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The Sacred Table: Creating a Jewish Food Ethic (Ccar Challenge and Change) Paperback – February 28, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Ccar Challenge and Change
  • Paperback: 564 pages
  • Publisher: CCAR Press (February 28, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881231703
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881231700
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 9.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #673,515 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By trilingual1946 on April 8, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Written from the Reform (Progressive) Jewish perspective, this thoughtful volume explores the traditions of kashrut and modern ethical concerns about food and food production. The numerous essays cover many topics, all focusing on the sacredness and holiness of food, food production, cooking and eating -- daily activities that can link us more closely to the divine. This is not an effort to create or impose a standardized Reform version of kashrut. Rather, the book seeks to provide background, history, information and resources so that individuals can develop their own forms of spiritual and ritual observances about food in a conscientious way. The essays survey the origins and bases of traditional kashrut, the history of kosher observance in the Reform movement (including discussion of the famous treifah banquet of the late 1800s which still has repercussions today), and ethical issues of modern kashrut and food production, including issues of cruelty to animals and the treatment of agricultural and food processing workers. This useful book will spark endless discussions and reflection, which is its purpose. Highly recommended for anyone interested in the spiritual and ethical issues raised by our need to nourish ourselves!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. T. Ormsbee on July 7, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My title says it all. The content of the book is first rate: thoughtful, challenging, insightful, provocative. But the publisher really does not understand how ebooks work or the ebook market. The formatting is off; TOC doesn't work; text runs lines and over sections and paragraphs. This was, at best, a lazy way to get the book on Kindle. The publisher really owes its readers better care and quality in producing an ebook.

For the book's contents, I give it five stars.

But do not buy this on Kindle until the Publisher corrects and formats the book, and takes as much care with it's epublication as it did with the print version. Buy the book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Read it for a synagogue class 'Food & Spirituality'. Found it incredibly interesting also as a Registered Dietitian having worked with numerous cultures and the meaning of food to each.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 27, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is NOT another book on keeping Kosher. Not only did I use it during adult education classes, but have gone back to the beginning and found it infinity fascinating. The history and ethics involved is something that should be of interest to a wide audience, no just for Jewish people. It is not an orthodox book, it slanted more to the reform reader, but again, I think that anyone who is interested in the ethics of eating will find this to be an absorbing book. It includes on the ethics of treating, feeding, and, of course eating them.
What is disgusting is that several countries have attempted, and in some cases succeeded, in blocking the kosher method of dispatching animals, claiming that it is cruel; nothing could possibly be more wrong if they tried. In my opinion, it is just another type of antisemitism. Kosher and (for the moment I cannot recall the Arab name that roughly translates into the same as Kosher--fit) the Islamic slaughtering is the kindest method of killing an animal as it is nearly instantaneous death and the animal feels NO PAIN WHATSOEVER as compared to thunking them on the head to stun them, leaving many animals alive when butchers begin to cut them.
IF an animal shows any discomfort whatsoever, it is not fit for use by Judaism or Islam. A knife that is so sharp and has no nicks in it is used to cut the carotid arteries and the killing stroke has to be one continuous slice so the animal simply loses consciousness and dies; the blood is then drained out.
Again, I believe that anyone who is interested in the ethics of eating will find this book fascinating.
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