Engineering & Transportation
The Rhino Records Story: Revenge of the Music Nerds and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $5.57 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Rhino Records Story: ... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: OVERNIGHT and 2-DAY SHIPPING AVAILABLE.....Like New condition. The item is in Amazon's warehouse and shipped to you by Amazon. You have the assurance that you will get your item in a timely manner. In the unlikely event something should go wrong with the shipping, you can contact Amazon to assist with the customer service, tracking or hassle-free return. We are very proud to be in this program as it allows us to offer the best customer experience possible.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.10
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Rhino Records Story: The Revenge of the Music Nerds Hardcover – October 22, 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.38
$13.12 $13.12

Music Biographies, Memoirs & Criticisms
Browse featured books on Joni Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix, the Grateful Dead, and other music legends. Learn more
$19.38 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Rhino Records Story: The Revenge of the Music Nerds + Monkee Magic: a Book about a TV Show about a Band
Price for both: $33.74

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Harold Bronson co-founded the Rhino Records label, and co-ran the company with Richard Foos for 24 years. Rhino has been considered the best reissue label in the world, and for a number of years was awarded label of the year by the record retailers organization NARM. He also oversaw the Rhino Films, executive producing such features as Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas, starring Johnny Depp. Bronson has written about pop music for the Los Angeles Times, L.A Free Press, and Rolling Stone.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the New Digital Design Bookstore
Check out the Digital Design Bookstore, a new hub for photographers, art directors, illustrators, web developers, and other creative individuals to find highly rated and highly relevant career resources. Shop books on web development and graphic design, or check out blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the design industry. Shop now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: SelectBooks; 1 edition (October 22, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590791282
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590791288
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 1.4 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,065,659 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By framo on November 16, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I liked this book a lot. If you've ever been possessed by an audacious idea that won't go away, you'll probably like this book, too. Harold Bronson and his partner Richard Foos acted on their idea. It was crazy: "Let's start a record company!" Kind of like "Hey kids, let's put on a show!" * And like Mickey Rooney, they succeeded.

The late great Rhino Records store on Westwood Boulevard in L.A. offered comfort and shelter. No incomprehensible industry hype, just music you liked or didn't like. Music you could like because it was cool, or because it was uncool. You could have passionate arguments with staff and customers about whether the Bonzo Dog Band was brilliant or unlistenable. And whatever your position, you would be right.

It all flowed from proprietors Bronson and Foos, who championed what they liked. They grew up enamored of novelty records like "Purple People Eater," and loved underdogs. They had an ear for talent, whether it was recognized or not. They would buy any used record, even if for only five cents. They got attention with quirky and funny promotions (Hassle the Salesman Contest for only offering you five cents; Deface the Glen Campbell Poster). Celebrities (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) and famous musicians (Bryan Ferry) frequented the store and future famous musicians (Nels Cline, jazz department, now with Wilco) worked there. They bought independent releases by unknown artists because they liked them -- they sold 400 copies of Devo's first two singles, more than any other store.

So when Bronson and Foos started a record label, it reflected their iconoclastic sensibilities. Fittingly, their first album release was by Wild Man Fisher, an annoying street musician who was persona non grata at most local stores but celebrated at Rhino Records.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kenichi Sugihara on December 4, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Fun read. Great stories. Fascinating and informative top to bottom look behind the scenes of the music biz from an entertainingly contrarian point of view. Rhino Records was tremendously important to many serious music lovers, I'm glad to see that Mr. Bronson documented its history and his place in it for the public.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By ValzieA on December 11, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For those who grew up during the time when the record industry was beginning to replace its jeans and headphones with MBAs mostly lacking in any affinity, let alone affection for music, this is the book for you. Even if you are not specifically familiar with the music and cultural influence of The Monkees, The Knack, The Turtles etc, the building of a business starting from a single shop in Westwood Village to an international brand, primarily due to the sincere devotion to music and its creators, would be of interest if not inspiration to anyone who still believes that a true passion for any art form can be translated into a successful business.

Those back stories behind not only some of the music bands and artists such as Frankie Lyman and the teenagers, Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman of the Turtles, specific hits such as “My Sharona” (now selling real estate in L.A.) and “At This Moment”, as well as the expansion into films (“Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas”), as told by one Rhino brother, are engaging and well worth the read. It is risky to lay out one’s thoughts about decisions and actions of others in the business, as this Rhino brother did, but I believe it was done in such a way which confirms the whole point of a memoir, that this is his story from his perspective, and one of the major reasons Rhino became the brand known not only for quality product but for corporate ethicality, a model we are unfortunately not likely to see again in this industry in the near future.

Not to mention a fun read!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul Almond on February 19, 2014
Format: Hardcover
If you want to find out about the eccentric, fabulous corner of the world of Rock N Roll inhabited by the likes of Frank Zappa, the Turtles and Johny Depp, this is the book to buy. A fun fast read about the little record company that became the biggest and best of the purveyors of the classics of the bands that I personally loved (and probably you too). It tells you how the record business really worked during its glory days, the marketing/merchandising tricks of the era, the weird wonderful people that make up the world of music. I constantly said (to myself): I didn't know that! But now I do - and you should also, read the book, you'll love it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Leopold Stotch on July 4, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I was psyched about this book. I love music retail, in all its fantastic, eccentric, bygone glory. I love reissues - tracking down rights holders, remastering and restoring, packaging and annotating. And I love maverick music biz folks who do it their way.

The Rhino saga has all of this. And yet this book is a trainwreck.

For someone who was a rock critic at the outset, Bronson is an awful writer, with no sense of rhythm, pace, or unfolding a story. Whoever the editor was that brought this text to completion should be fired, as there is no shortage of clunky phrasing and repetitive syntax.

Bronson really should have had a co-writer. In addition to the issues above, it would address the goofy, nonsensical structure of this book. Reasonably intriguing elements - like early tales from the shops, formative reissues, etc. - are given relatively short shrift, and yet their are interminable chapters about the history of Tommy James (doesn't he have his own book?) and the Knack (what???). Basically, it's the Harold Bronson story, NOT the Rhino Records Story, as the jacket claims.

Discussions of Bronson's dabbles into film and television aren't as fascinating has he thinks they are, and he doesn't have the writing skill necessary to make the endless corporate politics of the WEA music group seem anything close to riveting. He spends a whole chapter on a Rhino TV movie based on the Monkees, but barely talks about how they licensed and expanded the Monkees' catalog, which to me is much more important.

Not exactly a waste of time, but this really could have been a fun book about an era in the music business where reissues of Rhino's quality were a truly revolutionary concept...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Rhino Records Story: The Revenge of the Music Nerds
This item: The Rhino Records Story: The Revenge of the Music Nerds
Price: $19.38
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?