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The Rogue Crew: A Tale of Redwall Hardcover – May 3, 2011


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The Rogue Crew: A Tale of Redwall + The Sable Quean: A Tale from Redwall + Doomwyte: A Novel of Redwall (Redwall)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Series: Redwall (Book 22)
  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Philomel; 1 edition (May 3, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399254161
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399254161
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.3 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #116,011 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"For satisfying swashbuckling, this Redwall saga delivers, with a ride-into-the-sunset conclusion."--The Horn Book

"All of the late Jacques’ signature elements are here . . . Readers will savor this last, wonderful adventure, in which, once again, justice and Redwall prevail. It is with great sadness that we all raise a mug of Nut Brown Ale to a master storyteller who has left us too soon."--Booklist

"The multi-stranded plot demands attentive reading . . . an immersive experience."--Kirkus Reviews
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

"I sometimes think it ironic for an ex-seaman, longshoreman, truck driver, policeman, bus driver, etc., to find success writing children's novels," says Brian Jacques (pronounced "Jakes"). Yet it is all too true. With the publication of his first children's book in 1987, the award-winning Redwall, Jacques' fresh talent has received exceptional praise from reviewers in the United States and England. Newbery Award winner Lloyd Alexander called it "a fine work, literate, witty, filled with the excitement of genuine storytelling. Young people will surely be captivated. I hope they give their elders a chance to share the delights."

A well-known radio personality in his native Liverpool--as well as an actor, stand-up comic, and playwright--Brian Jacques is the host of "Jakestown" on BBC Radio Merseyside. Ever the performer, Jacques is well-known for applying his acting and entertainment background to his lively presentations to legions of young fans at schools across the United States and England.

Brian Jacques was born in Liverpool, England on June 15th, 1939. Along with forty percent of the population of Liverpool, his ancestral roots are in Ireland, County Cork to be exact.

He grew up in the area around the Liverpool docks. His interest in adventure stories began at an early age with reading the books of: Daniel Defoe, Sir Henry Rider Haggard, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Thomas Malory, Robert Michael Ballantyne, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and Kenneth Grahame. He attended St. John's School, an inner city school that had its playground on the roof. On his first day at St. John's, at the age of ten, he had an experience that marked his potential as a writer. When given an assignment of writing a story about animals, he wrote about the bird that cleaned a crocodile's teeth. The teacher could not, and would not, believe that a ten year old could write that well. When young Brian refused to falsely say that he had copied the story, he was caned as "a liar". He had always loved to write, but it was only then, that he realized that he had a talent for writing.

Some teachers at St. John's proved to be good role models. As Mr. Jacques recalls:

"My favourite teacher was Mr. Austin Thomas. He looked like Lee Marvin. Big Man. A Captain in World War II. He came to school on a big bush bike with the haversack on back. He was a man's man. Always fair. I was fourteen at the time when Mr. Thomas introduced the class to poetry and Greek literature. (Because of him, I saved seven shillings and sixpence to buy The Iliad and The Odyssey at this dusty used book shop.)"

This interest in poetry extended to Wordsworth, Tennyson, and Goldsmith. It was also at St. John's that Brian met a teacher, Alan Durband (who also taught two Beatles, Paul McCartney and George Harrison), who, more than thirty years later would bring about a major change in his life.

After Brian finished school at fifteen, he set out to find adventure as a merchant seaman. He travelled to many far away ports, including New York, Valparaiso, San Francisco, and Yokohama. Tiring of the lonely life of a sailor, he returned to Liverpool where he worked as a railway fireman, a longshoreman, a long-distance truck driver, a bus driver, a boxer, a bobby (Police Constable 216D), a postmaster, and a stand-up comic.

Penguin mourns the passing of celebrated children’s book author Brian Jacques

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

A well-known radio personality in his native Liverpool--as well as an actor, stand-up comic, and playwright--Brian Jacques (1939-2011) was the host of "Jakestown" on BBC Radio Merseyside. Ever the performer, Jacques was well-known for applying his acting and entertainment background to his lively presentations to legions of young fans at schools across the United States and England. Brian Jacques was born in Liverpool, England on June 15th, 1939. Along with forty percent of the population of Liverpool, his ancestral roots are in Ireland, County Cork to be exact. He grew up in the area around the Liverpool docks. His interest in adventure stories began at an early age with reading the books of: Daniel Defoe, Sir Henry Rider Haggard, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Thomas Malory, Robert Michael Ballantyne, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and Kenneth Grahame. He attended St. John's School, an inner city school that had its playground on the roof. On his first day at St. John's, at the age of ten, he had an experience that marked his potential as a writer. When given an assignment of writing a story about animals, he wrote about the bird that cleaned a crocodile's teeth. The teacher could not, and would not, believe that a ten year old could write that well. When young Brian refused to falsely say that he had copied the story, he was caned as "a liar". He had always loved to write, but it was only then, that he realized that he had a talent for writing. "My favourite teacher was Mr. Austin Thomas. He looked like Lee Marvin. Big Man. A Captain in World War II. He came to school on a big bush bike with the haversack on back. He was a man's man. Always fair. I was fourteen at the time when Mr. Thomas introduced the class to poetry and Greek literature. (Because of him, I saved seven shillings and sixpence to buy The Iliad and The Odyssey at this dusty used book shop.)" This interest in poetry extended to Wordsworth, Tennyson, and Goldsmith. It was also at St. John's that Brian met a teacher, Alan Durband (who also taught two Beatles, Paul McCartney and George Harrison), who, more than thirty years later would bring about a major change in his life. After Brian finished school at fifteen, he set out to find adventure as a merchant seaman. He travelled to many far away ports, including New York, Valparaiso, San Francisco, and Yokohama. Tiring of the lonely life of a sailor, he returned to Liverpool where he worked as a railway fireman, a longshoreman, a long-distance truck driver, a bus driver, a boxer, a bobby (Police Constable 216D), a postmaster, and a stand-up comic. Jacques passed away in February of 2011 at the age of 71.

