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The Scriptures of Won Buddhism: A Translation of Wonbulgyo kyojon (Classics in East Asian Buddhism) Hardcover – February 28, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Kuroda Institute Classics in East Asian Buddhism
  • Hardcover: 413 pages
  • Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (February 28, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0824821858
  • ISBN-13: 978-0824821852
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,171,146 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bong-kil Chung is professor of Philosophy at Florida International University.

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mccormick on March 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Years ago when I was in college in Philadelphia I encountered Won Buddhism and an earlier translation of the teachings of their founder, Master Sotaesan. With the guidance of Rev. Bokin Kim, I was able to see how Won Buddhism presented a very well-rounded, streamlined, and practical approach to enlightenment. She also showed me the deep connections which Master Sotaesan't teachings had to Korean Buddhism which were not immediately apparent in the previous English translation of the Won Buddhist scriptures used at her temple at that time. Dr. Bongkil Chung's translation and introduction makes those connections much more apparent. And while his introduction can't replace the warm and generous spirit of Rev. Bokin Kim (who is now the academic dean of the Won Buddhist Institute in Abington, Pa) reading it certainly reminds me of all the things I learned from her and even fills in some crucial historical and doctrinal details that I had not known about before. Dr. Chung also forthrightly reveals some of the difficulties that Won Buddhism has had in defining itself as a Korean New Religion. Is it a self-sufficient teaching of Master Sotaesan, or was Sotaesan just trying to create a reformed and progressive version of Buddha Dharma? The differences between the 1943 and 1962 editions of the Korean text show that Won Buddhism has been leaning in the direction of independence from the broader Buddhist tradition, but Dr. Chung's translation of the 1943 edition shows that the original intention of Master Sotaesan may have been a renovation of Buddhism rather than a departure from it. As far as the content of the text itself, I personally feel that it is very much in keeping with the best traditions of East Asian Buddhism as well as Taoism and Neo-Confucianism.Read more ›
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By Harbinger on February 11, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I thought Won Buddhism is quite interesting religion. As a student studying meditation and buddhism stuff, this book is helping me several ways. i'm to read more~ anyway i found soooooo interesting thought of Korean religion.
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