Buy Used
$3.43
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for *FREE* super saver shipping. Amazon customer service with delivery tracking. A book that has been read but is in good condition. Very minimal damage to the cover including scuff marks, or very small tears. Binding has minimal wear, and some pages show signs of use. Occasionally these may be former library books. CD may NOT be included!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Second Shift Paperback – May, 1997


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.95 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Year-End%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 325 pages
  • Publisher: Avon Books; Reprint edition (May 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380711575
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380711574
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,383,291 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

As more women work outside the home (54% in 1986) more tensions arise within their families. In this study of two-career parents, Hochschild, professor of sociology at UC Berkeley and herself a dual-career parent, identifies as "second shift" the domestic activity that occupies parents before they go to and after they return from office or shop. Conducted from 1981-1988, her interviews with working parents with children under age six reveal the inner lives of these families. We hear from women who are lawyers, executives, word processors, garment pattern cutters--and from their husbands, baby-sitters, friends and neighbors. There is agreement as to the difficulty of both parents working full time and raising children well; however, the perceptions of which partner shoulders prime responsibility vary. Even in self-perceived egalitarian couples, inequity appears, with women generally spending much more time than men on housework and childcare. This well-researched popular sociology book is presented with style and sympathy.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

A sociological study of the two-career family. Hochschild conducted detailed interviews and home observations of 50 working couples raising children under six years of age to see how they balanced careers, household, and child-rearing tasks. The results yield no surprises. As we already know, women do the bulk of the housework and child care in addition to their outside jobs. Men contribute in varying degrees, but, in general help out less in the home. Couples are either traditional, transitional, or egalitarian, based on the way they divide these responsibilities and balance the power in their relationships. Phillip Blumstein and Pepper Schwartz's American Couples: Money, Work, Sex (LJ 10/15/83), as well as numerous articles, have told us these things already, but social science, women's studies, and public library collections may want to add this book. The extensive bibliography is quite useful.
- Barbara M. Bibel, Oakland P.L., Cal.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Arlie Russell Hochschild's most recent book The Outsourced Self: Intimate Life in Market Times, explores the many ways in which the market enters our modern lives. It looks at how we both turn to the market as a source of much needed help and also how we try to protect ourselves from the implicit emotional detachment it can involve. The book has been reviewed in The New York Times Book Review and was excerpted - "The Outsourced Self" - in the Sunday New York Times "Review" Section.

Her other books include: The Managed Heart, The Second Shift, The Time Bind, The Commercialization of Intimate Life, The Unexpected Community and the co-edited Global Woman: nannies, maids and sex workers in the new economy. In reviewing the Second Shift (reissues in 2012 with a new Afterword) Robert Kuttner noted her "subtlety of insights" and "graceful seemless narrative" and called it the "best discussion I have read of what must be the quintessential domestic bind of our time." Newsweek's Laura Shapiro described the Time Bind as "groundbreaking." In awarding Hochschild the Jesse Bernard Award, the American Sociological Association citation observed her "creative genius for framing questions and lines of insight, often condensed into memorable, paradigm-shifting words and phrases." A retired U.C. Berkeley professor of sociology, she lives with her husband, the writer Adam Hochschild in Berkeley, California.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Phil_D on February 23, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a college-age male, one might think that I would have little reason to read a study about the struggles of working women. That is wrong.
This insightful, modest study of family life (witnessed by the capable Arlie Hochschild as a fly-on-the-wall) gives perspective on a dillemma everyone should think about before marriage: how to reconcile economic and personal needs with having children. This problem affects women and men, mothers and fathers.
Unfortunately, it is rarely talked about. People are forced to muddle through using their parents as examples, or to try to construct new strategies from scratch. Hochschild provides a useful structure for discussing the problem and avoiding the emotional and marital cost of relying on "myths." Any serious couple should be able to talk about these subjects to avoid misunderstanding and conflict.
One problem with this book is the writing - the points do not always flow together, and sometimes the sentences are simply awkward. This study is also weighted toward middle class families, though it explores others as well. Despite being over a decade old, this book is still relevant.
Well worth reading, whether you are deciding on a career, getting married, or already trying to balance both.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 20, 1998
Format: Paperback
Hochschild's book is a superb description of what so many of of us live but barely understand. She examines the demands of work in the home and outside, the gender identities that shape our feeling toward work, the goals that shape our chices and the intentions that define our commununication about responsiblity. The author validates the struggle of working women, without bashing men and talks about how to resolve the "stalled revolution" of shared responsibility both at home and in the workplace. Most importantly, Hochschild illuminates how our methods of dealing with the second shift, not the second shift itself per se, negatively impact our children.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 5, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book, which voices something that has been long silent, explains how women have been overburdened as a result of living in a world which no longer accepts part-time work. Even though women have resulted in incredible gains in the latter half of the 20th century, and have gained enfranchisement into many careers that were formerly only the domain of men, there still lurks the job of being a mother, which is NOT a part-time job. This book is highly recommended, not for only the truth and candor that it tells, but for the questions that it poses.
Dexter Fabi
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By hecfy@aol.com on December 10, 1998
Format: Paperback
If you have kids, carreer, and a husband, you must read this enlightning social probe into the lives of families just like yours. You will feel 'comfort' knowing that you are not alone if you are feeling crazy, anxious, or overwhelmed. Before you quit your job, or think of having another child.....Read this!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 39 people found the following review helpful By "luckyjen" on June 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
Probably a first of its kind study about families with two-working parents. However, the writing is poor, redundant and cliched. The cases she presents don't suggest much variability except income and ethnicity. Additionally, she skimps on a serious evaluation of what would make a successful household with two working parents and instead leaves us with the overwhelming feeling that success is almost impossible.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?