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The Science Wars: Debating Scientific Knowledge and Technology (Contemporary Issues) Paperback – February 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Contemporary Issues
  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (February 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573929948
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573929943
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #538,191 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...a compact book that should be required reading for all scientists." -- Quarterly Review of Biology, September 2003

"...key papers from both sides of the arguments in one volume...excellent primer on the sociology of science..." -- Fortean Times, November 2003

About the Author

Keith Parsons (Houston, TX), is professor of philosophy at the University of Houston, Clear Lake; the author of God and the Burden of Proof, among other books; and the editor of The Science Wars: Debating Scientific Knowledge and Technology.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By A. Scott on September 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This anthology is great. It contains many famous essays by philosophers who try to challenge science's objectivity through epistemology, metaphysics, or history (Sandra Harding, Bruno Latour, etc...). At the end of each section, a philosopher responds to the charges made within these writings. By the time you read through this book, you should have a solid understanding of the main people in "the science wars" and what their arguments are.
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3 of 13 people found the following review helpful By John C. Landon on May 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a useful collection of articles on the science wars, although it seems like the thesis has been set up for easy challenge by antithesis, and science emerges victorious once again, leviathan, heat pump, and the rest.
It seems the constructivist critique of science got off on the wrong foot and lost a sense of perspective, making the retort of science fundamentalists all too easy.
The point, or what should have been the point, is that current science cannot resolve all issues of reality, yet claims hegemony over all forms of knowledge. The science wars never go around to the main event. And it is interesting through the whole debate Darwinism remained untouched. In fact, that angle seems to have been left to the ID critics, and we have Philip Johnson's essay on science, from Reason in Balance. But a critique of scientific methodology in that form is inadequate. So one can only regret the lack of 'guts' in the progression of critics from Kuhn, to Popper, Feyerbend, and the rest. Interesting enough collection
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