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The Right Frequency: The Story of the Talk Giants Who Shook Up the Political and Media Establishment Paperback – August 1, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-1933909172 ISBN-10: 193390917X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: History Publishing Company, LLC; 1 edition (August 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193390917X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933909172
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,073,655 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The influence on the political landscape of Limbaugh, Glenn Beck, Sean Hannity and their long line of conservative predecessors is the subject of Lucas s book, which explores the history of talk radio in America. ... Lucas leans heavily right in his assessment of commentators throughout radio history whose names H.V. Kaltenborn, Walter Winchell, Father Charles Coughlin, Fulton Lewis, Jr. Billy Hames Hargis, Joe Pyne, Bob Grant -- may or may not ring a bell. ... Lucas does an excellent job of describing the history and impact of the so-called Fairness Doctrine adopted as part of the 1934 Communications Act; but it was never really a law" but a rule adopted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)." --Prairie Fire

Fred Lucas not only delineates the roots of talk radio as a venue for communicating conservative political thought in the 1930s and 40s, he explains how it has become, in the 21st century, the life force for the conservative movement and the voice for conservative ideals on the current political landscape. Anyone who loves talk radio will love this book." --Mark Levin, Best Selling author, Talk Show Host

"Lucas' love and knowledge of talk radio is evident and will appeal to any fan of the medium." --Publishers Weekly

So your burst of sanity from the media world comes from listening to Rush or Sean or Mark or Laura or Glenn or a whole host of others? This is the book that explains the history of talk radio (it goes back further than you think) and explains how it got to be the lifeline to so many millions of Americans. If you re interested in the personalities, the history and the impact of talk radio, Fred Lucas has the story. --The American Spectator

From the Inside Flap

This is the story of conservative Talk Radio, the phenomenon that has galvanized a sizable segment of the American population previously without presence in the public forum.

American politics was transformed from the time a WABC manager told Rush Limbaugh, "You're kidding yourself if you think we'll ever carry your national show," to the day an establishment Republican senator griped "talk radio is running America."

Limbaugh ignited a new generation of talkers such as Sean Hannity and Glenn Beck who helped define the Conservative movement, but Rush can't take all the credit. The story begins much earlier with Walter Winchell and Bob Grant, two founding fathers who opened the microphone for others.

The extensively researched story of this potent force that changed the nature of political action brings a dimension to the fascinating individuals who brought a new energy to the American radio waves and in the process propelled the Conservative movement into the political force it is today. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Fred Lucas is the White House correspondent for TheBlaze and is also a contributing editor for Townhall Magazine. He previously reported for CNSNews.com and has written for The Weekly Standard, The American Spectator, Human Events, The Washington Times and the New York Post.

Before going to Washington, he reported on state capitols in Kentucky and Connecticut. He earned his Master's at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and Bachelor's at Western Kentucky University.

He lives in Fredericksburg, Va. with his wife Basia.

Customer Reviews

Very informative, interesting and definitely worth reading.
Angela Ortberg
I don't know if the print edition was like this or if this is just limited to the kindle edition but it really decreased my enjoyment of the book.
Adam
First and foremost the author, Fred Lucas, is a great story teller.
Rand McGreal

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By E. Hanks on August 7, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was informative, but still an easy light read with great anecdotes about some of my favorites like Glenn Beck, but also the early guys like Bob Grant and Barry Farber who laid the groundwork.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Angela Ortberg on August 14, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone. It's not really political, it's primarily a good historical account of talk radio from it's beginnings. It also discusses the Fairness Doctrine. Very informative, interesting and definitely worth reading.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Frank Briard on August 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
After hearing about this book on the Mark Levin Show,I ordered it and was very impressed. This is the best book I've read in years. If you like talk radio and would like some insight into it's past and future, you'll love this book. As Barry Farber said on his show, "Fred's the only one to get it right". Not only, is it a well researched, accurate history of talk radio but it's also fun to read. I couldn't put it down till I read the last word.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert Boog on March 19, 2013
Format: Paperback
I will admit freely that when it comes to politics - I am a party-switcher. I voted for both George W. Bush and Barack Obama so I am considered a "liberal" by my conservative pals and a "right-wing traitor" by my liberal friends.

