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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anastasia not as a royal figure but as a young girl.
What I liked best about this book was that, through a fictional diary kept by Anastasia Romanov, youngest daughter of the last tsar of Russia, was that is showed her not as a royal figure but just as a girl with feelings and concerns. The book begins in 1914. Twelve-year-old Anastasia and her family lead lives of luxury in an elegant palace and enjoy frequant holidays...
Published on July 1, 2000 by Rebecca Herman

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3.0 out of 5 stars Anastasia
I would recommend this book for grades 4-7, because it is a little violent during the war, but it is more relatable for, because it is a little violent during the war, but it is more relatable for middle schoolers because the main character is 13. Anastasia is a book written from the perspective of the last grand duchess, Anastasia Nikolaevna Romanov. It tells about how...
Published 5 months ago by Kathryn Mcmillan


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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anastasia not as a royal figure but as a young girl., July 1, 2000
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
What I liked best about this book was that, through a fictional diary kept by Anastasia Romanov, youngest daughter of the last tsar of Russia, was that is showed her not as a royal figure but just as a girl with feelings and concerns. The book begins in 1914. Twelve-year-old Anastasia and her family lead lives of luxury in an elegant palace and enjoy frequant holidays. Anastasia's biggest concern is learning her lessons in time. But as the years go by, and Russia becomes involved in World War I, the Russian people become increasingly dissatisfied, and in 1917, Anastasia's father is forced to abdicate, and the family is exiled to Siberia. The diary ends just two months before seventeen-year-old Anastasia and her family are executed by revolutionaries. The book, except at the very beginning, was really sad, but it brought the life the end of the Romanov dynasty and young Anastasia's final years. I highly reccomend it if you enjoyed any of the other books in this series.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another interesting Royal Diaries novel, January 13, 2001
By 
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
"Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess" was a great book that gave a much more realistic version of this young girl's life than the movies made about her!
12-year-old Anastasia has a wonderful time with her family, playing with her younger brother and father, reading her sisters' diaries, and visiting relatives. However, after her 13th birthday, her carefree life begins to change, when war breaks out with Russia. Continuing until she is almost 17, you will be amazed at the changes, generally not for the better, that take place in this teenager's life.
I really learned a lot about Anastasia, who lived not very long ago. The only thing I'd say against this book was that some years of her life were covered pretty briefly, but other than that, this first funny, and then serious novel was a great read! I'd definitely recommend it for ages 11 and up - I think this exciting book would appeal to a wide audience!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Books I've Ever Read, December 9, 2000
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
This book is captivating. Carolyn Meyer does an brilliant job capturing the drama of the tragic life of Grand Duchess Anastasia. I know a lot about Anastasia, and was very pleased with the amount of time and work she put into this book. The book does an outstanding job chronicling the downward spiral of the Romanovs reign into one of the world's worst evils; communism. I highly recommond this book to anyone with a sense of history; the story of Anastasia is one that needs to be remembered. Finally a book that is worthy of Anastasia.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, January 6, 2006
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
I recently finished reading this book, and it is now my second favorite Royal Diary book. This book begins when the Grand Duchess Anastasia is only 12 years old after a ball for the four Grand Duchesses: Olga, Tatiana, Marie, Anastasia (OTMA, as they are called in this book) and ends when Anastasia is 16 during the time of the war. This book was very interesting to read and i finished it very fast. It mentioned alot of things i hadn't known about the Romanav family, for Example, Anastasia's mother was the grand daughter of Queen Victoria of England. This book is filled with information and is great for all ages to read.

The most interesting part of this book, in my opinion, is at the end of the book when they leave for Siberia. The least interesting part of this book is probubly at the beggining, although everything in this book is great.

there are also pictures and things at the back of the book, after the story. It has a picture of "The house of special purpose", where Anastasia and her family lived there last days.

Overall, this is definetly a book you'll want to buy. It was interesting to read, much more interesting than i thought it would be, and i would definetly recomend it to anyone that wants a different book to read.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Life and Times of Anastasia, the Last Grand Duchess, January 19, 2005
By 
Erika Sorocco (Southern California, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
The year is 1914, and 12-year-old Anastasia Nicholaievna Romanov is the last Grand Duchess of Russia, having been the youngest of three sisters, and the last female born before her younger brother, Alexei. Anastasia and her family lead a very luxurious life. Have the privilege to travel to their various castles, and being able to eat lavish foods at every mealtime. The biggest concern weighing on Anastasia's mind would have to be whether or not she'll be able to complete her lessons without dying of boredom. However, as time passes, Russia becomes involved in World War I, and the people of Russia become greatly dissatisfied with how the Tsar - Anastasia's Father - is running things, and by 1917, he has abdicated the throne, and the Romanov family is exiled to Siberia, where they are treated unkindly, and guarded at all times. This is how the diary ends.

