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The Rise of the Creative Class--Revisited: 10th Anniversary Edition--Revised and Expanded Hardcover – June 26, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0465029938 ISBN-10: 0465029930 Edition: Second Edition

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The Rise of the Creative Class--Revisited: 10th Anniversary Edition--Revised and Expanded + Who's Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life + The New Geography of Jobs
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; Second Edition edition (June 26, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465029930
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465029938
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 6.1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,081 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Author of the bestselling The Rise of the Creative Class and Who's Your City? Richard Florida is a regular columnist for The Atlantic. He has written for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Economist, and other publications. His multiple awards and accolades include the Harvard Business Review's Breakthrough Idea of the Year. He was named one of Esquire magazine's Best and Brightest (2005) and one of BusinessWeek's Voices of Innovation (2006). He lives in Toronto, Canada.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Marisol D'Andrea on June 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I read every single page. This revised edition of the book has been thoroughly revised with five new chapters. It departs from the original version of the 2002 book that the term Creative class has evolved. Florida explains that the term "used to mean artists and writers. Today, it means job stability" (p. viii), and contends that for prosperity and jobs to happen, there is a need to convert every job into a `creative job.' 'Every human being is creative' is the key thesis of "The Rise of the Creative Class Revisited," as in the original version of the 2002 book. With a clear and engaging message, Florida addresses his critics throughout the book and presents updated data from various scholars in the field to support his position.

The aim to capitalize `creativity' is powerfully argued in this book. Florida demonstrates that the Creative Class now comprises more than thirty percent of the entire workforce. But to his surprise, metros with the highest rank in Creativity Index, tended to have the highest level of inequality. He addresses these perplexities later in the book. However, one thing is for sure, Working and Service Classes thrive in regions with high concentration of the Creative Class. Furthermore, the author stresses that the Creative Economy is not about capitalistic discourse; instead, it is about innovation, business and culture. He ascertains the recognition of the Creative Economy where creativity is the key driver of today`s economy, as creativity needs to be commoditized in lieu of being wasted; insisting that the key task of the future must be to fully engage the creative talents of ALL.

The author speaks to the issues of inequality as well.
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Format: Hardcover
As I heard the account, one of Albert Einstein's colleagues at Princeton once pointed out to him that he asked the same questions on his final examination each year. "Yes, that is true. Each year, the answers are different." I thought about that incident as I began to read this book because most (not all) of the major issues that Richard Florida addresses in the Original Edition (2003) are among those he revisits in this 10th Anniversary Edition.

As he explains in the Preface to the new edition, "the dawning of the Creative Age has ushered in a newfound respect for livability and sustainability. This, too, is part and parcel of the deeper shift. The quest for clean and green is powered by the same underlying ethos that drives the Creative Economy. Where the green agenda is driven by the need to conserve natural assets, the Creative Economy is driven by the logic that seeks to fully harness - and no longer waste - human resources and talent." Most of the same trends, patterns, shifts, etc. that Florida identified a decade ago continue, their expansion driven by diversity and inclusion that are both moral imperatives and economic necessities. Each contains an abundance of opportunities and perils.

However, that said, "all is far from well: the great promise of the Creative Age is not being met." Florida adds, "We are in a strange interregnum when the old order has collapsed and the new order is not yet born.
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22 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Mark bennett on June 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Richard Florida is a successful con-man whose business is selling dreams to cities. But whereas Professor Harold Hill in the "music man" saved towns by selling them musical instruments, Florida promises to make your town the next Silicon Valley if you just follow his simple formulas.

He went around the country to trendy places with lots of technology jobs, looked around, and then decided their success was based on what he observed. Not very scientific, but the idiots he is selling this stuff to don't know up from down.

Reality in these matters is three or four things matter:

1) High quality local univerities pumping out graduates
2) An existing base of established large companies providing technology jobs (inertia wins)
3) Good schools
4) A enterprenural class in the community willing to spend their time and money investing in technology.

A sidewalk cafe district with street musicians and all the cute little shops created from some ready-made blueprint will make your city seem like "main street USA" at Disneyland. And if your goal is to attract affluent tasteless goons downtown, it will work well. But its not going to turn your city into Silicon Valley.

In this updated version of the book, he offers analysis of his "creative class" in the aftermath of the economic crisis of 2008. He offers his views on race and gender within his creative class as well.

His definitions of the "creative class" remain as fast and loose as ever.

Karl Marx wanders around the book as well. There are some really weird bits like the reach to Marx comparing the "creative class" to the "universal proletarian", talking about creative occupations as inherently collectivist.
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