The author of The Right Frequency, Fred Lucas is a self-proclaimed political junkie and right-winger. He is a political conservative. No bones about it.

No matter. When it came to reading Fred's book, I found myself arguing with his first chapter, but after that, the ride becomes much smoother and surprisingly enjoyable. Mainly because Lucas is such a polished writer. He reminds us that BEFORE the crop of current talk-radio stars led by Glen Beck and Rush Limbaugh.there were many HUGE radio/TV personalities such as Boake Carter, Joe Pyne, Bob Grant and George Putnam. The Right Frequency explains how these giants paved the way and talks about some of the important issues of those days.

Long story short: I enjoyed this trip to Conservative-ville. If you are a dyed in the wool right winger, you might like it even more than me.

For me, the book lacks a strong ending and as mentioned, the first chapter is a bit bumpy, but I do like Fred's writing style and so I give this book 4 out of 5 stars.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rand McGreal on March 12, 2013
Format: Paperback
First and foremost the author, Fred Lucas, is a great story teller. The book is the story of conservative talk radio from its origins to the current day. It is the story of a society learning to tolerate differences and new voices. As conservative talk radio slowly emerges and gradually gains a larger and larger following, its progress is challenged by the established political establishment. The author catalogues the growth of the industry and the actions of the political establishment to contain the growth. Although Fred Lucas does not hide his bias he manages a balanced historical telling of the events that shaped talk radio. At each stage of development the author provides a short biography of the main talk radio broadcasters of the period. Each decade of talk radio's growth included a struggle to survive forces that wanted to suppress the growth of the industry.
The author describes the fascinating history, strange alliances and lengthy legal challenges about what on the surface seems like a simple application of First Amendment free speech. It is apparent nothing is that simple. From the facts presented in this book it seems powerful politicians are able to contort even free speech concepts to align with their political affiliations. Although a topic like the history of talk radio could denigrate into a one-sided attack on liberal politicians, the author avoids this bias and simply presents the history of what occurred. Both sides are clearly represented with skill and nonjudgmentally.
This book works as a history book of the twentieth century through the microphone of talk radio. It also works as a case study of how powerful politicians use their power to shape society. But overall it is just a great story told well.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Doc Orman, M.D. on March 28, 2013
Format: Paperback
I admit I don't normally enjoy reading history or political books. They are either much too dry or much too contentious for me. However, The Right Frequency, by Fred Lucas, caught my attention, and I'm very glad it did.

This very informative, well-written, and well-researched book explains the history of talk radio in America, from its early beginnings in the 1930s until present day. It traces the roots of modern talk radio back to the earliest voices and other mass media influencers. The author's depth of knowledge is expansive, and he manages to create a historical text that is balanced, non-political, and entertaining.

There are great stories and anecdotes sprinkled throughout, such as those about Walter Winchell, who was popular when I was a youngster, but whom I never connected with modern talk radio until Lucas opened my eyes. A great read if you are a fan of talk radio and a good read even if you think it emanated from evil forces (which Lucas explains it didn't).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rock10 on February 28, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like the book up until the 1970's. The author provides information on radio hosts that have been given little attention, who broadcasted prior to the 1960's. The radio hosts of the 1960's are also profiled well. I believe the book should have ended with Rush. It wasn't necessary to go to the present. After the 1960's part of the book, I felt like I already knew what I was reading. Many of the hosts profiles were similar to their Wikipedia's. Overall, it was a great history of conservative talk radio, especially up until the mid-1960's. Maybe the author should have provided greater pages on the older radio hosts, instead of discussing hosts who are presently on the radio that we all know.
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