The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government: Abridged for the Modern Reader Hardcover – June 1, 1971


See all 29 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$87.74 $24.97
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
--This text refers to the Kindle Edition edition.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 573 pages
  • Publisher: Gloucester, Peter Smith; Abridged edition (June 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0844600741
  • ISBN-13: 978-0844600741
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.7 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,084,857 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

A must read for the serious historian.
John R. Olson
Jefferson Davis makes a compelling legal argument regarding the inherent right of a state to secede from the Union.
cruise
Maybe it would have been more interesting if it hadnt been so darn long, as that made it quite boring.
Tilly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By John R. Olson on February 16, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Constitutional issues are explored in depth. This is not a book about the various battles of the Civil War but an in depth analysis of the causes and the philosophy. A must read for the serious historian. Originally this was in several volumes but Kindle has combined all into one. Superb!!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Alan F. Sewell on August 25, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Jefferson Davis is one of the enigmas of our history. His epitaph might read something like: "The Failed Leader of the Lost Cause." He is generally portrayed as a crotchety old man of bad temper whose constant feuding with subordinates over petty issues distracted the Confederacy during its fight for life. Sam Houston famously said, "A drop of Jeff Davis' blood would freeze a frog."

And yet the Southern people chose this man above all others to be their President. He seems to have been enormously well respected in the South for his military career in the Mexican War and for his efficient administration of the War Department during Franklin Pierce's administration. As a Senator he was admired for his logic and oratory. Most Southerners who knew him spoke and wrote well of him. Those few who actively despised him were known for stirring up controversies themselves.

No question but that Davis was a complex character. He was no rabid Yankee-hater. He loved every inch of the United States, including the Northern States. Before the war he was one of the few Southerners cheered by Yankee crowds when he spoke in Northern cities like Boston and Portland. He urged patience with the Union at a time when many Southern hotheads were agitating for secession. Yet he also believed in State Sovereignty, the theory that any state had the unquestioned lawful right to leave the Union at any time that a majority of its people decided that the Federal Government no longer suited them. In the end State Sovereignty trumped Davis' unionism. When Davis became convinced that the majority of Mississippians desired to leave the Union he became a leader of the Secessionists.

Despite presiding over a lost war, Davis remained immensely popular in the South until the end of his days.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By E. Q. Taft on January 24, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mr. Davis makes the case for state's rights about as well as I think it will ever be made. Much of the book he spends citing the arguments of the framers of the Constitution to demonstrate, to his own satisfaction at least: (1) that sovereignty lies with the several states; (2) that the Federal government is merely an agent created to act for the states in areas specifically designated in the Constitution; and (3) the framers themselves rejected the idea that the Federal government should have a means of coercing the states, and states definitely had the right to secede if they felt their interests were no longer being served by being part of the Union. I would almost buy into this, but I still find it disturbing that the major incidents in our history where we've battled over state's rights have been on the rights of states to practice slavery and resist school integration.

Davis also spends a good deal of time defending his own record during the war, in particular the charges that he interfered with the decisions of his generals in ways; he gives the text of many letters written to, by, or about him. This is all quite interesting, though he does come across as almost being -too- defensive.

One very interesting section deals with the logistics issues the Confederacy faced, particularly in supplying arms and ammunition to its soldiers; the south started with almost nothing in the way of a munitions industry, and had to build it from the ground up and with the Union blockading much of its foreign trade. Its success in this area at least is something I think any American can feel proud about, not too dissimilar from the way our industrial based met the challenge of the second world war.

The book ends rather abruptly, however, in the middle of the war.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By T. Cole on March 18, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This lays out the southern defense in good detail, refuting the arguments used by the north prior to, during, and since the civil war. It clearly was not the single issue conflict we have been taught.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Phillip J. Moore on May 30, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
This was a good but at times tedious read. Davis talks about his beliefs about why the Civil War began and why the south was justified. Davis clearly had given this a lot thought. Davis also discusses many of the political issues of the day including the administration of the war, financing the war, taxation, etc.. Readers of the book should enjoy legal and constitutional theory. If you don't this could be an impossible read. I read the entire book less the appendixes. The text is about 65% of the book. The balance are appendixes which are mostly copies of speeches.

Based on the book, I concluded that Davis was a whiner: It just was not his fault. He never asked to be President. Others did follow his orders. And, Lincoln did not fight fair. Davis seemed to remember every slight and blame cast his way. Davis did not accept the adage "The buck stops here." He also seemed to be unable to see events through the eyes of his enemy. I came away wondering if the south had a better leader that Lincoln would have had a tougher time.

I do recommend this book for civil war buffs. It was well written and Davis was obviously well educated.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search