Buy Used
$6.17
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by AZ_Fulfillment
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: [Solid Condition Paperback. Cover has wear. May contain writing/markings. May be ex-library copy. Expedited Shipping Available]
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Second Shift Paperback – Bargain Price, April 29, 2003


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, Bargain Price, April 29, 2003
$31.75 $6.17

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books

Special Offers and Product Promotions

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (April 29, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142002925
  • ASIN: B000CDG842
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #980,507 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The best discussion I have read on what must be the quintessential domestic bind of our time. -- The New York Times Book Review

About the Author

Arlie Russell Hochschild is the author of The Time Bind and most recently Global Woman, which she edited with Barbara Ehrenreich. She is a tenured professor at University of California, Berkeley.

Customer Reviews

I learned so much from reading this book.
JC
I would recommend this book to anyone thinking of getting married - it is a great thing to start a discussion with a fiance.
michele rzewski
I had to read this for a sociology class in college and am happy I did.
Lobsterfrosting

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By hestia74 on March 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
Originally published in 1989, this book is more relevant today than it was 20 years ago. The author, sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild from the University of California, compiled data about the working and household chore habits of modern two-career couples. In 17 chapters the author gives historical and individual context to what she calls "the stalled revolution" of women leaving the role of full-time housewives to become salaried workers outside the home, and compares it to the process of men leaving the family farm to look for salaried work in the factories during the height of the industrial age 200 years ago.

Opposite men who still had a wife back home to cushion the sudden change into industrialization, most women who have traded the apron for the briefcase (for professional women) or the uniform (for women working in the service industries) have not had the advantage of having someone back home to cushion their aggressive entrance into the marketplace. Somehow they have had to make ends meet, sacrificing their marriage, their children or their job. Usually the marriage goes and the sudden rise in the divorce rate since women entered the marketplace in droves seems to be evidence of it.

The author discusses the inner workings of family life of eight particular working married couples with children, and how they cope with what has come to be known as the second shift, in which women are now expected to contribute to the financial life of the family by working outside the home while at the same time they are still expected to keep doing most or all of the household chores and to take primary responsibility of the day-to-day care of the children. The author estimates that all these responsibilities result in an extra month of work per year for women compared to men.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By mwr on February 2, 2012
Format: Paperback
I read the book when it first appeared. Its one drawback is that the information doesn't hold up academically, as by one reviewer. That said, I think this should be required reading by anyone who enters marriage and wants to have a family.

When I was reading the book, it had been front page news and my husband cowered in the shadows and took on more housework than normal. I quickly told him, that he is not like those make shirkers. And never was.

My husband and I had that conversation when we were engaged. He wanted a career wife and when I raised the issue about running a home and raising children his common sense was spot on. In my years, I have heard only two people who said that marriage is a team venture, and you are reading one of them. This is where is begins. Anyone who has a profession that is that demanding really should not have children. One can balance work and home but it begins with teamwork and compromises not to mention a sense of humor. I think reading this book is very useful as a trigger for young couples to really think about choices and the makeup of their partnership.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JC on September 17, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love this book.

In THE SECOND SHIFT: WORKING PARENTS AND THE REVOLUTION AT HOME, Arlie Hochschild holds up to the light this and many other strategies by which women and men in two-career marriages juggle work pressures and family needs. Between 1980 and 1988, Hochschild and her research associates interviewed fifty couples at great length. Hochschild also observed family life in a dozen homes. At the heart of her book are the stories of eleven couples. All but two are members of the middle and upper-middle class; each couple has made decisions and developed justifying myths a bit differently. Each has its own "economy of gratitude."

Hochschild is very much interested in the interrelationships between power--perceived and actual--and bonds of human caring. Her phrase "economy of gratitude" makes reference to what is given and received as gifts between spouses and how those gifts are valued. For example, if a woman earns more money than her husband, his male pride may suffer. His willingness to bear the affront may be viewed by both as a sacrificial gift, and out of guilt and gratitude she may assume most of the household responsibilities. Hochschild found many such contorted notions of what merits gratitude among the couples she studied.

As a college-age adult, I thought I would have little reason to read a study about the struggles of working women. That is wrong. I learned so much from reading this book. Learn more about family in this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Pat on August 2, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great read. I would recommend it as a gift for girls beginning at age 14 (and every year after that, if they haven't read it). This book will scare you straight regarding the trap that American women are in. We've been bamboozled! This book is not for ladies who don't want to know the truth about what's really happening in (most) two-career American homes and families! Well written and straight to the point!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Susan R. Meyer VINE VOICE on June 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book has been reissued with a new introduction to an old and important message. "A man may work from sun to sun, but a woman's work is never done" is an adage older than any of us. Hochschild draws a bleak and accurate picture of the increasing number of women with two jobs. As the economy worsens, and as more women want to maintain their careers, this number grows. The number of men pitching in at home, Hochschild reminds us, has not grown. Women come home from work to a full set of responsibilities. Women take off for the sick child, the doctor's appointment, the school play.

Yes, some men stay home, and yes, some men do their fair share. But things cold get better. I'd like to see this as required reading in high school - let's see if we can create a new trend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?