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The Science of the Dogon: Decoding the African Mystery Tradition Kindle Edition

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Length: 224 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“The Dogon creation myth reflects the nuances of cutting-edge scientific cosmology, and finally this is being recognized. A quintessential read for anyone wishing to learn the truth about this fascinating subject.” (Andrew Collins, author of From the Ashes of Angels)

The Science of the Dogon decodes the opaque symbols of Dogon creation myth with great ingenuity backed by solid scholarship. Highly recommended.”  (Ida P. Moffett, editor and copublisher of The Pale Fox)

The Science of the Dogon takes the study of the ancients to an exciting new level. Laird has cracked the visual code of the Dogon, and his explanations are thoroughly supported.”  (William Henry, author of Egypt: Stargate Discoveries video series and guest host of “Dreamland)

". . . anyone who is remotely interested in our ancient past, ancient myths and traditions, and even how religion might enter into all this, will find Scranton's work intriguing." (The Messenger, Jan 2007)

"The author makes a convincing case for some intervening force in ancient times that left extremely important clues to their existence with the prevailing natives, knowing perhaps that someday someone would be aware of their presence." (W. Ritchie Benedict, New Dawn, May-June, 2007)

"Enjoyable reading and a hands-on educational approach make this book very enjoyable. Readers will find the conclusion about the Dogon way exciting reading." (Lee Prosser, Ghostvillage.com, Aug 2007)

"The implications that are posited in Scranton's book are nothing short of earthshaking, considering that the Dogon appear to have gained these sophisticated insights through some sort of sixth sense.
" . . . The Science of the Dogon should prove to be a revolutionary force, especially with regard to integrating the Dogon cosmological vision into our own lives." (Jaye Beldo, Mysteries Magazine, Issue #18, Fall 2007)

" . . . superb scholarly book, which gives overwhelming support to the O'Brien thesis of a single benevolent advanced source for civilization." (The Golden Gate Project, Feb 2008)

"Scranton is a lucid writer who articulates both scientific and cosmological concepts exceedingly well, and is transparent in his methodology. He amply demonstrates the skill set to perform such a demanding analysis, and I hope he continues further with his work." (Eric K. Lerner, Ashè Journal, April 2009)

“The whole text reveals striking similarities between Dogon symbols and those used in both the Egyptian and Hebrew religions, with amazing implications for the history of civilization. The material is an advance on the revelations that made Robert Temple’s The Sirius Mystery an international bestseller.” (Mysteries of Sirius, October 2013)

From the Back Cover

ANCIENT MYSTERIES / AFRICAN STUDIES

“The Dogon creation myth reflects the nuances of cutting-edge scientific cosmology, and finally this is being recognized. A quintessential read for anyone wishing to learn the truth about this fascinating subject.”
--Andrew Collins, author of From the Ashes of Angels

The Dogon people of Mali, West Africa, are famous for their unique art and advanced cosmology. The Dogon’s creation story describes how the one true god, Amma, created all the matter of the universe. Interestingly, the myths that depict his creative efforts bear a striking resemblance to the modern scientific definitions of matter, beginning with the atom and continuing all the way to the vibrating threads of string theory. Furthermore, many of the Dogon words, symbols, and rituals used to describe the structure of matter are quite similar to those found in the myths of ancient Egypt and in the daily rituals of Judaism. For example, the modern scientific depiction of the unformed universe as a black hole is identical to Amma’s Egg of the Dogon and the Egyptian Benben Stone.

The Science of the Dogon offers a case-by-case comparison of Dogon descriptions and drawings to corresponding scientific definitions and diagrams from authors like Stephen Hawking and Brian Greene, then extends this analysis to the counterparts of these symbols in both the ancient Egyptian and Hebrew religions. What is ultimately revealed is the scientific basis for the language of the Egyptian hieroglyphs, which was deliberately encoded to prevent the knowledge of these concepts from falling into the hands of all but the highest members of the Egyptian priesthood. The Science of the Dogon also offers compelling new interpretations for many of the most familiar Egyptian symbols, such as the pyramid and the scarab, and presents new explanations for the origins of religiously charged words such as Jehovah and Satan.

LAIRD SCRANTON is an independent software designer who became interested in Dogon mythology and symbolism in the early 1990s. He has studied ancient myth, language, and cosmology for nearly ten years and has been a lecturer at Colgate University. He also appears in John Anthony West’s Magical Egypt DVD series. He lives in Albany, New York.

