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The Rule of Four Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Unabridged edition (September 13, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743540298
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743540292
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 5.1 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,226 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,662,274 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Caldwell and Thomason's intriguing intellectual suspense novel stars four brainy roommates at Princeton, two of whom have links to a mysterious 15th-century manuscript, the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. This rare text (a real book) contains embedded codes revealing the location of a buried Roman treasure. Comparisons to The Da Vinci Code are inevitable, but Caldwell and Thomason's book is the more cerebral-and better written-of the two: think Dan Brown by way of Donna Tartt and Umberto Eco. The four seniors are Tom Sullivan, Paul Harris, Charlie Freeman and Gil Rankin. Tom, the narrator, is the son of a Renaissance scholar who spent his life studying the ancient book, "an encyclopedia masquerading as a novel, a dissertation on everything from architecture to zoology." The manuscript is also an endless source of fascination for Paul, who sees it as "a siren, a fetching song on a distant shore, all claws and clutches in person. You court her at your risk." This debut novel's range of topics almost rivals the Hypnerotomachia's itself, including etymology, Renaissance art and architecture, Princeton eating clubs, friendship, steganography (riddles) and self-interpreting manuscripts. It's a complicated, intricate and sometimes difficult read, but that's the point and the pleasure. There are murders, romances, dangers and detection, and by the end the heroes are in a race not only to solve the puzzle, but also to stay alive. Readers might be tempted to buy their own copy of the Hypnerotomachia and have a go at the puzzle. After all, Caldwell and Thomason have done most of the heavy deciphering-all that's left is to solve the final riddle, head for Rome and start digging.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School–A compelling modern thriller that cleverly combines history and mystery. When four Princeton seniors begin the Easter weekend, they are more concerned with their plans for the next year and an upcoming dance than with a 500-year-old literary mystery. But by the end of the holiday, two people are dead, two of the students are injured, and one has disappeared. These events, blended with Renaissance history, code breaking, acrostics, sleuthing, and personal discovery, move the story along at a rapid pace. Tom Sullivan, the narrator, tells of his late father's and then a roommate's obsession with the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, a 15th-century "novel" that has long puzzled scholars. Paul has built his senior thesis on an unpopular theory posited by Tom's father–that the author was an upper-class Roman rather than a monk–and has come close to proving it. While much of the material on the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili is arcane and specialized, it is clearly explained and its puzzles are truly puzzling, while the present-day action is compelling enough to keep teens reading. There is a love interest for Tom and a lively portrayal of Princeton life. This novel will appeal to readers of Dan Brown's TheDa Vinci Code (Doubleday, 2003) but it supplies a lot more food for thought, even including some salacious woodcuts from the original book as well as coded excerpts and their solutions.–Susan H. Woodcock, Fairfax County Public Library, Chantilly, VA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

I too found this book to be rather boring.
D. Louie
The authors show some real brains with the ideas for code, and knowledge of history, but they have no grasp of what makes a book enjoyable or interesting.
A.
I do have to say that I finished the book, although it was one of those "this just has to get better" quests that went unfulfilled.
P. G. Jones

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 67 people found the following review helpful By C. Bell on March 26, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I went to Princeton, and the only aspects of this book that I found worthwhile were its oft-evocative descriptions of my alma mater. (Though, for the record, I'd like to state that it's not very accurate in its depiction of the undergraduate experience.) I can't imagine what anyone without fond memories of the university would see in this poorly-written and poorly-plotted novel.

My main complaint, I think, is with the self-consciousness and artificiality of the prose. The book reads as if its authors are trying to show off their creativity and intellectual prowess. Unfortunately, the resulting text contains awkwardly-structured sentences and laughable similes (a book "spread open on the floor with its spine broken, like a butterfly somebody stepped on"; "a good graduate program can smell indecision like a dog can smell fear"). The writing is such that you can't get lost in the story, for you always feel the authors' presence.

