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The Secret Founding of America: The Real Story of Freemasons, Puritans, & the Battle for The New World Paperback – Bargain Price, August 4, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Watkins (August 4, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1906787344
  • ASIN: B005IUZLGU
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,844,333 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nicholas Hagger has lectured at universities around the world; written for the London Times; and written more than 20 books of history, literature, and philosophy, including a study of the founding, rise, and fall of civilizations. He has appeared frequently on television and radio and in newspapers, speaking on the founding of America.


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Customer Reviews

Quoting as fact things that other people make up is not viable historical research.
Michael Robinson
I read 100 pages to see if there was any redeeming value and then threw the book away, I won't even give it away.
George S.
I would recommend this book to anyone who is unaware of the fact that George Washington was a Mason.
Anne Adams

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Chris N on June 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover
First, organization and style make this a difficult read. The first third is a reverse-chronology of colonial settlement, often devolving into a mere rambling rapid-fire of who killed whom where. Names and religious sects are hurled at the lost reader like an arrow barrage, sprinkled with teasers - was this player from a rival Freemason faction, etc. - long before Freemasonry's origins and stance are discussed. Hagger simply presumes you'll keep up.

Second, once he's discussed Bacon and Freemasonry, what follows is a Freemasons/elites-run-the-world version of history. Up to the Constitution, some of it's believable. An acceptable argument is made that many patriots were Freemasons and deists who believed in religious freedom vice Christianity in particular, as supported by their church practices, education, and preferences in art and literature.

Yet we're also acquainted with the layout of D.C., symbols on the dollar bill, etc., and from there things get hard to swallow. For because of the accepted degrees of secrecy in its hierarchy, supposedly even the Founding Fathers didn't grasp the true agenda: a world government, re-establishment of the Jerusalem kings, and thanks to a radical Germanic sect, worship of Satan. America was merely to be a Utopian Atlantis, strong only long enough to wipe out religion through tolerance. There's paradox and a long-term jihad-mindset everywhere.

Hagger says the Constitution is just the imprinting of the Freemason lodge system on our country, led silently (he doesn't say why) by Washington. Somehow, this uniquely equals thirteen united colonies. While the Masonic 13 supposedly figures into the U.S.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Michael Robinson on December 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
I began this book thinking the history interesting. Although the repeated comments about "possible Freemasonic faction" concerned me, since there were no records to support these "possibilities". I wondered if I was being sucked into anti-Masonic drivel. Still there was potential for some of his ideas to be accurate, though not provable. After 80 pages he made some attempts to explain these Masonic factions but drew too many conclusions not based in fact. Still, I found his early chapter on the settling of America interesting particularly concerning the Deists and the Founding Fathers. At this stage of his work when he quoted Paine, Franklin, Washington, Jefferson ect, the sources actually pointed to things these men said. The book is plausible in many ways until we reach page 128 and the German Illuminati. He quotes Weishaupt concerning nationalism and its ills, and the quote seems to have come from Weishaupt and was a really good point. After this he quotes the nefarious plots of Weishaupt, (at which point I started checking his sources as I thought it odd that Weishaupt would have written down his secret plans and left them where they could be found) from here on every terrible offense supposedly committed by the Freemasons, whether direct quotes or otherwise are primarily sourced from 3 conspiracy writers (Still, Rivera and Daniel), when you don't count the times he quotes himself. Now Hagger moves deeper into fantasy and I began to wonder if anything he had written thus far was accurate. When Hagger begins to quote Pike, again we find that he is not actually quoting Pike but these other "authors" (I use the term loosely).Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul Clark on May 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
I really wanted to like this book. And I enjoyed it---but won't reccomend it!

The author ended up writing a conspiracy book---not a history. Many of the facts were interesting and valuable. But then he would affirm something as a fact, that I knew for certian had been disproved time and again. I'd wondered, with this sloppy scholarship, how could I trust the rest of the book, if I wasn't already familiar with the facts? It's okay to theorize, but you owe it to your readers to let them in on it -- not affirm it as fact and hope they won't notice it. Too bad, because it's primary thesis is worthwhile. This country was founded on enlightenment values and by Freemasons!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Anne Adams on June 5, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I would recommend this book to anyone who is unaware of the fact that George Washington was a Mason. Freemasons were heavily involved in the founding of America and were also involved in the founding of the cities and towns across this nation, even after the Revolution. Taking advantage of their secret society allowed the Masons to do behind the scenes political work which was needed. However, the author's main point is that the Masons were against the Puritans and Christianity. I don't think he substantiated that point. The undermining of the Puritans was mostly done by the Unitarian Sect which was active and illegal in this country until Washington allowed them to worship openly. If the author would have connected the Masons to the Unitarians, he would have shined the light of truth on a conspiracy. As it is, I have to wonder if the real conspiracy isn't that the historians manage to overlook the Unitarians and their hand in the demise of Puritanism in this country and their continued anti-Christian activities.
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