Buy Used
$3.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Secret Under My Skin Hardcover – February 15, 2005


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$9.99 $0.01

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTeen (February 15, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006008989X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060089894
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,342,665 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up - Set in 2368, this dystopian novel offers a glimpse of a potential future for our world. Blay lives in a work camp for homeless children, where they dig through a garbage dump to retrieve valuable items such as paper. There is not much technology left after the recent technocaust, when scientists were blamed for environmental disasters and taken to concentration camps. Due to her love of reading, Blay is chosen to help Marella, the new bio-indicator, with her studies. In the past, these individuals, whose bodies react to poisons in the environment, served as warning mechanisms for others, but now, as the Earth heals and the danger lessens, they are expected to collect and interpret scientific data. As she helps Marella pass a series of tests, Blay discovers that she has a natural talent for science. As she starts to live a more normal life, she realizes how misled she has been by the people in charge of her society. Her knowledge grows along with that of readers', building suspense and making the resolution more satisfying. Blay is a vividly rendered narrator who exposes her own emotional vulnerability, which enhances her heroism. The setting and culture of the book are equally vividly rendered, offering a depth that allows readers to believe fully in its premise. The writing is clear and crisp, evoking a magic that enchants. All of these elements make this one of the top science fiction novels in recent years. - Tasha Saecker, Caestecker Public Library, Green Lake, WI
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 6-9. McNaughton weaves an ambitious tale of a dystopian future that successfully explores many important threads: homeless children, pollution, natural history, education, and the role of science. In the year 2368, following ecological trauma and a "technocaust" that sent scientists and technicians to concentration camps, an oppressive government nurtures fear and ignorance. Now, U-R (Use-Rating) numbers indicate a citizen's value, and "bio-indicators" that monitor environmental toxin levels are revered. Blay Raytee, a young woman with a secret past and an uncertain future, is selected to assist beautiful Marrella in her preparations to become the bio-indicator for their village. Marrella's disinterest in her studies and Blay's love of reading and proclivity for learning ill suit them for their destined careers. Blay's understanding of her talents, her past, and her future unfolds in natural progression. The intriguing ideas, infusion of poetry, and hopeful conclusion more than compensate for a few weaknesses in plot and dialogue. The scarcity of introductory sf for middle-school readers makes this vision of the future, originally published in Canada, a must purchase. Cindy Dobrez
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Emily Hawkins on February 20, 2005
Format: Hardcover
It's always a shock when you find what you've believed since you were young is not what everyone else in your community believes to be true. Blay Raytee can't remember her parents or where she was from. She was placed in a government-run orphan work camp where they learn how technology users are evil and have to die in order for prosperity to return to the earth. She is afraid to go outside without a protective radiation suit. Things all change when she is chosen by the "bio-indicator" to be her assistant as she prepares for her trials. Blay begins to learn how different the world is from what she was taught in the work camp. She is drawn into a secret world as well as learns how to love for the first time. She also grows to understand her own value and her own hidden secrets. If you like "The Giver" by Lois Lowry, then you should enjoy this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Farah Mendlesohn on March 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
Really good science fiction for teenagers is rare. It tends to be based on idiot science and have a subliminal message that the only important thing in life is family.
Janet McNaughton's The Secret Under My Skin falls into neither trap. Set in the far future, on an ecologically degraded earth, the politics are scary and the heroes real people. No soppy earth mothers, no great destinies, just hard work and human ingenuity. I loved this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Farah Mendlesohn on March 3, 2004
Format: Paperback
Set in the far future in a world wrecked by exploitation, there is no airy fairy mysticism, just sensible plotting and an attempt to get to grips with scientific and technological possibilities in poor circumstances.
Well written and really compelling characters.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on May 17, 2007
Format: Paperback
Imagine yourself in the near future. You don't know where your parents are, or who you truly are. If you can picture that, you can picture Blay Raytree's story. The story begins with Blay in practically a sweatshop-orphanage in the year 2368. She ggets picked out of all of the other orphans to assist a bio-indicator. While she is in the house he bio-indicator is living in, she realizes something. Whenever she runs her wrist near the kitchen scanner, it beeps. Blay asks a friend, Lem Howell, an electronics genius, to help her. They find out it is an information chip with her age (sixteen years od), real name (Which is Blake Raintree), and other important information. In return, Blake helps Lem Howell and his son, Fraser. After Lem's wife was kidnapped by the Commission, Lem went insane and was unable to care for his son, so the town took up that duty. However, when Lem recovers his sanity, he can remember everything but the birth of his son. Blake helps to reunite them, and they then decide to live together.

Blake then realizes that Marella, the bio-indicator, has to go on a task by herself, which means she wouldn't be able to use Blake's special knowledge. Because Blake worried about what would happen if Marella failed the last test. Blake runs to the Masterr and tells him everything that she has dne for Marella to help her to complete the tasks. Instead of being scolded or punished like she expected, she was praised for her knowledge and love for all things Science. After that, the book begins to wind down, and it shows the world healing from the Technocaust, the very war that caused so many children to be parentless and not know who they were, or where they came from.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search