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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A bold academic foray into a new media, August 11, 1997
By 
jcamp@ups.edu (Tacoma, Washington) - See all my reviews
Turkle's seminal text examines the social implications of our increasingly computer-suffused lives. With a strong emphasis on individual interactions with computers, this ethnography describes an emerging post-modern computer culture, and goes on to interpret it in philosophical terms. A bit utopian, very smart, acts as a bit of a pre-quel to her recent work, Life on the Screen
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A little bit of an open door., April 26, 2002
By 
frumiousb "frumiousb" (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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A classic in the field of human/computer interaction, it suffers a bit from its age (although I was delighted to read about the way children interacted with Merlin and Simon, given that I was a child who had interacted with both of the above). Children are so much more saturated with computers and computer technology than when the book was written, that I wonder how the observations will have changed.
_The Second Self_ is divided into three parts:
Part I: Growing Up with Computers: The Animation of the Machine
Part II: The New Computer Cultures: The Mechanization of the Mind
Part III: Into a New Age
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a worthy update, August 5, 2005
This review is from: The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit (Paperback)
Has it already been twenty years since the first edition of this book came out?! When it did so, it was soon regarded as a classic. The intervening years have done nothing to diminish that assessment. Turkle has updated it to form this second edition.

By and large, her analysis in 1984 proved on the mark. As computers have improved in power, and become smaller and more portable, their users tend to identify with them. And here it should be said that the cellphones of today are considered, and are indeed, computers in the context of this text. Certainly, a typical cellphone has a raw computational capacity exceeding the personal computers of 1984.

To some readers, the most puzzling thing may be why some users so identify with their computers, or half-jokingly, attribute personalities to them. There seems to be some innate urge in many people for this.

Needless to say, suppose we project out another 20 years. The trend is for more such behaviour. The sophistication and personalisation possible in those future mobile machines makes this inevitable. And this is even NOT assuming any breakthroughs in artificial intelligence, which might endow the devices with true personalities.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Priceless Early Look at Hackers with "The Right Stuff", April 7, 2000
This is "the" book that described the true origin of "hacking" as in "pushing the edge of the envelope" by writing a complex program in six lines of code instead of ten. This is a really superior piece of work about computer cultures and the people that belong to them. It is a wonderfully readable book with magnificent insights into the psychology of the young people at the bleeding edge of the computer frontier.

Update of 31 May 08 to add links:
THE HACKER CRACKDOWN: LAW AND DISORDER ON THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER
Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution
Information Payoff: The Transformation of Work in the Electronic Age
Collective Intelligence: Mankind's Emerging World in Cyberspace (Helix Books)
The Unfinished Revolution: Human-Centered Computers and What They Can Do For Us
The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom
Collective Intelligence: Creating a Prosperous World at Peace
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic - every researcher should have read!, July 11, 2001
I'm a fan of Turkle, so I just loved it. It's just one of the first deep books written about human-computer interaction.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, March 16, 2014
By 
Kieran (Fairfield, IA, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit (Paperback)
Written by someone who has an instinct about how the future will turn out to be. I used this book to write my own futurist novel. Post Singularity London, this book helped me like several others did in the same way.
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The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit
The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit by Sherry Turkle (Paperback - September 30, 2005)
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