I have adored the story of ANASTASIA ever since I saw the cartoon movie years ago, and I found the effort that Carolyn Meyer put into this book marvelous. Anastasia was a young girl like all of us, who had many of the same worries that girls have today. I really enjoyed the many pages of "real" photographs of Anastasia and her family, as well as the many informational pages of the way her life truly ended. I only wish that the movie I saw had been true, and that Anastasia had lived to grow up happy and healthy, as opposed to having her life cut short by gunmen. Overall, this was a marvelous book that will satisfy anyone who is interested in the story of Anastasia, the last Grand Duchess of Russia.

Erika Sorocco

Book Review Columnist for The Community Bugle Newspaper
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!!, October 8, 2000
By 
SassyTB14 (Maryland, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
This book was absolutley wonderful!! I have always been interested in the mysterious deaths of the last of the Russian royalties, the Romanov family. This diary was an insight on further information about how this family lived, and about how the war was fought and Russia lost. It showed how much pride the Romanov's had for thier country, and how they would do anything for it. If you are a history fan like me, you will love this remake diary because it gives you clues on how Anastasia and her family lived. Also, you can make your own theory of wheather Anastasia lived the massive attack of bullets in that small room, or if she along with the rest of her family, died. I recommend this to anyone who loves history and the Romanov family mystery.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars G R E A T....B O O K.........G R E A T....S E R I E S ! !, May 21, 2009
By 
Patricia "A Reader" (Queens, New York, and Denver, Co, USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
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This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
SCHOOL, FOR SOME, HAS ALWAYS BEEN A CHORE. HISTORY CAN seem dry and
dull. Many children will ask: "What do these stories have to do with
NOW...TODAY? And royalty???? The USA is supposed to be a democracy, isn't it?"

This series, from Scolastic Press, can change children's minds around!
Focusing on female members of royalty -- from all eras, from Cleopatra
to Anastasia, (The Last Grand Duchess) -- these books show these always historic, sometimes triumphant, and sometimes tragic royal ladies as
precisely what they were -- real human beings, with faults, and virtues, just like the readers of these books!

Every book has a glorious colour cover, depicting a very realistic, and character-evoking portrait of the Royal person whose "diary" the book purports to show. Obviously, these are not actual diaries, but an acute and realistic novelization of what such a "diary" could have been like.
(In some of the other volumes, in fact, this fact is printed on one of the beginning pages.) But in all the books, the "giveaway" that this
is actually the novelized, (or novella-ized) work of author, is given by the "by......." followed by the author's name, either on the cover, or on the inside title page.

The volume I now possess is: "Anastasia, The Last Grand Duchess", by
Carolyn Meyer. Ms. Meyer does an admirable job of describing the splendour of the Russian Court, as seen by the Czar's youngest daughter, Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaievna Romanov. Starting with observations about a ball, continuing with a wedding, a trip on the Royal Yacht, ((actual HOME-MOVIES of which, can be seen on YouTube to this day!)), descriptions of famous and not so famous people and events, all from the viewpoint of this very perceptive 13-17 year old, are desried in one or a few paragraphs, all diary-like. One really does get "inside the head" of the fictionalized Anastasia Romanov, reading this book. Plus -- it's an excellent book for those who, having watched TV all their lives, find their attention-span decimated by having commercials breaking up the story, every 15 minutes or so. In this book --and, I suspect, in all the other "diaries", as well -- these "bite size", diary-entries make for easy, (and exciting!) reading!

The "diary" ends, as the Royal Family leave their next-to-last place of imprisonment, to go to their (unknowingly) last imprisonment home, in Ekatrinaberg, Siberia. At the end of the "Diary" section, there is an "Epilog", stating in detail what happened to Anastasia and the rest of the Imperial family, after the end of the diary. There follows a short, but very detailed "Historical Note", describing in easily understood language, the heart-wrenching facts that led up to the Imperial Family's murders. A family tree -- starting with Alexander III, and Louis IV, Grand Duke of Hess, and their spouses, (Anastasia's grandparents), and their generation and offspring, through several generations, (including the most recent death -- in 1979! -- of a not-so-distant cousin, Lord Mountbattan of Burma, (also, strangely, killed by an assassin), ends with DIRECT descndnts of Alexander III and Louis IV, Grand Duke of Hess -- the Czar's five children, all born in different years, but all, tragically, dying in 1918. (The youngest, Czarivich Alexei, was only 14 years old when he died.)

Folling the Family Tree is are brief descriptions of the principle people on this tree. From this, we learn that Anastasia was her grandmother's favourite grandchild, and that her elder sister, Grand Duchess Tatiana, was her mother's favourite companion.

