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The Rich Get Richer and The Poor Get Prison: Ideology, Class, and Criminal Justice (9th Edition) Paperback – August 8, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0205688425 ISBN-10: 020568842X Edition: 9th

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The Rich Get Richer and The Poor Get Prison: Ideology, Class, and Criminal Justice (9th Edition) + The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America (The Wadsworth Contemporary Issues in Crime and Justice Series)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Pearson; 9 edition (August 8, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 020568842X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0205688425
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #236,735 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jeffrey Reiman is the William Fraser McDowell Professor of Philosophy at American University in Washington, D.C. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1942. He received his B.A. in philosophy from Queens College in 1963, and his Ph.D. in philosophy from Pennsylvania State University in 1968. He was a Fulbright Scholar in India during 1966–1967. He joined the American University faculty in 1970, in the Center for the Administration of Justice (now called the Department of Justice, Law and Society of the School of Public Affairs). After several years of holding a joint appointment in the Justice program and the Department of Philosophy and Religion, Dr. Reiman joined the Department of Philosophy and Religion full-time in 1988, becoming director of the Master’s Program in Philosophy and Social Policy. He was named William Fraser McDowell Professor of Philosophy in 1990. He is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi honor societies, and past president of the American University Phi Beta Kappa chapter. In addition to The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison: Ideology, Class, and Criminal Justice, Dr. Reiman is the author of In Defense of Political Philosophy (1972), Justice and Modern Moral Philosophy (1990), Critical Moral Liberalism: Theory and Practice (1997), The Death Penalty: For and Against (with Louis P. Pojman, 1998), Abortion and the Ways We Value Human Life (1999), and more than 60 articles in philosophy and criminal justice journals and anthologies. He is also coeditor, with Paul Leighton, of the anthology Criminal Justice Ethics (2001).

 

Paul Leighton is a Professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology at Eastern Michigan University. He received his B.A. in Criminal Justice from the State University of New York at Albany in 1986, and is indebted to Graeme Newman for helping to direct him away from law school to the Justice, Law and Society program at American University. While at American University, he met Jeffrey Reiman and assisted with revisions of the fourth edition of The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison. He has worked on every edition since then. Dr Leighton received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Justice from American University in 1995. He has been the North American Editor of Critical Criminology: An International Journal, and was named Critical Criminologist of the Year by the American Society of Criminology’s Division on Critical Criminology. Dr. Leighton is the co-author of Punishment for Sale (with Donna Selman, 2010) and Class, Race, Gender and Crime (with Gregg Barak and Jeanne Flavin, 2nd edition, 2007). He is also coeditor, with Jeffrey Reiman, of the anthology Criminal Justice Ethics (2001). In addition to his publications, Dr Leighton is webmaster for StopViolence.com, PaulsJusticePage.com and PaulsJusticeBlog.com. He is Vice President of the local chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and is Vice President of the Board of SafeHouse, the local shelter and advocacy center for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Stephanie on March 19, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While some reviewers seem to be viewing this book as an attack against the rich in a conspiracy to put poor people in prison, it is not. I had to read this book for a Criminology class and I found it to be a wonderful addition to the reading material I was already studying. This book does not claim to cover all the factors that contribute to crime, but it is a new way to look at the way that our criminal justice system works against the poor.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Marlee on November 28, 2012
Format: Paperback
Before I read this book, I was one of those people who thought the prison system wasn't tough enough. After I read this book for a philosophy class, my opinion changed. I was made aware of how flawed our justice system really is, and how it should be improved. The authors support their beliefs with statistics and studies. I can't say that I agree with every single point they make, but I definitely believe that this book was vital to my college career. It is an easy read, as well. I took off one star because I think the authors could have suggested more ways to improve the judicial system.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Truth on June 7, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Awesome book! What studies have shown about human behavior mismatch with policies that have been created to deal with crime.
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By vera nard on September 23, 2014
Format: Paperback
good book
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