It doesn't help that the characters are flat and not even remotely believable, and that it is utterly lacking in suspense--odd, that, in a novel billed as a thriller. Both problems are largely a result of the structure of the book, which relies on frequent flashbacks to develop the psychology of the characters and explain the strangely powerful hold a Renaissance-era manuscript, the Hypnerotomachia, has over them. The technique of revealing details about the personalities of characters through flashbacks can be a very useful one, but here it falls flat, simply because nothing important is ever revealed.

Still, I might have forgiven _The Rule of Four_'s vapid prose, poor pacing, and undeveloped characters if there had been a compelling case made for the seemingly-supernatural significance of the Hypnerotomachia. Alas, nothing ever comes of it. It isn't often that I regret having read a book, but this one really was a waste of time.
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61 of 70 people found the following review helpful By ZMoney on March 28, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book was written in a style of older fiction and you could tell the authors were trying was to hard to do so. Never have I seen so many classic literature references in one book. It was like the authors were trying to prove they were well educated. The story was also very boring....no action mainly just character developement for characters that I never really cared about. Don't be fooled by the comparisons to Dan Brown because these guys are nowhere near him. The only similar thing about them is that the book they were researching in the story was old...thats about it. Don't waste your time on this one.
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101 of 119 people found the following review helpful By L. E. Weyts on February 24, 2008
Format: Kindle Edition
I love books.
Many different kinds of books.
I have over 600 of them & they are all my friends that I sometimes revisit when the mood strikes me.
Some I was not thrilled with, but I could at least see what the author was going for.
For me to give away a book is unheard of.
I gave away "The Rule Of Four" as soon as I finished reading it, which took me longer than usual because it was so BORING & INANE!

My mother has a great word to describe this book: "Discombobulated"!
The premise of the book sounds intriguing, but the delivery is choppy,
sophmoric, & greatly lacking!
Just when I thought it was heating up, it went off in a completely different direction, bringing any hope of excitement or consistency to a grinding halt!
Example: One of their friends takes a swan dive from a building-Was he pushed or did he kill himself?--
"My God! He's DEAD!"
Takes a breath..."So....What are YOU wearing to the party?"
(Well, maybe not EXACTLY like that but very close!)
Reading this book gave me that feeling you get when you have to sneeze but CAN'T!

If they wanted to write a book about life at Princeton & their socialistic "eating clubs" they should have just gone ahead & written it!
Then maybe all these peeps who say that they recalled fond memories of their own college years would have been happy. The End. Bye-Bye, now.
Instead, they attempted to promote it as a thriller (THEIR word, not MINE!)& threw in a murder or 2 in order to lure many of us into buying it!

I greatly disagree with those that call it "intellectual", "cerebral", "thrilling"...It is NONE of these!
It is pompous, self-serving, & boring!
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81 of 95 people found the following review helpful By M. Detlefsen on April 20, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The premise was interesting, but the characters were lifeless for me. I didn't care about any of them. There was way too much about college life and not enough about the so-called mystery, although if they had stuck to the mystery the book would have been a fraction of the length. If the mystery/suspense aspect hadn't been hyped so much, I wouldn't have bought this in the first place. I have many books that I read and re-read mainly because I enjoy the quality of writing and the characterizations, but this certainly isn't one of them.

The choice of writing in the first person present tense was curious. This works for short stories, but I think this book shows why it doesn't work for novels, at least for me. It made it very difficult to get past the reading process and into the story. I can generally get lost in a story and forget I'm reading, but not with this one.

I rarely get rid of books (I have 3700+ around the house), but this one is headed for Goodwill or Half Price.
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59 of 68 people found the following review helpful By K. Olson on September 9, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is possible the worst written book I have every read. I am not even sure why I read the whole book. Its kind of like a train wreck, you just can't look away. Do yourself a favor and save your time and money. If you do own a copy send it back to the publisher.
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