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The Revealers Paperback – August 30, 2011


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 9
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Square Fish (August 30, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312563744
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312563745
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #150,051 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 5-7-Russell Trainer, a seventh grader at Parkland Middle School, is being bullied. After a particularly bad episode, he reaches out for help to another boy who is the target of daily bullying at school. The two new friends notice that there's also a girl being harassed, and the three join forces to create a place online for bullied kids to publish their stories via the school's Internet service. The Bully Lab becomes a way for them to give voice to their feelings without the fear of being ridiculed. But when one of the bullies plays a prank on the trio, the principal calls an end to the email forum for fear of being sued. Russell and his friends prevail in the end, with a satisfying closure to the story. While the plot is predictable, Doug Wilhelm's honest story (Square Fish, 2011) will resound with kids who have experienced similar situations. Jon Toppo's narration lacks consistency, making it difficult to follow the characters when more than one person is speaking in a scene. Listeners will find it a challenge to connect to and stay with the audio version.-Lyn Gebhard, Sparta Public Library, NJα(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

From Booklist

Gr. 4-6. Wilhelm takes a fresh path down some well-trodden territory in this book about bullying. Seventh-grader Russell, who is being physically terrorized, reaches out to a geek named Elliot and to Catalina, who has incurred the wrath of seventh-grade queen Bethany and her minions. The kids first become friends and then devise a way to use the school's pilot project e-mail system to tell their stories--and the stories of other kids who are subject to regular bullying. Readers will identify with many of the elements Russell talks about in his earnest first-person narrative: the impotent anger; ineffectual parents; obtuse teachers who smile at the wrong kids. The plot structure is readily apparent, so it's no surprise when the kids' publication causes trouble or when the heavily foreshadowed science fair redeems the trio. Readers won't mind, though; books like this make them feel less alone. Ilene Cooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The Revealers should be required reading in the literacy curriculum of middle school students.
TJ Ludwig
This book kept me reading from begining to end and just when I thought I knew what was going to happen next,it suprised me!
girly_girl8887
My teenage daughter and I highly recommend this book not only for middle school students, but for parents and teachers.
Rebecca K. Carlson, Assistant Director, Center for Prevention & Counseling

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By girly_girl8887 on May 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
I was browsing the book store when I came upon this book,after reading through a few pages and looking at the description on the back it seemed like a fairly predictable, boring, book that I would read the first few pages uninterested and move on to something else. Because, I must admit, I thought that it would be another cheesy story with dull,flat characters written by a adult who had no real idea of what kids were like.Although skeptical, I decided to buy it because the other book I was consindering was too expensive and I figured if I didn't like it, I didn't spend alot of money on it.After reading farther into the book I knew I had definetly understimated it.This book kept me reading from begining to end and just when I thought I knew what was going to happen next,it suprised me!

The story begins with the main character,telling his experience with another classmate who is constantly bothering him and giving him trouble.One day he tries to figure out how he can stop him and meets two kids,who are middle schoolers,and who are being teased, harassed, and overall humiliated by these bullies. Each of these kids are different but they all have one thing in common; they don't want to tolerate it any longer.Determined and united they try to stop them from taking over the school! Since they later find out,that other kids are dealing with this problem too.One of the main reasons I liked this book was because of the lessons it taught.

This story really showed that kids have the power to stand up to their peers.It also showed that kids don't have to let anyone treat them badly because they have a choice and they have the power to speak up.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By PSW on March 9, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As a high school teacher with twenty-eight years of experience, I have found myself drawn to young adult fiction as a way to engage reluctant readers. The most successful books I have found are those that deal with social issues directly affecting student lives: prejudice, racism, substance abuse, or domestic/ sexual abuse. I just finished teaching Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak to my seniors and every single student was successful because they all identified with at least one of the characters Ms. Anderson created--she was inside their world and they can spot a fraud in a minute.
The Revealers is just such a book. Every page and chapter rings true with the angst, isolation, drama, confusion, and humor of middle school kids trying to find their way through the cruel and complex social order of early puberty. Some bewildered kids are clueless as to how they fell out of favor; some "nerds" have simply accepted their fate and learned how to stay out of the crossfire; and the few and powerful "alpha males" and "queen bees" are already wielding their social power with diabolical and menacing accuracy.
Doug Wilhelm's extensive research and work with middle-schoolers has paid off in the authentic voice of this short and powerful work. Not only are the scenarios recognizable to anyone who has suffered through middle school (or suffered through raising middle-schoolers), but the technology that permeates the novel is realistic as kids post messages, use Kidnet (the school's local area network), and "instant message" each other in ways my generation still can't quite grasp. We watch in awe as three kids, empowered by their intelligence, use technology to "out" the bullies in their own backyard: Darkland (a.k.a. Parkland) Middle School.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Tom Chamberlain, M.Ed, Middle School Counselor on October 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I'm so impressed with this book! As a school counselor of 30 years, I'm amazed at the sensitivity and accuracy of Wilhelm's portrayal of the pain of bullying! The story line is realistic and curiously suspensful as it portrays the childrens' struggle to extricate themselves from the victimization of the bully. There's no quick fix in this story; instead Wilhelm incorporates his hours of interviews with actual students to weave a theme of self-awareness from the vantage point of both bully and victim.
Excellent reading for students, teachers and parents!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
To Doug Wilhelm:

Today I checked The Revealers out from our school library. I thought it was going to be just another novel about the lives and troubles of kids. But it wasn't. I discovered a message. The book you wrote is powerful, and it made me think. About how better our world could be if we just said the truth. About how bullying is not just one kid picking on another.

Because bullying leaves scars. On your heart, and in your head. You begin to believe that just because this one person harasses you, your life will be miserable. And then you stop trying to stand up for yourself, to fight back.

I completely agree with what Turner said about isolation. Isolation started it all. Except that I understood it in a different sense. I believe that one of the most important keys to bullying is isolation. You keep them away from their friends, just for a few minutes and they're helpless. That's the way it is in modern society. I also agree with what Elliot said about traveling in a pack and how it's safer. You straggle away from your herd of pals, and *CHOMP* the bullies isolate and destroy you, just like what you would see in a video game.

Your book inspired me to try out the same project in my school. I wondered, will the results be higher or lower because it's an elementary school? Will the stories be different?

I think everyone should read your book. Because they will understand it, no matter what. Your book is so inspirational, so deep that I could cry. Thank you, for writing such a good book.

Doha, Qatar
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