The Runaway Bride: Hollywood Romantic Comedy of the 1930s and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.95
  • Save: $3.45 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Runaway Bride: Hollyw... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Slategray Books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very good condition with light to moderate wear. Does not include dust jacket.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Runaway Bride: Hollywood Romantic Comedy of the 1930s Paperback – February 18, 2002


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.50
$11.50 $0.01

I Know You Think You Know It All
"Great Gifts for Grads"
Get your grad the gift of advice and observations to get them started in the working world with I Know You Think You Know It All. Learn more | More gifts for grads
$15.50 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Runaway Bride: Hollywood Romantic Comedy of the 1930s + Romantic Comedy in Hollywood: From Lubitsch to Sturges
Price for both: $37.83

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace
"William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace"
Join us, good gentles, for a merry reimagining of Star Wars: Episode 1 as only Shakespeare could have written it. Learn more | More in Humor and Entertainment

Product Details

  • Paperback: 312 pages
  • Publisher: Cooper Square Press; 1st Cooper Square Press ed edition (February 18, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0815411995
  • ISBN-13: 978-0815411994
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,680,649 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Such movie directors as Frank Capra, George Stevens and Preston Sturges attempted to portray romance from a woman's point of view; It Happened One Night and Mr. Deeds Goes to Town are examples of their now-classic formula. "Depression-era romantic film comedies starring Jean Arthur, Claudette Colbert . . . and Barbara Stanwyck are enthrallingly appraised here," said PW. Photos.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From Library Journal

Kendall's 1990 volume examines the screwball comedies that flourished during the 1930s as a means of countering the harsh realities of the Great Depression. Many of those films featured women either married or betrothed who revolt against the men in their lives, with their stories at the core of such hits as It Happened One Night, The Awful Truth, and other Hollywood gold. The text is supported by numerous monochrome portraits of the stars and some behind-the-scenes shots.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
57%
4 star
43%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 7 customer reviews
This book is a tremendous amount of fun, especially if you watch the movies as you read the book.
S. Smith-Peter
And the chapter on my favorite screwball comedienne, Jean Arthur, and the wonderful Myrna Loy, like the others, is noteworthy for its clarity, contrast, and precision.
R. Bono
Witty, engaging, and intelligent without lapsing into jargon-studded academic verbiage or theoretical pretention.
Scott Ross

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. Churchland on June 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Elizabeth Kendall's book analyzes a very specific and short-lived period of classic hollywood movies, coinciding in large part with the great depression. Many of the great movies of this era are notable for the strong, nuanced and mature representation of women that they portray, as distinct from films that came both before and after. Kendall explains this as a product of both the individuals (directors and actors) involved in forming these movies, and the effect the prevailing social conditions had on audience taste. Among the films that Kendall discusses in detail are 'Ladies of Leisure', 'It happened one night', 'Alice Adams', 'Swing Time', 'Mr Deeds goes to Town', 'My Man Godfrey', 'Stage Door', 'The Awful Truth', 'Love Affair', 'Penny Serenade', 'The Lady Eve' and 'The Palm Beach Story'. This is an interesting and thought provoking read about a wonderful period of movies, and it gave me some great ideas of movies I have not seen to seek out.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Glen Engel Cox on January 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
Ever since the Battelle Film Club's showing of Preston Sturges' The Palm Beach Story, I've been on a screwball kick. Screenplays, biographies, non-fiction, what-have-you about that lunatic genre of film greatly interest me. This book by Kendall isn't solely about screwball, but rather an overview of the larger film genre that it falls under, the romantic comedy. Sturges is only the last chapter here. The majority of director coverage goes to Frank Capra and Leo McCarey, and the book goes even more into the lives of the major actresses of the period, Barbara Stanwyck, Katherine Hepburn, Ginger Rogers, and Claudette Colbert, who the author asserts were co-creaters of the classic romantic comedy films. The argument goes like this: due to the depression and the unusual success of particular directors (men, and I use the term correctly in this case, who were able to fulfill the cathartic needs of the public going through this rough period), these directors were given extremely free reign. They used it to explore collaborations with their favorite subjects, these independent women. Movies before and after delegated women more to the supporting roles (with notable exceptions, but only as exceptions), but in these romantic comedies of the 30s the women were the lead and often the most sympathetic and fleshed-out characters.</p>

While the descriptions of the making of the movies was quite interesting, it is the concise biographies of the people involved--directors, actors, actresses, and writers--that help you understand this moment in cinema history. An excellent book on its subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By David Fiore on April 25, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is an extremely well-thought out book that should be just as interesting to a film scholar as to the casual reader. Kendall's exploration of the feminist potential in thirties romantic comedy is very assured. Biographical criticism is coming back with a vengeance (in Literary circles anyway) and the author's focus on the relationship between the directors and their female stars makes this book an ideal companion to the more textually-oriented Stanley Cavell's "Pursuits of Happiness". She chooses great movies to discuss. I particularly like her focus on the Capra-Stanwyck relationship--and I envy her for having seen "Forbidden" & "Ladies of Leisure", which I can't find anywhere!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Scott Ross on May 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
Along with Marjorie Rosen's "Popcorn Venus" and Brendan French's "On the Verge of Revolt," this is one of three superb feminist film books published in the '70s and '80s. Witty, engaging, and intelligent without lapsing into jargon-studded academic verbiage or theoretical pretention.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

I'm a Non-Fiction writer, who's explored several genres of this interestingly catchall category: narrative history, research-based memoir and a more fanciful kind of memoir. My fifth and newest book, BALANCHINE AND THE LOST MUSE, is maybe my favorite. It sent me deep into Russian archives, to find out how the great dance-maker Balanchine discovered his art, during the crazy years of the Russian revolution. And to find out if his young, gifted ballerina friend was murdered, and of so, why. I grew up in St. Louis. I live in New York City. I teach literature and writing to the very interesting students of Eugene Lang College of New School -in Greenwich Village.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: beginning modern dance book

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Runaway Bride: Hollywood Romantic Comedy of the 1930s
This item: The Runaway Bride: Hollywood Romantic Comedy of the 1930s
Price: $15.50
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com