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The Rough Guide Rock: The Definitive Guide to More than 1200 Artists and Bands (3rd Edition: Expanded and Completely Revised) Paperback – November 20, 2003


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Paperback, November 20, 2003
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1232 pages
  • Publisher: Rough Guides; 3rd edition (November 20, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843531054
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843531050
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.7 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #696,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Compact discs make great gifts--they're easy to wrap, they won't break the bank (depending on how many you buy), and everyone loves music. Rough Guide's rock encyclopedia contains a thousand plus entries covering every phase of rock, from R&B through punk and soul to hip-hop. It's also great to browse, with more interesting details about Little Richard and the Everly Brothers than you ever would have thought to ask. Included are career biographies of more than 1,000 bands and artists, with more than 5,000 CD recommendations. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Sexy, all-conquering guide with big, brash entries written by opinionated maniacs" The Guardian "Unafraid to stick its neck out for the sake of passion" Q magazine "Indispensable, better than ever. Indispensable." The Independent

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "jcs@ga.unc.edu" on February 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
The real strength of this book is the in-depth writing by knowledgeable fans who appreciate the music but who are also reasonably objective about the merits of individual albums. It is a welcome contrast to the Rolling Stone guides that offer the sometimes curt opinions of a handful of critics. Coverage is given to a number of British and European artists, such as Canterbury and Krautrock groups (you'll find Dagmar Krause here but not Bob Seger), that some American readers may find obscure but enlightening. Any guide that gives two full pages to Robert Wyatt (as well as two more to his former group Soft Machine) is OK by me. Be sure to check out the mock-serious Spinal Tap entry.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David Group on December 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
I own the 1996 edition, and recommend this book with some reservations. While I learned about a lot of bands I never would have heard of otherwise (draining my bank account as a result), there does seem to be a bias toward newer artists, particularly British (perhaps they could have included Wanda Jackson?). Also, there is a definite tendency toward artists who have yet to prove themselves in the long run (Alanis Morissette???) or artists of questionable merit (Meatloaf?). It is interesting to compare this book to the Trouser Press review guide, as their opinions are sometimes diametrically opposed to each other regarding specific albums.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Todd Hawley on May 2, 2001
Format: Paperback
I've looked through lots of "rock history" books over the years. What makes this one different is that it was truly a joint venture by hundreds of different people and done mostly over the Internet. While most bios were done by fans, they still maintain objectivity. They aren't afraid to comment on a specific band's strengths and weaknesses and where a band did something great or not so great. They also give accurate bios of virtually every group that did or still does exist. Not only that, this book chronicles histories of hundreds and hundreds of bands, and not just the most popular ones, but also a lot of the more obscure bands around. While there are a few groups (mostly ones that are extremely obscure) not listed here, the books' editors took great pains to include as many essential bands as humanly possible. As for the ones missing, well there's always the next edition to include them in.
Indispensable for any serious rock music fan's library.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By mianfei on October 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
After the 1991 Rolling Stone Album Guide and Robert Christgau's 1980s guide, "The Rough Guide to Rock" was in my early days as a music reader my most important source of information.

In my early days of reading it, I felt that it did not possess the ability to justify its choices as well as Rolling Stone's guides did (though I now know I was fitting my own experiences to criticism too much) but quite quickly I found that I could learn a good deal about bands who were largely unknown to writers in Rolling Stone and even Q (which I first read in 1997). As a result, I began to take far more interest in "The Rough Guide", and over time I can say there is quite a bit to recommend it. Most especially is the amount of detail given to the critically-neglected genres of progressive rock and heavy metal, which fans of those genres will most definitely welcome and which should prove very valuable to those curious. I can in fact say this even with the omission of Slayer, one of the most important heavy metal groups, because the information on such bands as Pantera and Van der Graaf Generator is refreshing for fans or non-fans. Even for better-known bands like Genesis there is information that those without expertise on rock history are not likely to know.
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