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The Ring of Five Paperback – April 26, 2011


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 740L (What's this?)
  • Series: Ring of Five
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Bluefire; Reprint edition (April 26, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375846352
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375846359
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #673,338 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5–9—Danny Caulfield is a smallish boy with pixielike features. He is harassed and bullied at school and is generally ignored by his workaholic parents. He is given a chance to start over at a distant boarding school (a chance he does not want). A mysterious and surly cab driver delivers him not to the school chosen by his mother but to Wilson's Academy of the Devious Arts—a school for spies. It sits between two parallel worlds and is the only thing protecting the Upper World (ours) from the evil that has taken over the Lower World. The still-incomplete Ring of Five rules the Lower World with the help of the vicious Cherbs, to whom Danny bears a striking resemblance. With the academy's defenses weakening, Danny may be the Upper World's only hope. While The Ring of Five has tense, exciting moments and possesses the elements of good fantasy adventure, character development is spotty and the plot is uneven. On the whole, the story does not elicit the suspension of disbelief necessary for a good fantasy adventure. D. J. MacHale's "Pendragon" series (S & S) is a much better choice in this genre.—Anthony C. Doyle, Livingston High School, CA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

If you need a simple way to think of this book, it's Harry Potter, boy spy. It's hard not to make that comparison when Danny Caulfield is whisked from his home with an uncaring family to Wilsons, a magical boarding school dedicated to using spy craft in the fight between good and evil. Danny has no idea why he is there, but he is shocked to learn he is not who he thought he was. His resemblance to the wicked Cherbs, who have decided to take over all of the Lower World, makes him a valuable commodity. If the Wilsons crowd is not successful in holding off the bad guys, the Upper World, where humans live, could be destroyed as well. Like the Harry Potter books, the secondary characters add immensely to the richness of the narrative, and there's plenty of action, although the big final battle, surprisingly, drags. The book finishes with a cliff-hanger that will leave kids eager for the next title in this trilogy pitting one boy against a heavenly host. Grades 5-7. --Ilene Cooper --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 5 customer reviews
The book mainly takes place at a school for training spies.
Black see duck Dr
The book has a quick beginning and a super-fast can't wait to see what happens ending.
Teacherrates
I feel this book ranks up there with Harry Potter in the mythical-thriller category.
Jennifer Porras

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Porras on February 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Excellent book. I bought this book thinking it was an adult book. When I found out it was a young-adult book i was kinda dismayed but figure 'heck, i paid for it, im gonna read it.' And thank God I did! It was very exciting and keep moving right from the beginning. I hate books that take 15 chapters to explain the character and premises for stories but this book explains it all AS you go along.

If your a Christian (which I am) you have to look past all the mythical angelic stuff in this book. Its purely fiction people and no need to get upset saying its not accurate about angels and seraphim etc etc.

I feel this book ranks up there with Harry Potter in the mythical-thriller category. No gore, language, sex or descriptive violence. Great for parents and teens.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Very Merry Shakespeare on June 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Danny Caulfield had me at hello. This book takes me back to the time I first came across a young wizard with glasses who was heading to Hogwarts. However, with this main character - Mr. Caulfield - there is an extremely interesting twist.

When Danny was little (says his mother) he had to go through an operation that left him a bit different: His eyes are two different colors; he has slightly pointy ears; a sharp chin; and, a triangular-shaped face. Poor Danny isn't looking forward to the private school called Heston Oaks that his parents are making him attend this coming year. He wants to stay with the people he knows and not be sent to some strange school in the middle of nowhere. Of course, his parents don't even seem to care. His father is never home, and his mother rushes out every night saying she has an appointment and will see him later - which she never does.

One evening, an old black taxicab pulls up in front of Danny's house with a strange driver in the front seat; this is his ride to the school that's already scaring him to death. Through the night, the cab seems to fly - stopping only once at a checkpoint that feels to Danny as if he is entering a third world country and has to go through security in order to make it to the other side. When the journey finally comes to an end, they pull up in front of a huge castle decorated with moss-covered urns, moldy buttresses, and old, rusty statues of strange beings staring down at him through the ancient ivy.

Soon, Danny is shown around and introduced to the man running the joint - Master Devoy, and his "helper," Marcus Brunholm. Turns out that this "school" is actually a school for the teaching of...wait for it (I love this) an Academy for the teaching of devious arts.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Teacherrates on March 12, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Please understand that all my reviews focus on the interests of my middle school students. I never do a full plot synopsis in a review.

I loved McNamee's Navigator series, and I think this new series is going to be just as good as it goes on; the first book falls just short of five stars for reasons I will list in this review. I just want to say up front that I think subsequent books will be better now that he has set everything up.

The book centers around Danny Caulfield (a much, much better kid than that Holden from another book), a neglected boy who is picked on at school because of certain physical characteristics. His parents decide to send him to a boarding school in hopes that conditions will improve for him. His mom leaves him before the taxi arrives to take him to his new school; the ensuing ride in the taxi is whacked out crazy, and he is unceremoniously dropped off at the front door of the wrong school--a place called Wilsons Academy of the Devious Arts. In short, it is a school for teaching the trade (spying). More surprisingly, the school was expecting his arrival.

While that may sound like the beginning of a really dorky, implausible plot line, you will have to trust me that such is not the case. McNamee creates an amazingly believable world in which just such a school would be necessary. The plot has more twists and turns than a roller coaster, but it is fairly easy to follow. Character development is not great, but it is done well enough to believe in and like (or dislike) the characters.

The book has a quick beginning and a super-fast can't wait to see what happens ending. Unfortunately, McNamee has a lot to explain about the school and the world to which it belongs (which is not the world Danny had come from--the world you and I live in).
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book portrays a world that is very different from our own. It is controlled by spies who create webs of treachery and deceit to trick one another. The book mainly takes place at a school for training spies. Young Danny is abducted from his every day life and is then guilt tripped into becoming a spy at this school. He spends his time there learning about poisons, card playing, how to search houses, and Manny more useful things. He gets a bunch of useful stuff for his spy kit such as a coat that can turn into a tent, a knife that never misses, finger print powder, and a couple other usefully or not so usefully stuff. As he soon learns he is an important piece in a game of espionage in between to forces that are fighting for our world one is fighting for control and the other is fighting for life as we know it today. Danny must chose the side he is on because he has the power to decide who will win the epic struggle.
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