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The Art and Science of Negotiation Paperback – April 14, 1985

ISBN-13: 978-0674048133 ISBN-10: 067404813X Edition: Reprint

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The Art and Science of Negotiation + Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In + Getting Past No: Negotiating in Difficult Situations
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Belknap Press; Reprint edition (April 14, 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067404813X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674048133
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #313,084 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The Art and Science of Negotiation is a quantum leap forward in the state of the art...[Raiffa] employs a classroom wizard's mastery over the hypothetical question to analyze in lively case studies and problems the essential characteristics of various forms of interactive competitive bargaining. (Eric D. Green American Bar Association Journal)

Raiffa deftly weaves together case-style vignettes of negotiating situations with a few analytical threads drawn from the theory of games, decision making under uncertainty, and fair division. Written with clarity and verve while avoiding technicalities, it strikes a nice balance between analysis and anecdote. (Journal of Policy Analysis and Management)

A vigorous, pragmatic treatise on resolving disputes in the realm of human affairs with all of the rigor [Raiffa] has always displayed...Tightly written, eminently readable, and containing many usable examples, it is bound to be a valuable resource book for years to come. (Gerald Hodge Journal of the American Planning Association)

The book provides a thought-provoking and useful introduction to the complexities of negotiation and mediation...[and] fills an important niche in the literature. I expect numerous opportunities to recommend it to those seeking advice. (Alvin E. Roth Journal of Economic Literature)

[A] fascinating book...Its expositional style is also refreshing, achieving a perfect balance between academic respectability and general readability...Theory and practice are carefully intertwined throughout the book; the theory ranges from simple search models to complicated n-person zero-sum games; the practice ranges from simple hypothetical examples to complicated real-world many-country negotiations, several of which are enriched by Raiffa's own personal involvement and experience. (John D. Hey Economica)

I think that nearly anyone who has experience in negotiation and management will he surprised and pleased by the amount of insight which Raiffa's chapters will give him into the structure of problems with which he is familiar but which he understands less well than he thinks. (McGeorge Bundy)

Review

I think that nearly anyone who has experience in negotiation and management will he surprised and pleased by the amount of insight which Raiffa's chapters will give him into the structure of problems with which he is familiar but which he understands less well than he thinks. (McGeorge Bundy) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Leo P. Reilly on May 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
Howard Raiffa is a professor at Harvard Business School who has a background in game theory and competitive decision making skills. He is also affiliated with the Harvard Program on Negotiation [website]. I was first exposed to this text in a Harvard symposium on collaborative negotiation that I attended 10 years ago. Raiffa's book is a popular text for academics who are interested in negotiation skills.
In this book, Raiffa likes to distinguish between the "art" of negotiation and the "science" of negotiation. By "art of negotiation" Raiffa means dealing with the human element. By "science" Raiffa means those aspects of the negotiation process that are capable of being analyised in a fairly structured manner.
Raiffa devotes most of this book on the "science" of the subject and uses his background as a game theorist specializing in competitive decision making as the basis for a rather analytical approach to the subject. It helps, but is not necessary, if you have a background in mathematics. If you are not math literate, skip the math and focus on the conclusions and you will do fine. Like most game theorists, Raiffa is mainly interested in determining which outcomes to negotiation are optimal for both parties. Much of his analysis is based on the premise that both parties will act in an ultimately rational manner and make decisions that will be optimal for themselves. (Note to game theorists- most of Raiffa's analysis tends to focus on the various "equilibrium points" that parties have when they negotiate.)
Of course, reality is somewhat different. Real life does not lend itself easily to mathematical models. People usually act irrationally when they negotiate and it is difficult, if not impossible, to quantify human emotions with a formula.
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
Howard Raiffa is one of the few authors of negotiation related books who combines expertise in both theory and practice of negotiations. While a bit heavy-reading for the beginner, any serious student or practitioner in the art of negotiation will find this book both thought provoking and extremely useful. I highly recommend it (I give the book as a gift to many colleagues).
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 31, 1996
Format: Paperback
A must read for students of negotiation, including anyone
who is, or hopes to become, an executive. The basis of
many courses on negotiation and decision science. Raiffa
spent 30 years developing his views, and they are rock
solid. Treats the concepts of Pareto optimization and
allocation of joint gains. In one eye-opening passage, he
examines how an arbitrator might allocate $100 between a
rich man and a poor man. The range of alternatives is
mind boggling, and depressing, for it becomes clear that
here, alas,(as with atomic physics) there is no "truth."
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40 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Franco Arda on May 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
Although I admire Howard Raiffa's book Smart Choices, this book doesn't appeal me at all. I felt his approach to negotiation too theoretical and extremely difficult to apply to real life issues. As one of the other reviewers states correctly, the book is rather for students of negotiation. I do much more prefer Getting to Yes, which sets an easy framework for approaching negoatiation.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 11, 1999
Format: Paperback
While this is not a good intro into the field of negotiation analysis, Raiffa's work is indispensible for the sophisticated specialist. It takes a rigorous quantitiative approach that goes deeper on the collaborative approach set out in "folksier" books like Getting to Yes. Some readers might not follow all the math, but the good news is that the chapters are very independant of each other. If you don't get anything out of one, you will out of the next.
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