The Right to Privacy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $1.76 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 17 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Right to Privacy has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Right to Privacy Paperback – February 4, 1997

27 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.24
$3.35 $0.01
$15.24 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 17 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Right to Privacy + In Our Defense: The Bill of Rights in Action
Price for both: $28.65

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Coauthors of In Our Defense: The Bill of Rights in Action, Alderman and Kennedy here present a pithy and practical casebook on our shrinking right to privacy. The Fourth Amendment, protecting against unreasonable seizures, does not necessarily prevent an arrested person from being strip-searched, and the authors consider a welter of legal and ethical dilemmas involving the clashing interests of people who wish to be left alone and employers, police and the press, whose jobs may make them intrusive. The use of metal detectors and drug tests in schools and workplaces, women's right to abortion and contraception, people suing to squelch reporting by the media, patients' right to refuse further medical treatment or to undergo assisted suicide, and claims against voyeurs are among the issues and conflicts discussed. Also examined are new privacy conflicts arising in the workplace as employers, facing rising health insurance costs and increased liability for employees' actions, demand?and often obtain?more information about their workers. 100,000 first printing; BOMC selection.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

YA?Stories of individuals who have gone to court to protect their privacy rights are divided into six legally recognized interests. Extensive notes provide legal citations and, where appropriate, additional commentary. Students may be surprised by the limits of privacy rights, the variations in the law from state to state, and the differences in verdicts among seemingly similar cases. Readers may well be riveted to such narrations as that in Cooper v. Anderson (17-year-old Jeff Cooper's friends videotaped him having sex with Debbie Anderson, 19, without Anderson's knowledge or approval). Routine strip searches of women accused of such minor offenses as traffic tickets, right-to-die decisions, ownership of frozen embryos, drug interdiction, televised death, a school administrator's search of a student's pocketbook, and a forced Cesarean section performed on a terminally ill patient against the wishes of her family are all of likely interest to older students. Teachers may effectively choose excerpts to illustrate or elicit discussions. Students may find topics for further research, seek to clarify or advance their legal understanding, or just dip in for the stories.?Barbara Hawkins, Oakton High School, Fairfax, VA
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (February 4, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679744347
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679744344
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 1 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #282,369 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Barron Laycock HALL OF FAME on August 13, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Today, when voyeurs, marketers, and the curious are invading so many aspects of what has traditionally been considered the individual's inviolate personal domain, this book is a God-send in helping us understand what it is we have with the right to privacy, and also in helping us to focus on what is so much at risk. While the word "privacy" appears nowhere in our Constitution, a majority of Americans fervently believe that their right to privacy is a key element which is central to the way they live their public and personal lives, and that it is also key to the viability of the democratic system. Given the fact that it is a somewhat abstract, ambiguous, and difficult idea to define, privacy is indeed seen as being a critical and irreplaceable basic right of individuals.
In this wonderful, eminently accessible, and very readable book, Ellen Alderman and Caroline Kennedy, produce a gem of a work that offers a thoughtful, absorbing, and provocative overview of what the generally perceived (although not specifically Constitutionally defined) right to privacy means for us as citizens and individuals. Using a well-integrated series of landmark cases, trial decisions, and an entertaining plethora of anecdotal situations, the authors render this abstract, complicated, and critically important legal right much more understandable and comprehensible. As with their earlier book, "In Our Defense", Alderman and Kennedy transform the arcane legal language of various laws, regulations, and court decisions into relevant and compelling arguments that help the reader understand just how central to our basic liberties the right to privacy is.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Michelle M. on April 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book takes real people and cases to display the ways the right to privacy affects us in America today. The authors--one a public figure and the other not--show privacy issues dealing with the press, our body, law enforcement, the vouyer, and the work place. The authors make you think for yourself based upon decisions and cases that state and federal courts have heard in the past. I encourage anyone who is interested in their rights dealing with privacy to read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Bucherwurm on April 23, 1998
Format: Paperback
Many Americans adopt the concept that if they personally think something is right, then there must be an existing law that agrees. We think we have a basic right to privacy, but, surprise, we don't. Ms Kennedy, and Ms Alderman do a good job of presenting what rights we have, and, sad to say, what privacy rights are not guaranteed us.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book should be read by anyone who is concerned about the issues that surround our rights to privacy. Alderman and Kennedy review real-life court cases to show the audience how our laws come to be. The subjects that are focused on, are the police strip-search cases, school search cases, right to die cases, right to contraception cases, and privacy in the workplace to name a few. There is also a little segment on the issues of technology (the world wide web) and privacy. Kennedy is a very qualified person to write this book, because she grew up in the media glare having very little privacy herself, and understands firsthand what it is like to have a basic fundamental right violated. The right to privacy is a very serious issue in the United States. Alderman and Kennedy do a very fine job explaining how easily our basic fundamental right to privacy can be violated. I highly recommend this book as it is very easy to read and understand.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kate McMurry TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 29, 2001
Format: Paperback
In Chicago, a law dating from 1952 mandated that all women arrested there, no matter how trivial their crime, *must* be strip searched by prison matrons. Not only were most of the matrons brutal in carrying out this law, but male officers routinely secretly watched this degrading, humiliating, unconstitutional action via video camera--effectively turning every Chicago police station into a producer of rape pornography for the prurient delectation of its male staff. Tragically, it was not until the early 1980's that, with the assistance of the ACLU, this law was challenged in court by a handful of the thousands of women it had victimized, resulting in the state appellate court declaring it unconstitutional.
This and many other horrifying examples of privacy abuses in this country in the areas of law enforcement, the workplace and the press, among others, are detailed in The Right to Privacy. Alderman and Kennedy present shocking stories of ordinary citizens besieged by privacy violations in a non-sensational, clear and readable style that is highly accessible to ordinary people. At the same time, they give references to the case law pertinent to each situation, making this book useful for legal professionals as well.
In the wake of the events of 9/11 and currently pending legislature in Congress aimed at wholesale violations of the Fourth Amendment in the name of "public safety," a well-written, accurate book on privacy such as this one has become even more relevant than it was when it was written six years ago. I highly recommend it to everyone concerned with human rights--hopefully, every citizen in this country.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Right to Privacy
This item: The Right to Privacy
Price: $15.24
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com