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The Rhine Crossings 1945 (Campaign) [Kindle Edition]

Ken Ford , Howard Gerrard
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

'The last great heave of war,' according to Churchill, took place with the crossing of the Rhine in 1945. No invading army had crossed this great river since Napoleon's in 1805, and the task fell to Field Marshal Montgomery's 21st Army Group. Opposing them were the forces of a failing fascist regime, including battalions of old men and boys, strengthened by several formations of crack troops, including paratroopers and Panzer Grenadiers.

This book details the devastating Anglo-American assault from Arnhem during World War II (1939-1945), starting with the battle of Arnhem, and leading on to the successful crossing of the Rhine and eventual breakout, and continuing with the advance across northern Germany. Including comprehensive details on all aspects of the operation, including the amphibious assault, airborne landings, special forces' attack and armored land battle, this book charts the history of the last great set-piece battle of the war, second in magnitude only to the Normandy invasion, that ultimately brought the defeat of Hitler's Nazi regime one step closer.


From the Trade Paperback edition.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"The history of these last battle strongholds comes to life in a survey filled with black and white vintage photos and detailed discussions of crossing tactics and logic." -The Bookwatch Midwest Book Review

"...superbly illustrated by Howard Gerrard and period photographs, making for a most well rounded book on the subject. Not all that much has been written about the Rhine crossings, but it was a fascinating and well executed campaign that let to the end of WW2 in Europe. A superb read and one that I do recommend to you." -Scott Van Aken, modelingmadness.com (January 2008)


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Review

"The history of these last battle strongholds comes to life in a survey filled with black and white vintage photos and detailed discussions of crossing tactics and logic." -"The Bookwatch Midwest Book Review"

."..superbly illustrated by Howard Gerrard and period photographs, making for a most well rounded book on the subject. Not all that much has been written about the Rhine crossings, but it was a fascinating and well executed campaign that let to the end of WW2 in Europe. A superb read and one that I do recommend to you." -Scott Van Aken, "modelingmadness.com" (January 2008)

Product Details

  • File Size: 2943 KB
  • Print Length: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (April 19, 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004J4X712
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,130,167 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Synthesis that Glorifies Montgomery April 14, 2007
Format:Paperback
For some readers, British Field Marshall Montgomery's crossing of the Rhine River in March 1945 would seem like the climactic moment of the Second World War. Yet for other readers, this campaign appears more of a foregone conclusion since the Germans lacked the ability to prevent the Allied crossings. This a priori impression will greatly influence the reader's impression of Ken Ford's The Rhine Crossings 1945, number 178 in Osprey's Campaign series. Overall, it is a satisfactory volume, although it is more the result of thorough synthesis of existing secondary works rather than original research. The reader's opinion of the Montgomery's skills as a general - at the core of this account - will also influence assessment of this volume.

In standard Osprey format, the author succinctly lays out the origins of the campaign and the development of each side's operational plans. In the section on opposing commanders, the author provides capsule biographies of 9 Allied and 8 German leaders; the inclusion of Crerar (not directly involved in the campaign) and von Runstedt (relieved weeks before the campaign) didn't make much sense. However, it is when the author gets to describing Montgomery that many readers may take umbrage. First, the author states that Montgomery was "Britain's most famous and well-loved soldier." Was Montgomery really more famous than the Duke of Marlborough, Wolffe or the Duke of Wellington? As for well-loved, Field Marshall Slim was selected by Sandhurst cadets in a post-war survey as the most respected British commander of the war, not Montgomery. The author then states that Montgomery "had accomplished many victories." Like what?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars THE RHINE CROSSINGS, 1945 October 25, 2010
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
THE RHINE CROSSINGS, 1945
KEN FORD
OSPREY PUBLISHING, 2007
QUALITY SOFTCOVER, $18.95, 96 PAGES, ILLUSTRATIONS, PHOTOGRAPHS, MAPS

As the Allies pushed across Europe and neared the Rhine River early in 1945, Hitler fumed at the widespread desertions and surrenders of his troops. The Rhine hadn't been crossed by an enemy since Napoleon did it in 1805. Hitler saw the Rhine as a "they-shall-not-pass" symbol of the steadfastness of the Third Reich. He approved orders that any commander who gave up a town or communications post was to be put to death. The order especially included the bridges across the Rhine. The campaign for the Rhine bridges began with the March 5, 1945, Allied capture of Cologne. The capture didn't give the Allies an avenue across the river because most of the city lies on the western bank of the Rhine and German troops destroyed the bridges in their retreat from the city. Patton's Third Army, reaching the Rhine near Koblenz, was similarly frustrated. But on March 7, 1945, as Patton planned an assault crossing with out a bridge, American troops found a bridge not yet blown-the Ludendorff Railway Bridge at Remagen. The passage of U.S. troops across this bridge began the Rhine crossings. Within days, Patton's Third Army crossed the Rhine at Oppenheim, south of Mainz. Allied ground and airborne forces continued to capture bridges with the help of air support. By March 23, 1945, the Allies had a bridgehead 35 miles wide and 12 miles deep. By the start of April, 1945, there were seven Allied armies across the Rhine. U.S. Army combat engineers (many of them black soldiers consigned to labor units under the U.S. Army's segregation policy) built more than sixty bridges-railroad bridges, highway bridges, and floating bridges of pontoons and rafts-acrossthe Rhine.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Ken Ford's THE RHINE CROSSINGS: 1945 covers the last major battle of World War II in a region which no invading army had crossed since Napoleon's forces. The history of these last battle strongholds comes to life in a survey filled with black and white vintage photos and detailed discussions of crossing tactics and logic.
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More About the Author

Ken Ford was born in Eastleigh, Hampshire, England a long time ago. He left North End Secondary School in 1960 (I told you he was old). After three years in the Physics Department of Southampton University, he left to 'bum' his way around Europe ('bum' in this case meaning 'to drop out and live on the road'). He then became a telecommunications engineer in Southampton (to support his lovely wife Valda and daughters Amanda and Joanne) and spent 29 years at the pointed end until, in 1992, he became disillusioned with working for a living and opened a bookshop in Romsey, Hampshire. He also wrote books. He now lives in Southampton, drinks red wine (in moderation), annoys his three grandchildren Katelyn, Adam and Joseph and continues to write books (32 to date). Oh, and he also supports Southampton FC from his seat in the stands. That's about all there is to know about him.

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