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The Secret Blog of Raisin Rodriguez Hardcover – April 21, 2005


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 9
  • Hardcover: 202 pages
  • Publisher: Razorbill; 1st Printing edition (April 21, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595140182
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595140180
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,124,454 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-8–The front copy promises "fits of uncontrollable laughter," but this chick-lit entry fails to deliver. Moving from California to Philadelphia and entering seventh grade in a new school, Raisin deplores the results of her mother's marriage to "Horse Ass," or Horace. She admires people for their looks and clothes, fails to appreciate her only acquaintance as a patient prince of a guy, and generally displays every obnoxious middle school characteristic imaginable. Recounting events through the blog to her buddies back home in Berkeley, Raisin details every embarrassing and thoughtless idea she has ever had, specializing in a long description of her travails on the arrival of her first period. This is actually the best part of the book, and updates "that Margaret person" whom Raisin thinks was nuts to actually look forward to this event. The inevitable denouement when everyone reads her entire blog is not surprising; nor is the fact that Raisin learns very little from the whole experience. There are better, funnier, and more realistic tales about adjusting to a new life after a parent's divorce. Shallow, very shallow.–Carol A. Edwards, Douglas County Libraries, Castle Rock, CO
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 6-9. Lost and lonely when she moves in with her stepfather's family in Philadelphia, Raisin Rodriguez, 13, talks on her blog to her two best friends back in Berkeley, California. Her daily, sometimes hourly, narrative is frank, needy, hilarious, intimate, and crude. On one level it's the usual diary about the new kid trying to fit in with the cool group. But Raisin, who admits she's way beyond Judy Blume, also writes about examining her intimate body parts, comparing what she sees with the wrinkled "face of Mervis the librarian." There's also the teacher who looks as if he has "pubic hair coming out of his ears." When she forgets to log out at school, someone prints her blog for all to read. Blogs tend to be ephemeral, but what will last here is the close-up of peer cruelty, personal intimacy, and public embarrassment. Raisin can't help wondering if the word embarrassment comes from the root words bare and ass. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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I think this book is hilarious.
Merridelian
What's more, she insisted that I read the read the book so we could talk about it.
FBC
This was a cute teen story and it read very quickly.
impossible girl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By FBC on March 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I bought The Secret Blog of Raisin Rodriguez for my close friend's 10-year old daughter, Molly. Molly is the kind of kid you think knows more about being ten than you do about being 40+, precocious, razor sharp and eating up more knowledge and truth about the world with each passing day. I honestly worried that I could not find a book good and wise enough for her.

After she read the book, Molly called me that very day to tell me what she thought of it. She was so over-the-top crazy about the book, speaking a mile-a-minute, that I knew it couldn't have been her parents that put her up to it -- she really was in love with the book. What's more, she insisted that I read the read the book so we could talk about it. She even did something which I think few children have ever done - she gave me back my gift just so I could read the book - what truer endorsement could there be?

And so I decided to spend an afternoon with Raisin..... Problem was, my overly-affectionate dog sometimes makes it very difficult for me to read anything at home, not to mention the lure of 227 channels and a perennially overflowing email Inbox. Still...I promised Molly and wanted to see for myself what this book has to offer.

So off I went to my local Starbucks for a good sit-down with Raisin. I must admit that at first I took pains to carefully shield the cover, as my Chicago neighborhood is stuffed to the brim with `concerned parents' in sensible shoes on the lookout for any signs of peculiar behavior from fellows of my demographic. This is, after all, a book primarily intended for "tweener" girls.....And I am at the opposite end of the scale in all respects.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Cody on November 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book is delightfully funny! It may be written for the 10 and up age group, but I've reached the ripe old age of 40 and this book had me rolling around in hysterics. Raisin's blog-eyed view of the world provides a perfect venue for this story with its roundly developed characters and razor-sharp wit. I write for this age group myself, and read tons of young adult novels - this is one of the few I'm immediately passing on to my own daughter. Raisin Rocks!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca C. on May 20, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I loved this book! Raisin is so funny and real and could definitely be one of my friends. More Raisin books please!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By L. Cognato on April 29, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I love this book! I teach middle school english and ever since I read the advance copy and then gave it to students, it's been flying off of my classroom library shelf! It's an updated, hip version of "Are You There God, It's Me, Margaret," and the way it's written makes it really accessible to kids!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I'm ten years old and read a lot of books (I read 3 books in the first 3 days of spring vacation). I like reading all types of books including fiction, which I think this is although it's so realistic it could true. I loved the Secret Blog of Raisin Rodriguez for many reasons, including the fact that Raisin is so interesting, funny and fashionable. I really relate to her sense of fashion and felt bad about all of her challenges, including her parents getting divorced, moving to a new school, leaving her friends behind and her mom making her change out of the Raisin Rodriguez Fall Line Sassy Student No. 1 outfit. Like my school, Raisin's also seems to have its collection of strange boys, like Jeremy and his talkitis and Sparkles. There is a boy at my school that likes llamas and I don't think he's ever even seen a llama. The worst was when her blog was discovered and everyone read it, I felt really bad for her. I also liked that the story was told in a blog. I can't wait to read the other Raisin Rodriguez books and have already started reading the second one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I'm ten years old and read a lot of books (I read 3 books in the first 3 days of spring vacation). I like reading all types of books including fiction, which I think this is although it's so realistic it could be true. I loved the Secret Blog of Raisin Rodriguez for many reasons, including the fact that Raisin is so interesting, funny and fashionable. I really relate to her sense of fashion and felt bad about all of her challenges, including her parents getting divorced, moving to a new school and leaving her friends behind and her mom making her change out of the Raisin Rodriguez Fall Line Sassy Student No. 1 outfit. Like my school, Raisin's also seems to have its collection of strange boys, like Jeremy and his talkitis and Sparkles. There is a boy at my school that likes llamas and I don't think he's ever even seen a llama. The worst was when her blog was discovered and everyone read it, I felt really bad for her. I also liked that the story was told in a blog instead like most other books. I can't wait to read the other Raisin Rodriguez books and have already started reading the second one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
Well, I'll have to admit, this book is funny. But, it was just so.. so airhead-y that I found I was more apt to laugh at Raisin's personality and stupidness and sertotypical teenager additude (I need a boyfriend, I need to go shopping, lyk OMG!-ness). Just out of seventh grade last year after moving from Maine to Oregon, I can assure most everyone that hardly any girl (and I pity those who are) is like this. Everyone was fine without a boyfriend and shopping and kissing hardly blipped on most people's radar. So, if you are looking for an insight to a teenager's life, skip this unless you are looking for over-the-top vulgarity (that whole Mervis issue? I'd be better off about knowing that...) and ridiculous obsessions.
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