Product Details

  • File Size: 656 KB
  • Print Length: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Inner Traditions (September 22, 2006)
  • Publication Date: April 19, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004X6WMGW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #466,176 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Laird Scranton is an independent software designer from Albany, New York who writes about ancient mysteries, cosmology and language. His work includes articles published in the University of Chicago's Anthropology News academic journal, in Temple University's Encyclopedia of African Religion, and in the Vassar Quarterly Magazine. His book "The Science of the Dogon" was taught at Colgate University under the title "Hidden Meanings: A Study of the Founding Symbols of Civilization." He is featured in John Anthony West's "Magical Egypt" documentary series and in Carmen Boulter's "The Pyramid Code", a series broadcast by the Documentary Channel. He has been interviewed on a variety of radio programs around the world including Coast-to-Coast AM and Red Ice Radio in Sweden. He has presented at conferences on Ancient Mysteries including Walter Cruttenden's annual CPAK (Conference on Precession and Ancient Knowledge) Conference, the A.R.E. Mysteries Conference, and the Paradigm Symposium.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Kim Guarnaccia on October 28, 2007
Format: Paperback
The Dogon of Mali, West Africa, a civilization that existed from 10th to 13th centuries, gained prominence in recent times, primarily through Robert Temple's The Sirius Mystery, which describes their advanced knowledge of the peculiar workings of the Sirius star system. Author Laird Scranton takes Temple's research even further by showing how these people also possess advanced knowledge of everything from quantum physics to string theory.

In order to sustain the illusion of the technological and intellectual superiority of modern man, the crucial elements which make up the Dogon's world view are usually overlooked--or deliberately ignored--by mainstream anthropologists and archaeologists. The implications that are posited in Scranton's book are nothing short of earthshaking, considering that the Dogon appear to have gained these sophisticated insights through some sort of sixth sense.

Along with Jeremy Naylor's work The Cosmic Serpent, which describes indigenous peoples of South America and Australia as having direct knowledge of the workings of DNA through their visionary experiences, The Science of the Dogon should prove to be a revolutionary force, especially with regard to integrating the Dogon cosmological vision into our own lives.
Mysteries Magazine
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By SamMadHands on April 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While abed with that cough everyone had in February, I couldn't do much but watch Netflix and Hulu Plus, where I found a short but startling series called "The Pyramid Code." Now, I've always hated the Von Danikens and Ancient Aliens Guys because even if their conclusions should somehow happen to be true, they have no sense of what is and what isn't evidence, their arguments are invalid, and they can't make their predicates and subjects agree. Also, I've always felt with Zahi Hawass that to claim that extraterrestrial help was needed to build the Pyramids is to demean HUMAN intelligence. (After all, it was the Stone Age, not the Stupid Age.) But "The Pyramid Code" introduced me to geological, astronomical, mathematical, electrical, and linguistic arguments that were actually ARGUMENTS, and so fact-based they made the orthodox narrative look like fabrication. So, since I was too sick to walk to the library, I ordered this e-book and read it within a few hours, thus enjoying both an immediacy of gratification and a remarkable hypothesis which, true or not, is both entertaining and worth entertaining. I'd recommend it to anyone who prefers their spookiness backed up by facts, not by wild speculation. In fact, this particular hypothesis is always welcome at my gatherings, because he is not only entertaining, but also very civil when hanging out with hypotheses that contradict him.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful By E. Caissie on January 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
Very refreshing. This author has really done a great job in researching the FACTS! He asks all the right questions and gives alternate theories on this very unusual tribe and their beliefs and ancestory. Really makes you wonder where mankinds origins really started.
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33 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Samech Tav Pey Nun on September 4, 2007
Format: Paperback
The implications of this book are very interesting. While no one seems to mention it in the book, the Dogon tribe in Africa is simply the words No god spelled backwards. What's even more interesting is that the mythology of the Dogon is basically a model for modern science. It would seem as if someone had made up this African tribe in order to express science as being the foundation of all modern religions today. But, the Dogon really do exist. You can easily find information online about these people. So, this correspondence is actually more mysterious than people realize. It's as if the original 'teachers' set this tribe up to be discovered at some point in future, when science had advanced to a level of understanding the metaphors of the storylines. It's basically showing that the idea of a personified god figure breaks down to the simple structure of matter and of existence in general. It's suggesting that there is no God other than existence itself, in it's various forms and images. So the term Nogod is fitting for the native people that hold this key to understanding the worlds mythologies. Very interesting.
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28 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A. B. Watson on November 1, 2006
Format: Paperback
Science of the Dogon may take a central place in the libraries of ancient knowledge buffs. With tremendous clarity and humility, Laird Scranton unveils an elegant notion. It seems too deep to be fully appreciated in our time, and yet it seems crucial.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth L. Stokes on June 3, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Dogon are one of my favorite African peoples. In ancient times they had a head start in areas of social organization, agriculture and metallurgy. Their association with the horse is unusual among African tribes. Their ancient creation myths are fascinating. The author found an interesting subject and then wrote a boring academic book using ancient references to verify that the ancient Dogon had a knowledge of science, mathematics and astronomy. Some it was a little bit of a stretch. Much was read into the shape of their traditional grain storage silos, illustrated by one crude drawing and no photograph. His arguments went something like the ones the presenters on Ancient Aliens make. He failed to show how this ancient knowledge gave the Dogon an edge over other tribes or how it benefits the Dogon people today. The theories he presents are plausible, but very little applicable information can be gleaned from reading the book.
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