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  • The Rise & Fall of ECW: Extreme Championship Wrestling (WWE)
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Product Description



Purple. 100% cotton. Screen printed in the USA. Imported.

Product Details

Size: Medium
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 0.9 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • ASIN: 1416510583
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,602,767 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

A great companion piece to the Rise and fall of ECW DVD.
ECW Fan
Delve into other aspects of ECW... I'm quite disappointed in the fact the book is nearly verbtium from the DVD.
Matthew Ziemba
I could write a really long review on this book, but I'll condense it really quickly to save you the time: 1.
C. Lindsay

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Andrew M. Walsh on May 29, 2006
Size Name: Medium
This books seems rushed. Rushed probably to coincide with WWE's rebirth of ECW. It reads like a transcript of last years DVD of the same name, thrown in are full results from all the supercards from 1993 til closing. That's all. There's really nothing new written for the book. The "Hardcore History" book that came out a few months ago reads so much better. It really captures the "outlaw" history of the organization, with lots of stories I hadn't heard before. There were a few errors in the book, (probably edited by a non-wrestling fan) and even captions of pictures are mis labled... "Sabu" looks a lot like Eddie Gilbert!?!

If you've seen the DVD, don't waste your time with this re-hash. If you really want to know about the product ECW, get the other book. Really dissapointing because WWE has really put out some great autobiographys and "legends" DVD's. Compared to their prior products, this really sucks.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By C. Lindsay on August 25, 2006
Size Name: Medium
I loved ECW. So everytime a dvd or book comes out about ECW, I do a double take. I could write a really long review on this book, but I'll condense it really quickly to save you the time:

1. Thom Loverro may be a respected and longtime journalist, but he obviously knows nothing about ECW. He can't even decide if the name is Mike "Nova" Bucci or Mike Nova. The writing style is drab and reads like someone took a pile of notes and threw them on a page, then made barely-conscious transitions.

2. It's a dvd rehash. That was obvious from the beginning but I was hoping it would provide something interesting. I was wrong. If you have the dvd there's no point in reading this.

3. The innacuracies are frustrating. One would think at least one fact-checking session could have been devoted to this. Taz is even labeled as Mikey Whipwreck. Small children, after watching one show featuring the two, could have noticed there's a difference.

I would have given my eyeteeth to recommend this book and I rarely consider reading even the silliest books to be a waste of time, but this really was a waste. It's sloppy, badly put-together, many times inaccurate and totally devoid of any real passion. If you really want to read it try to check it out at a library.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Ziemba on August 6, 2006
Size Name: Medium
What can I say. I had some pretty high hopes for this book, perhaps show some more than what the DVD did. Delve into other aspects of ECW...

I'm quite disappointed in the fact the book is nearly verbtium from the DVD. Entire chapters are transcribed from the DVD.

They did however go into some things that the DVD didn't cover. Mostly how Paul E. got into the buisness and some info on the 'Mass Transit Incident'. But beyond that it falls very flat.

If you are a completist, buy the book and enjoy it. If you have the DVD and aren't a completist, save your money.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Diesel Decent on August 12, 2006
Size Name: Medium
I was so happy when this book came out. I thought that it would contain detailed behind the scenes stories about the little promotion that could. I wanted dirt and sleeze. Instead on page 64, "Sabu and Tazz defeated the Pitbulls; Tommy Dreamer beat Stevie Richards..." This goes on for awhile, and is repeated over and over again. Here's the form of the book. In 1997 these matches took place at ECW shows. In June of that year Cactus Jack had a good match. Mick Foley puts it this way, "yeah that was great". Thank you Mick.

Oh but it gets worse! On page 77 the writer copy and pastes the whole page out of Have a Nice Day! Mick Foley's first book. I would be amazed if this guy took more than an hour to write this book. He copies match results which can be found dozens of places online or directly copies someone's quotes from previous books (like Foley) or from the Rise and Fall of ECW DVD (which was an amazing piece of work). It's hack writing to the EXTREME!

No matter how much time Loverro had on this project it was squandered. Give me the same amount of time and I'll write a five star book on ECW. Only recommended for a completist.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Pittman on May 13, 2007
Size Name: Medium
This book is very broad, and it caters mostly to the years when WWE wrestlers were at their peak in ECW. While that may have been ECW's "golden era," very little is covered about classic ECW matches in 1999 and 2000, with no mention of Tajiri and Whipwreck as a team, the classic 3 way matches, or any of the later additions that helped keep ECW afloat. It also caters to a very small percentage of former ECW wrestlers, using just people under WWE contract, and the producer of ECW TV. In addition, there are glaring errors with spelling and grammar, and pictures with incorrect captions. It appears no one bothered to proofread this book. The book has some good stuff and somewhat captures what ECW was about, but it suffers from a lack of depth, especially with ECW after 1996.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Best Of All on June 27, 2006
Size Name: Medium Verified Purchase
The book is labeled a Media Tie-In, hence it coincides with the DVD that has the same title.

Simply, ECW was too small to become a national power and became too big to not meet its financial ruin. It was always one big financial deal from taking that giant step into the big leagues of WWE and WCW, but every turn was greeted with a brick wall.

That doesn't diminish the impact the group had on professional wrestling, but author Thom Loverro doesn't present the financial angle to the reader until the closing pages.

Throughout the chapters there is criticism of WCW for "stealing" talent while WWE had a reciprocal agreement to loan/share wrestlers, in particular during the years that Paul Heyman assumed full control of ECW.

I question this, as it seems that ECW talent was basically buried by both organizations, with wrestlers returning simply because their characters were nothing but jobbers with the "big two." It made the wrestlers appear to be damaged goods and certainly hurt ECW in expanding its audience.

For example, is there any difference with Shane Douglas becoming an obnoxious teacher of rasslin' and Justin Credible being squashed in WWE or Mike Awesome portraying a dopey 1960s beach bum and the fabulous Lucha Libre flyers losing their masks and high spots in WCW? These performers were all champions or those who had unbelievable main events in ECW before moving on (and, for some, returning to ECW).

For those who were fans of ECW, though, the book is a great read.

For the fans who are watching the "new" ECW for the first time, you will learn what made the product so exciting and controversial. And why it can never recapture that magic.
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