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The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture Paperback – August 28, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Sentinel Trade; Reprint edition (August 28, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595230971
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595230973
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (246 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #46,581 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A Manichean analysis from a strident new voice from the Right---for liberals, something intended to ignite antagonism; for the like-minded, a buttress against the opposition." ---Kirkus --This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.

About the Author

David Mamet is an acclaimed playwright, screenwriter, film director, and essayist whose many works include the Academy Award –nominated film Wag the Dog and the Pulitzer Prize–winning play Glengarry Glen Ross.

Johnny Heller has narrated some five hundred books and garnered a bunch of swell awards and accolades, including Publishers Weekly Listen-Up Awards, Audie Awards and nominations, AudioFile Earphones Awards, and selection as one of AudioFile magazine's Top 50 Narrators of the 20th Century. --This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.

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Customer Reviews

A very well written book.
joanna
One can only hope that his courage will inspire others who have been living lives of lies for all too long.
Reader in Palo Alto
By the way, this economic reason for marriage/family is why gay marriage isn't okay.
Daniel Cunningham

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

401 of 443 people found the following review helpful By Andre on June 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The great irony that arrived on my iPad (via Kindle) with David Mamet's excellent book is that, as the dramatic authority of confidence games (e.g., House of Games, The Spanish Prisoner), for most of his life he was taken in by the confidence game of modern Liberalism. (Born and raised in Chicago, he still got conned.) Mamet is erudite, literary, and incisive in this set of linked essays. I rarely use the Kindle's highlight function, but I found myself highlighting more passages in the first third of his book than all 260 of the other books I have read on Kindle. His writing is that great. He resides in that specialized domain of an H. L. Mencken, or a Richard Mitchell (whose Underground Grammarian and several books are available free on the Web). He draws from Hayek and Sowell, among others, but is more fun to read. Here are some of my favorite highlights:

Chap. 1: "We cannot live without trade. A society can neither advance nor improve without excess of disposable income. This excess can only be amassed through the production of goods and services necessary or attractive to the mass. A financial system which allows this leads to inequality; one that does not leads to mass starvation."

Chap 2: "I will now quote two Chicago writers on the subject, the first, William Shakespeare, who wrote 'Truth's a dog must to kennel; he must be whipped out, when Lady the brach may stand by the fire and stink'; the second, Ernest Hemingway, 'Call 'em like you see'em and to hell with it.'"

Chap 3: "The grave error of multiculturalism is the assumption that reason can modify a process which has taken place without reason, and with inputs astronomically greater than those reason might provide.
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504 of 570 people found the following review helpful By Sandy Winnich on June 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover
David Mamet made a stir in 2008 with his Village Voice essay, "Why I Am No Longer a Brain-Dead Liberal." This book is a fuller, wittier, and more scathing treatment of the same subject--a liberal screenwriter who has "seen the light."

Like other big media apostates, Andrew Breitbart, Tom Wolfe, John Stossel, Ben Stein, and Dennis Miller, Mamet realized the liberal assumptions that capitalism was evil and that Republicans were corporate lackeys had serious holes. When he began to investigate the logic behind free markets, he realized that it actually made sense. As Mamet puts it, modern liberalism is nothing more than a religion that its practitioners preach blindly on faith.

To examine the inanity of modern liberals, Mamet offers 39 entertaining essays that cover the gamut of modern living, including "Adventure Slumming," "Cabinet Spiritualism and the Car Czar," and, my favorite, "Oakton Manor and Camp Kawaga." Throughout the expose, Mamet makes use of his excellent perspective in the arts. With examples from his theater class, he shows exactly how absurd political correctness and the liberal agenda can be.

I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good story and wants to peer into the ultra-liberal New York/L.A. big media mindset. Of course, the culture wars are just a symptom of the problem, and, for anyone who wants an examination of how we got into this situation, I recommend the brilliant Juggernaut: Why the System Crushes the Only People Who Can Save It.
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98 of 107 people found the following review helpful By M. Crobar on June 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
You will have to read the book to understand "the pellet".

I started this morning (after reading half the book) by talking to a liberal friend, who at times talks as if he is conservative, but when I point that out he clams up. So, the first thing I sent him was the Wall Street Journal interview with Mamet from May 28th, to which my friend responded with "he's a sellout and been corrupted by Rupert Murdoch and FoxNews and what else would you expect in the Wall Street Journal". "...have a pellet of food."

So, I sent him the Village Voice article, and his response was Mamet has sold out for the money and become a capitalist. "...get a pellet of food."

Then I read a paragraph from the book about getting a pellet, and his response, after a bit of silence was "I don't care". He "...got the pellet".

He is clearly one of the "wouldn't it be nice if everything was nice" liberals.

One of the best things about the book, as an almost life long conservative but having arrived there through some effort, (I didn't eat the pabulum) I not only couldn't disagree with any premise or observation, but found that Mamet put some things together and drew the cause and effect picture, that I'd not thought of.

The book is extremely entertaining, and I really felt like I was watching a play. It was a comedy, a tragedy and a morality play all in one and I didn't want an intermission. I couldn't put it down. I want more! FUN!

Oh, and I pre-ordered this for delivery on the 2nd and it arrived in my Kindle on iPad at 00:10. Neat!
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314 of 355 people found the following review helpful By Alex on June 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is not the story of David Mamet's transformation from liberal to freethinker who thinks his way into conservatism. Instead this is 39 short, well-written observations from someone who has encountered conservatism with virgin eyes, like Columbus looking on the Americas for the first time. These will all be familiar to conservatives who are well aware that there are good reasons underlying conservative thought and action.

Mamet's revelations can be a little amusing to long-time conservatives, like hearing your child come home from school and saying "in Australia the seasons are reversed! Christmas is the hottest time of the year, and July 4th the coldest!"

Perhaps his best epiphany is that everything is a trade-off in life. For example, realizing that there's a very real reason why a country that can send a man to the moon can't provide free school lunches to all; because that nation chose to send a man to the moon instead. Government can some of the things we want it to do, but not all.

"All human interactions are tradeoffs, one may theoretically offer cheap health insurance to the twenty million supposedly uninsured members of our society. But at what cost-the dismantling of the health care system of the remaining three-hundred million plus? What of the inevitable reduction, shortages, abuses, delay and injustice caused by State rationing? There's a cost for everything."

Lots more insightful observations like the neo-Puritanism on the Left, for example, at his child's school, where the familiar music mnemonic of Every Good Boy Does Fine is changed to Every Good Baby Does Fine, to avoid using the masculine 'boy.
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