Customer Reviews

He did a wonderful job of the characters being interesting.
BenT
I started reading this series when I was teaching and have enjoyed each and every book written.
Bob W. Krause
I stayed up late at night reading this book for my son Jackson wanted to read it.
Stephen C. Rees

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By ScottyBlue on May 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The diabolical Razzid Wearat (probably the nastiest, ugliest, most evil villain Jacques has ever come up with) has spent many seasons making a name for himself, torturing, killing, and raiding coastal settlements with his band of corsairs; now, the hideous mutant has acquired a unique ship - the "Greenshroud". This practical war machine is fitted with giant iron-plated wheels, so that it can sail on land as well as sea. After Razzid brutally murders four young hares to test out his new "toy", and tortures a solitary old otter to death solely for the fun of it, Lady Violet Wildstripe, the Badger Ruler of Salamandastron, sends out captain Rake Nightfur and his Long Patrol hares. Their mission; to seek out Skor Axehound and his Rogue Crew Sea Otters, the only creatures known to have opposed Razzid and lived to tell the tale. Rake and Skor must form an alliance of all their fighting beasts, and seek out the "Greenshroud", before much more damage can be done by the Wearat and his bloodthirsty crew.

However, Razzid has captured two young hedgehogs, who inadvertently tell him of Redwall Abbey, a place of plenty populated by simple woodlanders. Thinking it would be nice to rule this Abbey, and take its inhabitants as slaves, Razzid sets a course through Mossflower Woods towards Redwall. The two hedgehogs, however, manage to outwit Razzid's not-too-bright crew, and escape into the woods, where they meet up with a tribe of Guosim Shrews. The little band heads towards Redwall to warn Abbot Thibb and his creatures of the impending danger.

By this time, Skor and Rake have formed the alliance.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By KidsReads on June 8, 2011
Format: Hardcover
It was commonly believed that the despised Razzid Wearat had died in the last battle with the mighty sea otters. His injuries would have killed a lesser beast, but over time and with deadly determination, Razzid's scared body begins to heal. His injuries make him a ghastly sight, and his mind makes him an even scarier enemy:

He had lost both ears, and his head was a mass of shining scar tissue, minus its fur. One of his eyes was slitted, half shut and leaking. But there was no mistaking the brutal face and the barbarous stance. It really was Razzid Wearat.

Razzid now commands a completely refurbished ship called Greenshroud. With its giant sails and added wheels, it can easily transverse both sea and land. It doesn't matter what or who they might find along the way; if it serves Razzid to kill them, he does. If he wants something they have, he takes it. If he thinks they might be more clever than he --- which means any crew members --- they are good as dead. Razzid is a Wearat bent on destruction and power.

So when Razzid and his crew leave four young hares mangled and dead along with an old otter they had tortured to death, the Long Patrol hares are sent out to find Skor Axehound and his Rogue Crew Sea Otters. The Rogue Crew are the only ones who have been able to beat Razzid, and they are more than ready to help avenge the deaths of the poor beasts. They well know what a formidable enemy the murderous Wearat is.

For the time being, Razzid has his eyes on the capture of Redwall Abbey. From one of the little hedgehogs (Uggo) he catches, he learns that the Abbey is a place of plenty. He knows this will be a perfect place for him to take the inhabitants captive and enjoy the fruits of their famous cellars.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By The Figment Review on May 8, 2011
Format: Hardcover
by Evan Rindler

The staple of Brian Jacques Redwall series has always been a shamelessly straightforward version of adventure. The villains are cruel and ambitiously evil, while the woodland folk are kind but determined to keep their peaceful way of life, even if it means a war. Jacques uses animals for characters, and you can predict their demeanors by their species, an element of symbolism that is very easy to understand.

The Rogue Crew, completed shortly before the prolific author's death earlier this year, may be the last book in the series. Jacques died while writing Pondicherry, and it is unknown if it will be published posthumously. However, whether or not there is another tale in the saga, The Rogue Crew exemplifies Jacque's classic style.

The title refers to a group of war-hardened otters from the High North Coast who are the only hope of defeating the feared Razzid Wearat, a bloodthirsty pirate with a secret weapon: a ship that can traverse both land and sea! The perspective is split among several groups, which is used to create suspense when the audience knows what the characters do not. There are many twists and turns on the way to a predictable, but entertaining, conclusion. If the book falters, it falters where the series has; at this point, the formula has been well-tread and, while the individual characters are charismatic, the plot feels hackneyed. I wish that the narrative was more complex than the traditional good and evil story, and closer to the first books of the series which charted out a complex history.

By the same token, what the book does best is what the series has always done best. The descriptions of nature and landscapes are poetic and epic in scale.
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