Return of the Sword: An Anthology of Heroic Adventure and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$2.50
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Dash O' Pizazz
Condition: :
Comment: Paperback in good condition. Will ship very quickly.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Return of the Sword Paperback – March 15, 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, March 15, 2008
$14.50 $2.50

"An Unwelcome Quest"
Ever since Martin Banks and his fellow computer geeks discovered reality is just software, they've been happily jaunting back and forth through time. Who knew that rotten Todd would escape, then conjure a game packed with wolves, wastelands and other harrowing hazards--and trap his hapless former hack-mates inside it? Find out more author Scott Meyer
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Cyberwizard Productions (March 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 097957885X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979578854
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,415,616 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
I especially appreciated its cohesion and that it serves as a primer for new storytellers writing in the genre.
periklis
It was well written with engaging characters and it was quirky but held my attention all the way through in a way that quirky stories seldom do.
Cherie
They're great for "in-between-books-reading" and are perfect when you just want a story that you can start and finish in one sitting.
Greg

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Cherie on April 6, 2008
Format: Paperback
With this anthology you get exactly what you'd think you'd get. It's full of swords, full of blood, and full of action. To make things even better, it's got one of my stories in it. Here's my honest take on it:

Altar of the Moon- A story about the aftereffects of a sword of power and the person forced to wield it in order to save a kingdom. Just one problem, the burden of bearing the sword becomes unbearable and it won't let itself be cast aside. This is a good emotional story with two characters that struggle with each other but are not technically enemies. Both protagonist and antagonist are sympathetic and the ending is written well. Two swords up.

The Wyrd of War- Bill Ward delivers an outstanding tale of dark magic and violent war. A doomed army defends against the mindless onslaught of an eldritch horde, twisted and corrupted by a mysterious evil. The thing that stands out immediately in this story is the use of language and mood. The hero faces impossible odds and is driven on by precious memories of a past denied him. It's the kind of thing I was trying to do with Raven Kill and it's done better. This could be my nomination for best of the book.

The Last Scream of Carnage- This is an interesting and odd story. The protagonist is definitely not heroic in any way. He's simply arrogant and violent and looking for the next thing to kill. What makes for compelling reading here is the physical arrangement of the prose, often assembled in poetic forms. You get the feeling you're reading something special and that must be why it is the feature story for the anthology. It is cleverly crafted but doesn't leave you with a character to care about so the impact it makes is not personal but rather an appreciation of its clever crafting.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Dan Nelson on May 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
"Flashing Swords Presents: The Return of the Sword" edited by Jason M Waltz

The editor says there may be "...no finer compilation of heroic tales of action and adventure..." and, at least in recent memory, he may be right. Flashing Swords Press has been trying to present and create a place for Sword and Sorcery. They have met that goal and gone beyond it as these stories are indeed fine heroic tales and are of a quality that extends beyond a genre offering.

The book has language to thrill, a wonderful cover painting by Johnney Perkins, thoughtful introductions by the editor, Jason M Waltz, an article on writing fantasy by E E Knight and too few interior illustrations.

The first story, "Altar of the Moon" by Stacey Berg fits right into the theme of the anthology's title as a sword does return. The mysterious conversation between the characters that have and will fulfill their destinies postpones the confrontation in a delightful piece of pacing.

Battle descriptions usually do not hold my attention as I usually rush through them but not here with my choice as most outstanding story. As I read "The Wyrd of War" I felt as if I was seeing a Peter Jackson film. Full of smoke and the fog of war, a very intimate and detailed soldier's experience is related. I felt driven by the momentum of fate in this elemental tale.

"The Last Scream of Carnage" by Phil Emery makes interesting use of formatting the spacing of the text which earned it the editor's choice. It is a very intense tale which would make a great radio adaptation. Too bad Orson Welles is no longer around to read this for us. Pay close attention to the way the sentences read, lending power to the actual words.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Greg on January 10, 2009
Format: Paperback
I read and have read a lot of anthologies. They're great for "in-between-books-reading" and are perfect when you just want a story that you can start and finish in one sitting. Anthologies are also a great source for sampling different writers.

Jason M Waltz did a great job of picking out the stories to use for The Return of the Sword. Except for only one or two stories (even the ones that weren't particularly something to my personal taste) I found these to be very well and interestingly written.

The Return of the Sword contains twenty sword-and-sorcery tales -- too many for me to summarize and rate individually here. I'd say most of the stories fall between 3 and 4 stars, but my personal favorites -- "The Battle of Raven Kill" by Jeff Draper, "To Be A Man" by Robert Rhodes, "The Hand that Holds The Crown" by Nathan Meyer, and "The Mask Oath" by Steve Goble are each an easy 5 stars and then some. In fact, I'd buy this book for those stories alone. And I'd venture to say that most any fan of fantasy literature will find something to their liking in this book.

I highly recommend The Return of the Sword to anyone who appreciates a straight-forward adventurous tale, and I applaud the effort to present some quality sword & sorcery tales in a market where the sub-genre seems all but forgotten. I hope more publishers will follow suit and give us more new S & S books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S E Lindberg on January 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The "Return of the Sword" is aptly titled: the Heroic Fantasy (Sword & Sorcery) genre may have originated with R.E.Howard's Conan ~1920's, but it is alive and well; this anthology captures the renewed direction(s).

Anthologies are a great way to discover new authors (well, new for the reader anyway). They offer a buffet of stories, so a well-done anthology should contain some stories that, despite being well written, are not what one may normally read. "Return of the Sword" does this job in superb fashion. It is full of great stories with wondrous variety. I wanted to discover more contemporary S&S authors/styles and am well satisfied. Some of my personal favorites I marked to re-read are:
-Wyrd of War (Bill Ward)
-The Last Scream of Carnage (Phil Emery)
-To Be A Man (Robert Rhodes)
-The Hand that Holds the Crown (Nathan Meyer)
-The Red Worm's Way (James Enge)
-The Mask Oath (Steve Goble)
-Storytelling (E.E.Knight) was an entertaining but serious primer--nice addition.

Other reviews capture the synopses of all 21 stories well enough that I need not repeat them here. But to highlight the effectiveness of this anthology, I list three of my take-aways:

1)Author Discovered (for me): I was completely taken with Phil Emery's "The Last Scream of Carnage" (notably the editor's pick). It
was poetic like his "Fifteen Breaths" contribution to the "Demons: A Clash of Steel Anthology", and pushed the bounds of the genre a bit. The delivery may prove off-putting to many others; I had to read it twice to really absorb it all. RESULT: not only did I enjoy this author, I enjoyed his style enough to want to track down more of his work (I just ordered Emery's novel "Necromantra").
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again