The original Rescuers film is not one of my favorites, but it isn't a bad film. It just looks and feels a little underwhelming compared to the classic Disney animated films of Yesteryear. The Rescuers is a dark film both in visual style and story. It's not the first time Disney has had dark themes in their animated films, but this one seems dark throughout.

The Blu Ray transfer of the first film is too dark and doesn't appear to have had the royal treatment in terms of clean up. It is brighter than the old DVD, but it should have been brightened up a bit more because in the night scenes (which are most of the time) the detail seems lost in the darkness. Don't misunderstand me, I wouldn't want to change the original concept and art, just let us see all that great animation and beautiful color work. The color palette is interesting and certainly different than most of Disney's animated films. I actually like it a lot. There are occasional specks here and there and the whole film just looks like it needed a little more care. It's still the best this film has ever looked on Home Video and I don't think we'll see a better version anytime soon.

This is also one of the rare occasions where the new Xerography process suits the material. The Xerography process while being a cost saving achievement did not make these newer films better in my opinion, in fact they just don't have the Disney luster we've all become accustomed to.

Like I stated in previous reviews on films from this era of Disney's animated cannon the process has been fleshed out more and the new process isn't as jarring as it seemed in Sword and the Stone and some others from this time period between 1961-1981.

The artwork is beautiful in the film, but it is a totally different style. The rougher lines on the drawings being exposed tend to come across like their unpolished, but this is really not the case with this film, Jungle Book and 101 Dalmatians. Because Disney ended the traditional process with the fabulous looking Sleeping Beauty, (yes one scene used this process.. a sort of trial) these films looks very 2 dimensional and just don't seem to have the same magical look to them.

The Rescuers is the first and only animated film from Disney to get a theatrical sequel (until the recent Winnie The Pooh sequel) and I for one think the sequel is a better film. This may be in part because the newer film looks so much better and is brighter. The restoration seems to be very good, but to be fair this film may not have needed nearly as much work as the original. The Blu Ray is by far the best looking home video release. There are other reasons I prefer this film to the original, one is the dramatic art work and sheer scale of the scenes are something we hadn't seen from Disney before this. Even if Disney's animated films didn't always improve upon the early classics, it is interesting and impressive to see them trying something new with each picture. I've watched them all in order in a very short amount of time and I can see their growth in some areas, sadly not always giving us a better film each time.

I own DVD release and the new Blu Ray and it's nice to see we're getting past the aspect ration issue years, the new Blu Ray (like the old DVD release) is in 1:66:1 which it the correct aspect ratio. The fact that we get both films on this release is a good selling point, but while the Blu Ray looks very good, the addition of a "making of" for the first film, Trailers? Hello? and some new worthy extras would have gone a long way to bring this release up a notch, it is a 35th anniversary edition after all. Why not celebrate it with some newly recorded interviews and making of the film stuff? There are some decent extras, one being from the true life adventure series some vintage shorts etc., but it all seems rather randon to me. If you want to own The Rescuers and The Rescuers Down Under, then the Blu Ray is the way to go. You may want to hold onto your DVD's for the extras, but that's your decision.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Two superb animated features that typify two different Disney eras, August 17, 2012
This review is from: The Rescuers: 35th Anniversary Edition (The Rescuers / The Rescuers Down Under) (Three-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo in Blu-ray Packaging) (Blu-ray)
A substantial number of Disney animated feature debut on Blu-ray this Tuesday. One release, perhaps more than any other, stands as a crossroads between "old school" and "next generation" Disney animation: The Rescuers and The Rescuers Down Under.

When The Rescuers premiered in 1977, it was very well received but the public and the press, though things behind the scenes were getting tumultuous.

Based on Margery Sharp's book, The Rescuers follow two mice who rescue humans on behalf of their Rescue Aid Society (a group that co-exists behind the walls of the United Nations building). Eva Gabor voices the lovely Bianca and Bob Newhart plays Bernard.

There's wonderful casting all the way around, harkening back to an era when Disney did enlist celebrities for the lead characters (who promoted the film on The Merv Griffin Show) and allow character actors and voice actors to round out the casts. Disney was still the name above the title and the studio had neither the budget nor the inclination to cast the multi-million-dollar variety of superstar often heard today in theatrical animation.

Times were simpler then, perhaps, and so is the film, which follows a very linear storyline as the mice board an albatross (voiced by longtime radio star Jim Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly) and head for the bayou to rescue a little girl from Madame Medusa (the flamboyant Geraldine Page in her second Disney film) and her flunky Snoops (a caricature of Disney historian John Culhane voiced by Disney comedy veteran Joe Flynn in his only animated Disney role).

Not a musical, the film does have atmospheric songs performed offscreen by Shelby Flint, who hit the pop charts with "Angel on My Shoulder" and had become a very busy vocalist for TV shows, commercials and animation (Snoopy Come Home, Rankin/Bass' Rudolph and Frosty's Christmas in July, NBC's The Borrowers). An Oscar nomination for Best Song went to "Someone's Waiting for You." (Robie Lester fans take note: she is the singing voice of Bianca.)

But at the Disney studio, animators were becoming divided about artistic direction and Don Bluth was not pleased with what he saw as shortcuts on The Rescuers. Within a few years of this film, he would lead an artist walk out that impacted the next feature, The Fox and the Hound, the last feature to combine the talents of new and veteran animators.

You can also see this blend in The Rescuers -- masterful work by artists who worked with Walt and those that they mentored. Of course, the animation of Medusa is astounding, its roughness and energy captured in the sketchy, "scritchy" look of the xerox cel process. This a look didn't always suit the films in which it was used, but it works well here.

The Disney studio had never produced a sequel to any of its animated features before The Rescuers Down Under, but much had changed by 1990, including a new management team and transformations in corporate philosophies. But unlike some of the direct-to-video features that would emerge, this film boasts superior production values that actually exceed that of its predecessor.

Some of that sheen is due to rapid advances in computer technology, making specific settings, effects and animated objects more accessible. The CAPS system was perhaps the biggest develop to debut in The Rescuers Down Under. This eliminated the need for inked and painted animation cels -- the artwork went directly into the system for outline and color. Because of this, there is no breakdown in image quality (which could happen with layer upon layer of cels).

Eva Gabor and Bob Newhart are back as Bernard and Bianca, this time flown by a different albatross. Jim Jordan had passed away, so John Candy's voice added not only contemporary celebrity, but also a broader comedy potential and therefore appears in much more of the film as comic relief.

The biggest difference is that the villain is, this time around, not played at all for laughs, but completely evil and disturbingly unbalanced, brilliantly voiced by George C. Scott.

There are no songs at all in this sequel, though "Rescue Aid Society" is part of the underscore. Bruce Brougton's score is excellent -- and the recurring theme heard in his music is also used for the dancing fountain at the Epcot theme park.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rescuers Rescue Us From Boredom!, October 27, 2012
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Normally, I don't approve of Disney's recent 2 Movie Collections since Disney is proving to be lazy, but this is an exception. I enjoy BOTH "Rescuers" movies, but of course in their own different ways. The original "Rescuers" is soft and heavy, but also an enjoyable mystery and rescue mission, very similar to my favorite Disney movie "The Great Mouse Detective." I like "The Rescuers Down Under" for being a more modern action-packed wilderness adventure, having a similar heart to modern computer animated films. It is very rare to see an animated movie take place in the Outback of Australia, and I think this movie has detailed it very well. This sequel is actually way better than those lousy direct-to-video sequels. This 2 Movie Collection DVD is unregrettable!
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