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The Rise of the Image, the Fall of the Word Hardcover – October 8, 1998

ISBN-13: 858-0000034134 ISBN-10: 0195098293 Edition: 0th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (October 8, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195098293
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195098297
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 1.1 x 6.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,253,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

The Information Revolution is upon us. The world of the printed word is dying, and moving images are gaining ground. MTV, Sesame Street, and the old stand-by Laugh In have thrust "multiple fragments" of fast-cut images in our faces, and we enjoy, learn, and revel in them. Such is the philosophy of Stephens (journalism and mass communications, New York Univ.), solidly explained and delineated with powerful insights into the classics of literature, film, and television. Although he foresees the "fall" of the printed word, Stephens says it will not be so bad. The "New Video" will bring us joy and great avenues for learning, teaching, and appreciating the world. As in his A History of News: From the Drum to the Satellite (LJ 10/15/88), Stephens paints a much broader picture of mass communication and where it is heading, citing examples such as Flaubert, Shakespeare, and even Ally McBeal. Easy to read and fascinating to think about, this is a keeper. Recommended for academic and larger public libraries.?Kay Bowes, Wilmington Inst. Lib., DE
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"This book is brave and insightful. Mitchell Stephens cares deeply about words and images. A thoughtful scholar of media, he takes us well past the cant, hysteria and rhetoric that shapes so many of our public discussions about technology and culture. Sometimes painfully and poignantly, but always honestly, he speaks to our fears about the onrushing Information Revolution and offers us some concrete ideas for surviving it."--John Katz, media critic and author of Virtuous Reality

"Filled with historical descriptions and sprinkled with amusing and startling images, Stephens' book provides an interesting perspective on the television/video age and its future."--Bloomsbury Review

"When writing and, later, print moved the word into visual space, the inwardness of the word was preversed because reading evoked sound from the interior of the reader--at first actual sound (early reading was normally aloud) and later imaginary sound. With today's widespread use of TV images and other images, space has more and more discarded text and communication has become more exteriorizing. The TV screen situates the viewer outside its visual image. But Mitchell Stephens sees hope in current developments such as our growing ability to use moving images that shift from perspective to perspective. This is an informative and challenging book."--Walter J. Ong, St. Louis University

"A terrific book coming out soon that will forcefully and brilliantly argue...that hyper video images are hurling us into a new cultural renaissance."--David Shenk, author of "Data Smog," in Hotwired

"A thoughtful scholar of media, Stephens takes us well past the cant, hysteria, and rhetoric that shapes so many of our public discussions about technology and culture. Sometimes painfully and poignantly, but always honestly, he speaks to our fears about the onrushing Information Revolution and offers us some concrete ideas for surviving it."--Jon Katz, media critic and author of Virtuous Reality

"A thoughtful and measured challenge, the kind of scholarship that helps push us forward."--American Journalism Review

"A fascinating, counterintuitive tour de force.... Stephens has created a different way of thinking about the sands that we feel shifting so quickly under our feet."--Wilson Quarterly

"This book offers a unique and refreshing perspective on wht has mostly been a one-sided debate over the linked fate of words and our culture."--Houston Chronicle

More About the Author

Mitchell Stephens published three new books, all of which he had been working on for many years, in 2014:

* Imagine There's No Heaven: How Atheism Helped Create the Modern World -- a history of atheism and its accomplishments (Palgrave Macmillan)

* Beyond News: The Future of Journalism - a historical argument for a wiser journalism, based on research at Harvard's Shorenstein Center (Columbia University Press)

* Journalism Unbound -- a call for journalism and journalism education to aim higher (Oxford University Press)

Professor Stephens is also the author of A History of News, an extended history of journalism that has been translated into four languages and was a New York Times "Notable Book of the Year." (A new edition was published by Oxford University Press in 2006.) His well reviewed book, the rise of the image the fall of the word, a historical analysis of our current communications revolution, was published in 1998 and is available from Oxford University Press.

In addition, Professor Stephens has written two textbooks: Broadcast News (now in its fourth edition), long the most widely used radio and television news textbook, and the co-author of Writing and Reporting the News (a third edition of this book was published in 2007 by Oxford).

He is a long-time professor of Journalism at New York University's Arthur L. Carter Institute and has served three terms as chair of the Department of Journalism there. In 2009 he was a fellow at the Harvard's Shorenstein Center, working on a project on the future of journalism.

Over the years, Professor Stephens has written numerous articles on media issues and aspects of contemporary thought for publications such as the Daedalus, New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post and the Columbia Journalism Review. He was one of five editors of the book Covering Catastrophe: Broadcast Journalists Report September 11 (Bonus Books). A new edition of this book will be published by the 9/11 Memorial.

In 2001, Professor Stephens completed a trip around the world, during which he reported on globalization for the public radio program "Marketplace" and the webzine Feed and wrote essays on travel for LonelyPlanet.com. His commentaries have aired on NPR's "On the Media." He has been history consultant to the Newseum.

Professor Stephens has been involved in a number of media development projects overseas since 1993 - including two large State Department University-Partnership Grants, which he directed, with Rostov State University in Russia. Professor Stephens has also taught or organized exchanges in Georgia, Ghana and India. He was director of the Russian-American Journalism Institute in Rostov.

In 2006, Professor Stephens won a grant from the Carnegie-Knight Initiative on the Future of Journalism Education for research on new models of journalism education.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Melinda McAdams on March 2, 1999
Format: Hardcover
For original thinking and stimulating ideas, this book ranks with _Understanding Media_ and _Orality and Literacy._ Stephens's reasoning is clear; his argument is elegantly constructed, fluid, logical; what's more, his writing flows, never stumbles, sometimes sings. A great pleasure to read for that as well as for its original ideas. I am recommending this book to everyone I know with an interest in media.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tom Dolle on December 20, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I teach a graduate design class, and this book is a great way to let students think about their role in the fast changing world of visual communications. Stephens has a great way of putting things in perspective, and notes that each fundamental change in communication has met with resistance, i.e. we still think of TV as the Boob Tube. When I read it a few years ago, it seemed so new--it's fun to see how his theories are quickly melding into our culture seamlessly. It's been an optional read for my students--now it's time to make it mandatory!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Matt Johnston on March 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
With TV viewing increasing, it is no wonder more people depend on television than books or newspapers. Mr. Stephens states that the image has not conquered the word yet, it may not happen at all, but he fears it will. Eloquently written and researched, with an excellent chapter 'thinking "above the stream"' that includes director Mark Pellington (Arlington Road). This book is especially useful for journalism students.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 2, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Although Stephen's writing style may make it difficult for the scholar to take him seriously (he sounds more like an Info-Age
geek than a academic), he presents some extrordinary ideas that shouldn't be ignored or overlooked. For example, his list of the new elements and principles of design spawned by Info-Age art
forms is revolutionary. A must read for the Info-Age artist,
art critic, social-critic, or art educator!
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