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The Rise and Fall of a Palestinian Dynasty: The Husaynis, 1700-1948 Hardcover – January 31, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press (January 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520268393
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520268395
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,687,163 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Pappé (A History of Modern Palestine) chronicles over two centuries of Palestinian history through the lens of a prominent clan who figured in all aspects of Palestinian life, from the early 1700s through the declaration of the state of Israel. Pappé's depiction of major historical events "through the eyes of the family and not just from an 'objective' historical perspective" creates an absorbing narrative that retains its integrity as an accurate scholarly account: he wisely resists imagining dialogue and other fiction techniques, instead presenting a straightforward account based on meticulous research. The ubiquitous presence of the Husaynis in Palestinian politics and communities is impressive, from Abd al-Latif, who "controlled every aspect of life in Jerusalem" in the mid-18th century; to Tahir al-Husayni II, a senior religious official who recognized Jewish immigration as a "threat" as early as 1897, when few were immigrating; to Abd al-Qadir, revered for his heroism during the 1948 massacres that cost him his life. With his fourth book on the region and his third about Palestine, Pappé has created a unique and enlightening chronicle of an influential family and the people whose lives they profoundly affected.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review

“A unique and enlightening chronicle of an influential family and the people whose lives they profoundly affected. “
(Publishers Weekly 2011-02-07)

“A fine book that is informed by the best scholarship and written with directness and celerity.”
(Weldon C. Matthews Journal Of World History 2012-10-10)

“An interesting narrative on the rise of the Husayni family to local leadership in Jerusalem.”
(Meir Litvak, Tel Aviv University Bustan: The Middle East Book Review 2012-11-14)

“Does not disappoint. . . . A balanced analysis based on solid research.”
(Janice J. Terry, Eastern Michigan University The Historian 2012-10-01)

Customer Reviews

Pity that the publisher didn't spot a large amount of typos and other silly mistakes.
Robby Ref
This is a great epic historical account of the family, from its formation as the "Husayni" family to its collapse as a nobility together with rest of Arab Palestine.
Guy Deutsch
In fact, many of his references seem to be little reliable, directing to other scholars or Arab politicians memoirs (rather than neutral or primary sources).
TomHarrington

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Kaplan on February 6, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This book had the potential to be truly groundbreaking, since its subject (the Husayni family) has never received the rich historical treatment it deserved. However, the work is extremely flawed in many respects. There are a myriad of problems: the colloquial narrative (“As we shall see”); clunky language; numerous unsubstantiated statements and claims; lack of citations; insertions of Pappe’s anti-Israeli opinions on 21st century events; and far too much foreshadowing of the post-World War II 20th century. Many people will find Pappe’s anti-Zionist bias tough to stomach. Pappe’s refusal to make distinctions about the other side (“the Jews” or “the Zionists”) is in marked contrast to his fine variegating between the different Palestinian Arab (and even British) societal elements. Similarly, he provides maddening sartorial detail about several Husaynis, but refuses to discuss their roles in or opinions on some of the major events of the day in mandatory Palestine. The lacunae and elisions are stunning. Nonetheless, the complicated Husayni family history is fascinating and Pappe does a great job detailing it, not to mention chronicling internal familial dynamics as well as battling amongst the Palestinian notables. He makes great strides in eradicating the demonic caricature of al-Hajj Amin Husayni and humanizing him. But overall, as far as academic books go, it is very poorly written and edited – I wonder how Berkeley let it through in this state of factual mistakes, typos, and non-chronological rambling. If his writing was an attempt to emulate his subjects’ seemingly limited and pained ahistorical grasp of the intricacies of the Zionist movement(s) and the modern world, well then, he has succeeded. Such stylistic motifs are best left to literature though, and not historical research.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TomHarrington on November 2, 2014
Format: Hardcover
pappe writes about a small dependant part (Palestine) of the large Ottoman Empire, without having consulted any Ottoman archives or Turkish sources (0 references). Moreover, according to his endnotes, he only spent little time in the local archives (Haram) ignoring thus substantial sources. In fact, many of his references seem to be little reliable, directing to other scholars or Arab politicians memoirs (rather than neutral or primary sources). Ex. he decides, according to some unpublished report, the source to the Arab revolts in the 1920s, despite (that is, ignoring) all other strikingly clear evidences. Not inclusive enough and somewhat distorting hence the one star (one must be demanding with 'history')
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Robby Ref on August 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Pappe has finally translated one of his first works. The history of the Husayinis is one that should be read by any scholar working on Palestine but it is also a pleasant reading for the occasional reader. Pity that the publisher didn't spot a large amount of typos and other silly mistakes.
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