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The Rover Hardcover – November 18, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-1117046204 ISBN-10: 1117046206

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Hardcover, November 18, 2009
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: BiblioLife (November 18, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1117046206
  • ISBN-13: 978-1117046204
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 10 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,777,761 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It is the subtilized past, through the aroma and the intuitive touches, which comes alive." --The Times Literary Supplement - London --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

From the Publisher

7 1.5-hour cassettes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Fred Camfield on February 1, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would not have know of this book had I not seen the reference in the Afterward of Dewey Lambdin's book, "H.M.S. Cockerel," which dealt with the British evacuation of Toulon in late 1793. The book was originally published in 1923, and just reissued in 1999. It was the last novel completed by Joseph Conrad. It is the tale of the sailor, Peyrol, but also of poor, mad Arlette, her parents murdered in the massacre in Toulon after the British evacuation, who roams silently about, her shifting eyes forever seeking someone. The story starts in late 1796, after the temporary British evacuation of the Mediterranean, with Peyrol's arrival in Toulon in command of a prize ship. After setting the stage for the story, events jump forward to the 1803-1805 time period when Admiral Lord Nelson was in command of a fleet blockading the port. The story has a tendency to shift from scene to scene, with some flashbacks in time that sometimes make it a little difficult to follow the sequence of events, but overall it is well written and a very good tale. It is a shift from the usual naval adventure, but fills in a part of the events taking place in that time period.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Wick Allison on October 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
Until I came across the "Heart of Oak" series I had never heard of this compelling Conrad work. The editors have plucked from obscurity a psychological drama that is beautiful in its language, haunting in its imagery, and compelling to read. A real page-turner from the master.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By R.G. (Dick) Burton on February 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
One of my favorite books of all time. Set in the period following the French revolution and war with Britain, the main character is an old salt "Peyrol" who brings home a prize ship and retires from the sea. There are hints that Peyrol's experiences at sea were more than just as a sailor but that he was a "brother of the barbary coast". The story is about Peyrol's search for place and love, something he had not experienced in his many years of roaming the seas. The book goes to the heart and is not your typical sea story but one once read will be remembered.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By nemo on October 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
I chanced upon "The Rover" after having finished all of Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin novels. It's a hard act to follow, but after reading "The Rover" one might almost think that O'Brian learned a trick or two from Conrad -- for example, how to describe a captain's state of mind and thought processes during a sea chase.
The course of events in this tale takes some unraveling. Devices employed by Conrad include flashbacks, sudden gaps in the chronologic sequence, and implied dialogue. Consequently, the book reads more like a detective novel than one of O'Brian's straightforward sea adventures. That is to say, it takes a bit of detective work to follow the story.
My only regret is that I read the introduction to this edition first; unfortunately it gives away the ending. That may be the only reason why I didn't rate this book five stars.
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