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Comment: Condition: Very good condition., Binding: Paperback / Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin / Pub. Date: 2007-04-17 Attributes: Book, 192 pp / Stock#: 2057932 (FBA) * * *This item qualifies for FREE SHIPPING and Amazon Prime programs! * * *
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The Salon Paperback – April 17, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin (April 17, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312354851
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312354855
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.9 x 6.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #561,489 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Bertozzi's long-awaited graphic novel has a brilliant, daffy premise executed with wit and flair. In the Paris of 1907, a salon of later famous Modernists—including Gertrude Stein, Georges Braque, Erik Satie and their sawed-off, potty-mouthed, frequently naked, hilariously arrogant acquaintance Pablo Picasso—discover a stash of secret blue absinthe that allows its drinkers to travel inside paintings, which may hold the key to the demonic creature who's been dismembering avant-gardists. The setting is fertile territory for speculative historical in-jokes, bawdy and action-packed set pieces—especially artistic experimentation in the tradition of its protagonists—Bertozzi plays it to the hilt. His artwork is consistently vigorous, featuring rough, lusty brush strokes, an engaging duotone color scheme that changes from scene to scene, and hilarious mock French sound effects (someone being kicked is rendered "QUIQUE"). But there's also a clever subtext to the book, about the historical moment at which a small group of associates reinvented art, music and literature by thinking intensely about how to represent space and time. Bertozzi dramatizes the origins of Cubism and its links to Gauguin's work, and even suggests how Picasso might have been influenced by comic strips, thus demonstrating the Stein salon's absolute devotion to advancing their art more strikingly than a "real" history could. (Apr.)
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About the Author

Nick Bertozzi is an award-winning cartoonist based in New York.

More About the Author

Nick Bertozzi grew up in and around Providence, Rhode Island, and lives in Queens, NY with his wife and daughters. He received a Xeric Grant and multiple Harvey Awards and Ignatz Awards forhis smart and human cartooning. He is the author of LEWIS & CLARK(First Second) a graphic novel about the Journey of Discovery; THE SALON (St Martin's Press), and the forthcoming SHACKELTON (First Second). He has also collaborated with Jason Lutes on the graphic novel HOUDINI: THE HANDCUFF KING, the first of Hyperion/CCS's cartoon-biographies. You can read his ongoing
sci-fi/fantasy cartoon, PERSIMMON CUP, for free every week at ACT-I-VATE.COM. And for the past decade he has been teaching cartooning at NYC's School of Visual Arts and has also taught at RISD and The Center for Cartoon Studies.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Samuel Wells on April 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
The Salon is a murder-mystery that portrays the most influential painters and artists of the belle epoque, including Leo and Gertrude Stein, Apollinaire, Henri Matisse, George Braque and a hilariously ribald Picasso as they follow a mysterious blue female serial killer who rips the heads from the bodies of her unfortunate avant-garde victims.

Between bouts of whoring and flashes of artistic brilliance (Braque and Picasso create Cubism while staring out the window of a moving train in the middle of the narrative), the cabal of creatives chase the mysterious murderess through their own paintings with the aid of a magic blue absinthe discovered by Paul Gaugin, who has disappeared mysteriously and is presumed dead.

The story begins when the Steins invite George Braque to their salon and induce him to swallow a draught of the potion, which sends him spinning straight into a painting by Rousseau. Absinthe in this narrative is the tool of transport to magical realms, a place where every artistic creation exists as its own complete universe.

The art is undeniably comic-based but the use of color is intruiging and the story is very well crafted. It will make a fine addition to any collection of modern absinthe-related literature.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By dave-o on July 14, 2007
Format: Paperback
Early Cubism was born out of the back-and-forth visual exploration of Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso and "The Salon" re-imagines turn of the century Paris and the players that turned art on its head as a crime drama. Think MOMA meets Paul Pope's "Heavy Liquid" meets "Law & Order". Bertozzi's own artwork is beautiful and the reserved color palette matches the tone of the story. Bertozzi's take on Picasso's "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon" on the back cover is pretty brillant as well.

The murder mystery is fun, but actually less interesting than the author's imagined conversations between Picasso and Braque as well as Gertrude and Leo Stein, Alice B. Toklas, Erik Satie, Henri Matisse and Guillaume Apollinaire. Art history was one of my favorite subjects in college, particularly Cubism and "The Salon" captures the optimistic forward-looking energy of this movement, the catalyst for every major art movement to follow.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Christina Lockstein on December 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
The Salon by Nick Bertozzi has a fascinating pretext: The artists living in Paris in 1907: Picasso, Braque, Satie, plus Gertrude Stein, are being stalked and killed off by a strange vengeful being who has the ability to pass in and out of paintings. Stein's salon serves as homebase for these painters who come together to discuss art, their current works, and engage in hedonistic behavior. A strange blue absinthe gives them the ability to jump into paintings. The story is intriguing, and the artwork occasionally striking, but I was disappointed in this book. It got a lot of wonderful reviews leading me to believe it was transcendent and more than "just" a graphic novel. I loved the discussions between Braque and Picasso about how to paint all perspectives at once, giving birth to cubism. But so much of the book focused on the baser instincts of the artists. There were far too many panels of Picasso's penis for me. Bertozzi seemed to revel in his characters' hedonism, to the detriment of the story. I expected more from this book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Hilarious and on target. If you know the history, you'll die laughing. If you don't, you'll get a head's up on the dynamics of this avant-garde crowd. Silly plot line, but all is forgiven.
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By Smitty "mudflap" Whiskers on February 29, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The art is just great. He does it in these really subtle shades, of which the main color changes every few chapters. Some parts of it are even a little racy, but I guess that's how Paris was then.
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