Following this is a nice selection of 20 photographs, showing not only the Imperial Family, but the palaces -- and Siberian prison -- where they lived. A picture of Rasputin, ((hisssss!)), a St. Petersberg street scene, an Imperial Easter Egg, and the Royal Yacht, 'Standart', are also shown....as well as the July, 1998 ceremony, re-buring the remains of the Russian Imperial Famly, attended by Boris Yeltson, and his wife.....

A 1-page explaination of the Russian Language, and a two-page explaination of the Russian Julian Calendar, and how it is different from, and co-existed with, the Gregorian Calendar, used in most of the Western world, is also given.

There follows a 4 page listing, with one or two line descriptions, of every historical personage mentioned in the "diary" -- including "Jim", one of two American black men, who had jobs as door-keepers of the Czar!

The life of the author, Carolyn Meyer, is described on the next two pages. Acknowledgements for the cover painting, (a truly regal, yet tellingly personal portrait of Anastasia), by Tim O'Brien, and for the sources of the photographs, previously mentioned, follows. A page listing the other books in the Royal Diaries series, (only 5, when my copy was printed....but now, happily added to!), follows, and on the last page, copyright, abd deducatu("For Patricia Clark Smith"), information is given -- along with the caveat: "While Royal Diaries are based on real royal figures, and actual historical events, some situations and people in this book are fictional, created by the author."

Happily, also -- as in the best old books -- a description of the typefaces used is also given: 'Longfellow' for display type, and 'Augereau' for the text. (('Fontaholics', such as myself, truly appreciate this information being given!)) The book has beautiful, patterned endpapers, and what must be a gold-foil simulation of the real gold, used on many diaries in the past...and even a few, right now. The binding is VERY good -- and is the very best I have ever seen, outside of really old and/or expensive books, which are sewn by hand in signatures, which costs of producing this book at its modest price, obviously prohibited. But -- a very, very good binding, nonetheless!

I suspect that the "Royal Diary" series was inspired by both the Walt Disney "The Princess Diary" movie series, (and the books that inspired them), and, perhaps, also "The Diary of Anne Frank". A diary is always intriguing, after all, no matter who has written it. And a diary written by a Royal personage, perhaps even more so. Anyone who can learn a great deal by finishing this easily read, omtriguing, totally involving book.

On the "FrozenTears.com" website, which is devoted to the Romanovs and their senseless killing, one lady -- obviously a cousin to the murdered Romanovs -- has written, simply and eloquently: "I wish I had known my family". In this book, we come not just to know the Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaievna Romanov -- but every person with whom she came into contact, during her brief life. How sad that we can know the Romanovs, now, only though books, photographs, and a few historic films. As I have commented on YouTube, "If, someday, someone invents a Time-Machine, please go back to 1900 and warn the Romanovs!" In the meantime, we are fortunate to have the photographs, the historic film clips -- and books such as this one, which bring the last Imperial Russian Family, (last, that is, as of this writing!), vividly, realistically, and poignantly, to life!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Book, June 23, 2002
A Kid's Review
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
I read this book several months ago. I thought it was perfectly great! It's about the youngest of Czar Nicholas's daughters. WWI is starting and Russia starts fighting. The Czar has to go to war, and Anastasia is left at the palace, wondering how long the war will go on. Then, her brother Alexei gets sick and the family tries to hide what happened. Several years later, The Czarina's advisor Rasputin dies and the Czar abdicates. The family is arrested, and they wonder what will happen to them as they get sent from place to place. The diary ends here, and afterwards they are killed. I really loved this book. I am Russian and was born in Russia, so I understood everything. Also I like history and this is about the history of my country. This was one of my favorite Royal Diaries. I really think people should read it!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The last duchess of Russia tells her story..., February 20, 2006
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
Anastasia's account of the last few years before her family's execution is very accurate, while seemingly that of a twelve year old girl.

She is the daughter of the Tsar of Russia, with three sisters, Olga, Maria, and Tatiana, and a very sickly young brother, Alexi.The country is clearly going into troublesome times. Much is known about the period of history in which the last Tsar and his family were executed.

But the account hardly comes from the young girl herself.

And interesting depiction of the day-to-day life of the last Grand Duchess of Russia.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anastasia, the last grand duchess, May 7, 2001
By 
dancin'devil (a small town in the middle of no where) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 (Hardcover)
Anastasia had a pretty simple life until her father gave up the throne. In this book, I found things out about her that I never knew. It shows how she related to her older sisters and younger brother, how she dealt with the Russian revolution, to how she hoped that her life would be different as she got older, to showing that she really was her grandmother's favorite grandaughter, just like in the movie. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good read and a ride through the times of the Russian revolution lead by the youngest daughter of the tsar.
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The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914
The Royal Diaries: Anastasia: The Last Grand Duchess, Russia, 1914 by Carolyn Meyer (Hardcover - September 1, 2000)
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