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The Seer Hardcover – 1993


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Hardcover, 1993
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 332 pages
  • Publisher: Seagull Book & Tape; First Edition edition (1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1884529011
  • ISBN-13: 978-1884529016
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,369,731 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By P. Beehler on January 31, 2011
Format: Paperback
The Seer, by Orson Pratt and named after the Prophet Joseph Smith, is a valuable book for several different reasons. First, it is a historical. Second, it is written by an Apostle of Jesus Christ. Third, Orson never had any intention of publishing false doctrine. In all of his writings (and you need to read them in order to know for sure, which I have many times) he was always careful to acknowledge when he was giving his opinion and when scripture did not necessarily back-up what he was discussing.

Fourth, the doctinral value of The Seer is enormous. While many details are Orson's own thoughts, the doctrine of the creation, the fall, the atonement, eternal life, celestial marriage -- as far as I know -- is not set forth any where else with such comprehensiveness, clarity and train of thought. I don't necessarily agree with everything Orson has every written (nor do I of a lot of others, Parely P. Pratt being one of them) but I love The Seer for its straight-forwardness and precision in showing the importance of these doctrines. It is definitely one of my favorite and most read Church references.

Further, Orson tackles a lot of details that are completely within reason of doing so, like some of the commandments and their intention and purpose. Orson talks alot about how Adam and Eve must have felt and how to make celestial marriage (specifically, plural marriage) a relationship that fulfills its purpose. Orson is very well read himself, and even when he does speculate I at least soak it all in for consideration because of his validity and reliability in status and knowledge -- just read about his life and the addresses given at his funeral service. He never deviates from solid foundational doctrine that would contradict the Prophet he so much loved and admired.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Christopher C Jones on August 1, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Orson Pratt is one of the most controversial theologians of Mormonism in the 19th century. He was also perhaps the most learned and brilliant. Although he was later reprimanded formally by the First Presidenct of the LDS Church for a couple of views he expressed in the publication, this does not destroy the credibility of the book in helping to one understand Mormon thought in the 19th century.

Previous reviewers recommended "Jesus the Christ" by James E. Talmage instead. While this is an important book discussing the Mormon theology of Christ, it does not cover the breadth of subjects that "The Seer" does. Also, no books are officially "endorsed" by the Latter-day Saint heirarchy besides the Mormon scriptures and the monthly Church publication, "The Ensign."
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Viertel on August 29, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This book does not reflect official doctrine of the church. It was written and published independently by Orson Pratt, it was never an official church publication. Even at the time of it's publication the book did not do well, circulation peaked at only 400 copies, and Orson Pratt lamented to his brother parley "The world will not subscribe for nor read The Seer". In 1865, twelve years after its first publication, the first presidency officially disowned the book stating "The Seer [and other writings by Pratt] contain doctrines which we cannot sanction, and which we have felt impressed to disown, so that the Saints who now live, and who may live hereafter, may not be misled by our silence, or be left to misinterpret it. Where these objectionable works, or parts of works, are bound in volumes, or otherwise, they should be cut out and destroyed."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By indigoblu on September 6, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not what I expected, but worth the money. If you are any type of fundamentalist LDS you'll appreciate it. If you are mainstream LDS you'll burn it. I consider it an important part of my library.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful By T. Marshall on January 1, 2002
Format: Hardcover
In the churches defense Orson Pratt had a habit of getting a little out of hand with his views. If memory serves correct Brigham Young had this book banned from being printed at first because of it being controversial.
On the other hand a lot of the information is accurate to early mormon belief. Such as polygamy and the roles of man and woman in marrige but, Pratt does have a habit of elaborating and putting his own spin on early dogma a bit too much. After all he was a man of science and tried to take Joseph Smith and Brigham Youngs concepts and explain them as "scientific" as possible (like the reason for celestial marrige was so when your dead and in heaven as a god with your wives (godess's) you can mass produce enough children to populate your own planet to be judged..he then gives figures and numbers as to how long this will take and how many children will be needed).
I would approach this book with caution and view it as Orson Pratts views and not the views of the whole body of the church during that time. I would recommend reading something like 'Mormon america' or 'The Mormon experience' and get a good over all view of the church and its history before approaching these more 'sensational' books. After all you should always try to be fair..even if you don't like an organization:)
anyway I give it 3 stars for being interesting in subject matter and 0 stars for being well written (the constant referral of the body being a tabernacle is enough to drive you mad)
adios
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