The Rules Of Hell
 
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The Rules Of Hell

July 22, 2008

$23.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
Neon Knights
3:53
2
Children Of The Sea
5:34
3
Lady Evil
4:26
4
Heaven And Hell
6:59
5
Wishing Well
4:07
6
Die Young
4:45
7
Walk Away
4:25
8
Lonely Is The Word
5:51
9
Turn Up The Night
3:42
10
Voodoo
4:32
11
The Sign Of The Southern Cross
7:47
12
E5150
2:51
13
The Mob Rules
3:15
14
Country Girl
4:02
15
Slipping Away
3:46
16
Falling Off The Edge Of The World
5:03
17
Over And Over
5:29
18
E5150 [Live Evil Album Version]
2:22
19
Neon Knights [Live Evil Album Version]
4:36
20
N.I.B. [Live Evil Album Version]
5:08
21
Children Of The Sea [Live Evil Album Version]
6:08
22
Voodoo [Live Evil Album Version]
5:57
23
Black Sabbath [Live Evil Album Version]
8:38
24
War Pigs [Live Evil Album Version]
9:19
25
Iron Man [Live Evil Album Version]
7:19
26
The Mob Rules [Live Evil Album Version]
4:12
27
Heaven And Hell [Live Evil Album Version]
11:58
28
The Sign Of The Southern Cross / Heaven And Hell [Live Evil Album Version]
7:15
29
Paranoid [Live Evil Album Version]
3:46
30
Children Of The Grave [Live Evil Album Version]
5:25
31
Fluff [Live Evil Album Version]
1:11
32
Computer God
6:14
33
After All [The Dead]
5:41
34
TV Crimes
4:02
35
Letter From Earth
4:16
36
Master Of Insanity
5:55
37
Time Machine
4:15
38
Sins Of The Father
4:46
39
Too Late
6:54
40
I
5:13
41
Buried Alive
4:53
42
Time Machine (Wayne's World Version)
4:18
43
The Devil Cried
6:01
44
Shadow Of The Wind
5:40
45
Ear In The Wall
4:04


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 3, 2008
  • Release Date: June 3, 2008
  • Label: Rhino/Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 2008 Rhino Entertainment Comapny, a Warner Music Group Company
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 3:55:53
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001CDI76I
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #17,600 Paid in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 Paid in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

The over all remastering is great.
Steven Wilson
Now...as much as I love the music, I still think this could have been handled a lot better.
Bill M.
On Heaven and Hell alone, I would call these songs some of Sabbath's best of any era.
Tim

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Taylor T. Carlson VINE VOICE on July 22, 2008
Format: Audio CD
When Ozzy Osbourne parted ways with Black Sabbath (or got fired, depending on who you ask), his bandmates weren't ready to throw in the towel. Recruiting former Rainbow singer Ronnie James Dio, the group continued to record. What resulted were some of the band's sessions. This set compiles the band's Dio-era efforts (the ones from 1980-1992, anyway.) Additionally, all tracks have been given remastering treatment.

Here's what you get in the box set:

-Heaven and Hell (1980)
The first Black Sabbath studio album to feature Ronnie James Dio, and the last to feature Bill Ward until his return to the band in 1983 for the Ian Gillan-fronted Born Again. This is Dio Sabbath at their finest, and arguably the best material included in this set. A number of classic cuts came from this release, including Neon Knights, Lady Evil, and the iconic title track.

-Mob Rules (1981)
First Black Sabbath album to feature Vinnie Appice on drums. The follow-up to Heaven and Hell isn't quite the classic that album was, but it's still got its share of excellent songs, including Turn Up the Night, The Sign of the Southern Cross, and the title track.

-Live Evil (1982)
This live album was recorded during the Mob Rules tour. In addition to featuring a plethora of excellent songs from the two aforementioned albums you get in this set, Dio puts his own spin on sone of the old tracks from the Ozzy era. It's a great live album, but disputes between band members led to Dio and Appice parting ways with Iommi and Butler (Dio went on to form his own group, which featured Appice on drums in its initial lineup.
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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Justin G. TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 13, 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Length: 2:42 Mins
I thought people might want to see exactly what's in this essential box set.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Bill M. on August 1, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Contrary to popular belief, Black Sabbath didn't break-up when Osbourne was fired in 1979. They carried on with another 15 years' worth of albums -- longer than their first time with Ozzy -- and even saw an initial INCREASE in their sales and concert attendance compared to their slump in the late 70s. And the success of the Iommi/Butler/Dio/Appice reunion under the name "Heaven and Hell" has proven that plenty of fans still love the Dio years. So here comes the follow-up to the Ozzy years "Black Box" box set: "The Rules of Hell". As it damn well should, because the "Dio Years" single disc compilation just isn't enough! As bassist Geezer Butler explained in a recent interview, the title is simply a play on the first two albums, "Heaven and Hell" and "Mob Rules".

This set contains the four Black Sabbath albums fronted by Ronnie James Dio: Heaven and Hell (1980), Mob Rules (1981), Live Evil (1982) and Dehumanizer (1992). All have been remastered and include new liner notes. "Heaven and Hell" includes some great art work that I've never seen. It was also in the biggest need of mastering, and the new disc sounds great. "Live Evil", which Castle Records edited down from 2 discs to 1 disc at some point (taking out the audience cheers and band talk in between tracks etc.), is now back in its 2 disc entirety. I won't go into detail about these four classic albums themselves. You can find plenty of reviews on them on Amazon.

Some quick history: Dio left Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow in the late 70s, and joined Black Sabbath to make "Heaven and Hell", produced by famous metal album producer Martin Birch. Original drummer Bill Ward left mid-tour and was replaced by Vinny Appice (younger brother of Carmine). They then recorded "Mob Rules".
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tim on November 11, 2009
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
I had received an Amazon gift card and was kind of stuck on what to buy with it.

Back in 1980, I was first exposed to Black Sabbath by my older cousins and older brother. I was barely old enough to even reach the record player. The power that came from the single channel speaker was unlike anything I had ever heard. It's funny how fast things change. The Sabbath I knew had this really ominous song called Black Sabbath and there was this other one that had what a 5-7 year old kid heard as an evil, robotic voice called Iron Man.

The mid-80s approached, I was still not a huge music fan. I was still under 10 and didn't have my own money to buy albums with. I mainly listened to whatever my brother did. He was the prototype or stereotype, depending on your angle, metal head. He had an older Camaro and always played Ozzy solo, the original Sabbath line-up, AC/DC and Judas Priest. Somewhere in the mid-80s, I'm assuming probably 1985, I took on a few lawn mowing jobs in the summer, to buy myself a Nintendo. I bought the Nintendo, but I also bought a few albums too. One was Iron Maiden's Number of the Beast and the other was Black Sabbath Mob Rules.

It was like metal blasphemy! My brother and cousins all looked at me as if I had betrayed the sacred book of metal. Admittedly, the cover art for the Iron Maiden album got my attention and just the name, Black Sabbath, was still fresh in my head. Well, my brother refused to listen to Mob Rules. In all of his coolness, he was being a punk and I don't mean anarchy punk. "If it's not Ozzy, it ain't Sabbath". I still aggravate him about that though he is well into his 40s now.

He eventually "accidentally" heard my Mob Rules album playing back in 1985. He kind of liked it.
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