Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Scarlet Letter Paperback – June 23, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-1613822036 ISBN-10: 1613822030

28 New from $7.98 25 Used from $2.53 1 Collectible from $140.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.98 $2.53
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Brown (June 23, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1613822030
  • ISBN-13: 978-1613822036
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #472,417 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Leland S. Person is Professor of English at the University of Cincinnati. His is the author of Henry James and the Suspense of Masculinity, Roman Holidays: American Writers and Artists in Nineteenth-Century Italy, and Aesthetic Headaches: Women and Masculine Poetics in Poe, Melville, and Hawthorne.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Leonard Seet on May 3, 2014
Format: Paperback
The Scarlet Letter depicts the dynamics of guilt and shame in seventeenth century Massachusetts Bay Colony's Puritan society, but we may find similar forces in communities where established social norms direct members' behavior.

Hester Prynne has to wear the scarlet letter "A," a symbol of shame, for committing adultery. The town fathers seek to enforce the Puritanical code through shame and alienation from the community. But grounded in her identity, Hester stands tall and calm on the scaffold and refuses to acknowledge the power of the town fathers or of the social nrom. Throughout the novel, we see her directing her destiny: helping the sick and the poor, seeking to leave Boston with her lover, returning from Europe wearing the scarlet letter, not as a symbol of shame but one of defiance.

On the other hand, her lover, the minister Arthur Dimmesdale, avoids shame, because Hester refuses to name him, but guilt torments him so much that his health deteriorates. His guilt may have come from having an affair with Hester, though her husband is presumed dead, or from allowing her to suffer alone. Whatever the reason, the same power that Hester refuses to acknowledge crushes and ultimately destroys him. So, while Hester embodies shame without guilt, Arthur does guilt without shame. He has internalized the Puritanical system such that internal punishments may exceed any external ones.

The contrast between Hester Prynne and Arthur Dimmesdale is an interesting study in human character. While some in society respond more to external punishments, other avoid transgressions for fear of internal ones.

The Massachusetts Bay Colony, like other communities, uses both external and internal forces to direct behaviors.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By K. Lewis on January 4, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book was in great condition and he passed the class so really what more can you ask for :) The book was in great condition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Jeffrey Yen on October 31, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i love it, even though it doesn't have the intro chapter. the book looks nice and the words are big~
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I am not much of a reader, but I do not say this out of bias. Having been made to read this pile of wordy and ambiguous nonsense in my tenth grade honors english class a decade ago, I really do feel that I have to put in my two cents as well. I DO have a strong appreciation for literature written by those who have the ability to create timeless works of art that are enjoyed by readers everywhere to this day, such as Shakespeare's "Macbeth" or Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities" or Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath," all of which I have read while in high school, and enjoyed very much, so I am anything but biased.

Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," on the other hand, is the definition of how being too wordy and ambiguous can effectively take the fun out of reading something that may otherwise be interesting, even if it is for the sole purpose of trying to appreciate it on a personal level, never mind being forced to read it for english class. This book was just pure torture for me ten years ago, and just hearing about it today sends a chill down my spine. Horrible, horrible memories. If anything, this book probably makes the many students forced to read it despise english class, even if they never did before. Thank goodness I got to read "Macbeth" and "The Merchant of Venice" in senior year. Those made for quite the relief!

It must be known to school systems everywhere: DO NOT include this book in your curriculum! If it is in your curriculum, then please remove it immediately. If you really want students to appreciate great literature, this book will not help them to gain that ability. Don't say I didn't warn you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
The Scarlet Letter is not only one of my favorites among the classics, it is one of my favorites of all genres. I have a thing for Puritan literature, I admit it. And since my primary source of historical research is eighteenth century religious movements in New England... Well, I suppose it is not so difficult to imagine why I love this book, but I'd like to share a bit with you.

Personally, I believe this book to be one of the greatest explorations of guilt and how it affects not only the human spirit, but the body as well. Hester Prynne is publicly ridiculed and disdained after she bares an illegitimate child. Though forced to wear a scarlet A upon her clothes to declare to all she is in adulteress, she does so with grace, and in "humble silence." She did not attempt to hide her "shame." Nor did she reveal to any the father of her child, though he too should have bore punishment. She instead held his honor in tact, though she could have easily forced him suffer the same dishonor.

The father, Arthur Dimmesdale, did not get away with a clear conscience, however. Ravaged by grief and guilt, his mental anguish soon became actual physical problems. Enough so that, upon his death, he had nearly wasted completely away. I hate to give too much away on this, especially if you haven't actually read the book.

And Hester's husband? Oh, yes, she was married. Her husband had been away for some time, which is how the villagers knew she had committed adultery. Anyway, the husband plays perhaps the most villainous role of all. He is perhaps one of the most perfect personifications of evil in literature, in my humble opinion.

I could spend quite a while discussing this book. For the sake of time and space, I must stop here.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?