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The Roar Paperback – January 1, 2012


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 9
  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Chicken House; Reprint edition (January 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439927854
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439927857
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.3 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (125 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #184,376 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5–8—In a bleak future, humans use terrible chemicals to fight The Animal Plague that causes all of the world's animals to go rabid and renders most of the planet uninhabitable. The population now cowers in overcrowded walled cities. Mika, 12, and his parents live in London in terrible conditions. His twin, Ellie, supposedly drowned a year earlier, but Mika is convinced that she still lives. He's right. The story begins with Ellie and a tiny monkey named Puck fleeing a spaceship in a stolen Pod Fighter. Sadly, their attempt to escape is foiled by the evil Mal Gorman, who has a plan to co-opt the entire first generation of children born after the Plague and make them into an army for his own nefarious purposes. And Gorman has special plans for kids like Mika and Ellie, whose mutations give them unique abilities. To save his sister, Mika will have to win a contest involving simulator battle games and many deadly challenges, using abilities he never knew he had. The story starts fast and never slows down. While the bad guys are a bit stereotypical, the good guys are interesting and realistic. There's a touch of the supernatural, some interesting philosophical questions, and a cliff-hanger ending that will leave readers hungry for more. Give this one to readers not quite ready for Orson Scott Card.—Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"A hugely inventive and entertaining read which grabs the reader by the scruff of the neck from the first sentence. It flies along like a laser beam from a blaster and sustains the breakneck pace until the stunning climax. A fresh and exciting take on sci-fi..." -- Eoin Colfer

“Telepathically connected twins battle a totalitarian regime…Exciting, thought-provoking, and very hard to put down.” – The New York Times Book Review

“An exciting, suspenseful plot; this compulsive read should not be started at bedtime!”
– Kirkus Reviews

“An unusually gripping adventure…roars to a satisfying conclusion.”
– BCCB

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Customer Reviews

Hopefully there will be a sequel, because this book would be much better as part of a series rather than a stand alone.
Astro 599
I strongly recommend this book for all those out there who enjoy great Science fiction and good literature about futures that aren't so bright.
Tommy Walters
The story is fast-paced and entertaining, the characters are well developed and interesting, and the writing style is both easy and engaging.
Karen Joan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By John Bradley on October 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The Roar by Emma Clayton is a highly enjoyable read. It is in the same vein as the popular YA novels the Hunger Games and Catching Fire. The Roar is set in a dystopic future similar to some of the genre's great, classic predecessors. The Roar shares similarities to two of the greatest books in the genre: Brave New World and 1984. The main antagonist in the book has extended his life to an unnatural length taking pills conjuring Brave New World. Clayton's writing also strongly relates to 1984. Both books contain the themes of being separated by class; those who are ruled are on a frantic journey towards self identification. However Clayton's strongest influence is Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. The books share many similar themes that drive each respective novel towards a breathtaking conclusion.

Before the story begins, Ellie, one of our heroes has been kidnapped and imprisoned. The Roar roars off with Ellie and a Capuchin monkey in tow, barreling towards earth in a Pod Fighter. They cross the wall that extends across the entire northern hemisphere and race towards the United Kingdom at ridiculous speeds. They have escaped the evil Mal Gordon's satellite space station with the goal of seeing Ellie's family. Ellie was kidnapped by Gorman because of his suspicion of her "special" powers. Ellie is chased by goons, but the deadly twelve year old pilot outmaneuvers her tails and flies underneath London into The Shadows. Ellie makes a small mistake and ends up crashing in the Thames which is now a giant, stinking floodplain. She sinks to the bottom with the thought that she is going to be buried alive in the black muck that was once the famous river. To her consternation and relief, Ellie is "rescued" by Gorman and brought back to her prison in space.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By genoa golf VINE VOICE on February 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a fast-paced sci-fi book for youth. It is easy to read, and the language used is really good. It tells about separated twins who were trying to find each other, saving the world in the process.
My son liked the book, devoured it in just two days, and after reading it myself, I would also recommend it for other children.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. Lee on March 29, 2012
Format: Hardcover
As a mother who screens everything her 12-going-on-13-year-old daughter reads, I was getting a tad tired of the post-apocalyptic fables that followed the success of "The Hunger Games." Then, I came across "The Roar." Actually, I stumbled upon its sequel "The Whisper" first - and passed it by, based on the jacket description. When said daughter insisted on borrowing it from the library, I dragged my feet reading it - but by the second page of "The Whisper", I was hooked. I stopped reading "The Whisper", went back to the library and snatched up "The Roar."

I saw "The Roar" as a hybrid between "The Mysterious Benedict Society", "The Hunger Games", "X-Men" (was that a book, ever?!) and the 1970s show "Fantasy Island." Clayton's writing was vivid and to-the-point; the characters were well-fleshed out; the plot was pretty seamless. I would put this series and the "Dark Life" series (previously reviewed) as next up for film adaptation if the thirst for futuristic movies continues. WHY IS IT NOT ON KINDLE?! Yep, sometimes said daughter does know better! Her review follows:

"The book, `The Roar', by Emma Clayton, is an adventurous, thrilling book about what happens when everything you know about the world is wrong. The book is set in the future, where everyone is scared of animals because animals have the Plague. Therefore, everyone lives in crowded apartments on one side of the Wall, and on the other side of the Wall is barren desert, where the animals used to live.

"Mika knows that his twin sister, Ellie, is still alive - even though the police say that she died over a year ago.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Astro 599 on June 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I have to say that I liked this book, right up until the last page. It ended on such a strange, abrupt note that I was shocked when I turned the page and there was nothing there. I don't know if there's going to be a sequel, but this ending seemed more like a cliffhanger than an ending. If it is a cliffhanger, it's a good one.

If it's not, then IMO Clayton wimped out on writing the most important part of the story. Finding out a secret is only part of the solution.

Hopefully there will be a sequel, because this book would be much better as part of a series rather than a stand alone.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Erik1988 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Rating System:
1 star = abysmal; some books deserve to be forgotten
2 star = poor; a total waste of time
3 star = good; worth the effort
4 star = very good; what writing should be
5 star = fantastic; must own it and share it with others

STORY: Mika is trying to track down his twin sister, Ellie, who he knows through some connection, isn't dead as everyone has been told. Early on we start to see how both Mika and Ellie, in different ways, are being manipulated by the powers-that-be to become pod fighter pilots for the government's own abusive desires.

CHARACTERIZATION:
Marketed for ages 9-12, the level of characterization here is enough. There is teen angst and other stereotyping that pre-teens will identify with several characters. The problem is there isn't enough substance to warrant much development in any possible future stories.

The one thing I didn't care for was the use of "Frag!" as an F-word replacement. I personally don't think this is needed in a pre-teen book, plus its been done with Battlestar Galactica ("Frak!") and Farscape ("Frell!")

PLOT:
Some interesting twists, but with a heavy handedness on predictable plot. This wouldn't have been much of an issue if parts didn't seem to drag on, while other parts we want to see more of were too brief. I think this is simply an experience thing on the author's part and as she writes more stories she'll get a better feel for which parts of the drama need more center-stage time.

ACTION:
My personal bias is many female authors focus on relationships even during an action scene. I appreciated the author giving enough umph! with the action chase scenes to make us feel like something was happenings vs.
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