The Selfish Giant 2013 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(16) IMDb 7.4/10
Available in HD
Watch Trailer

A powerful, moving story about the friendship of two young English boys. Kicked out of school, they wander with their horse selling scrap metal until catastrophe strikes.

Starring:
Conner Chapman, Shaun Thomas
Runtime:
1 hour 31 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

The Selfish Giant

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Clio Barnard
Starring Conner Chapman, Shaun Thomas
Supporting actors Ralph Ineson, Ian Burfield, Everal Walsh, Sean Gilder, Lorraine Ashbourne, Elliott Tittensor, Rebecca Manley, John Wall, Mohammed Ali, Jamie Michie, Steve Evets, Siobhan Finneran, Bailey Clapham, Jake Gibson, Sofina-Rose Hussain, Peter-Lee Lowther, Aron Ryan, Macy Shackleton
Studio Sundance Selects
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
7
3 star
0
2 star
3
1 star
0
See all 16 customer reviews
Don't say I didn't warn you.
Eric in NYC
This is simply an excellent film, director Clio Bernard - `The Arbor', has made a British realist drama with a heart and soul.
Tommy Dooley
They want to earn a living, in any way possible, even if dishonest.
Jacques COULARDEAU

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Dooley TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 31, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video
This is described as a contemporary fable and yes it is but it is a whole lot more. Set in northern England we meet Arbor, he has to take medication to control his temper, his father has left and his older brother is a drug addict who feeds his habit through petty crime. At school Arbor has a best mate in `Swifty', he comes from an impoverished background where he has numerous siblings and a loser father who spends every penny and is even reduced to selling his own furniture, but his mum sees Swifty's potential.

After an incident at school Arbor gets `excluded' or expelled as we used to call it. Swifty, who he was standing up for, gets excluded but only for a few days. With nothing or `nowt' to do they decide to make some money by working for a dodgy scrap dealer with Romany leanings. This is the strangely named `Kitten'. He is happy dealing in stolen metal and cable and even shows the kids how to avoid the Smartwater that is used as a security device. Swifty has a natural affinity with horses and loves being with them so the rag and bone horse and cart are right up his street. Little Arbor on the other hand just wants to be the next Kitten. As things get ever more desperate on the home, front for both lads, they up the ante on the work almost unaware of the dangers.

This is simply an excellent film, director Clio Bernard - `The Arbor', has made a British realist drama with a heart and soul. The young lads who are the leads are both amazing. At times it feels unscripted or more accurately `natural' and that adds to the realism. The horses or ponies all look beautiful. There is a lot of profanity and some scenes that animal lovers may be upset by, due to how the horses are treated but that should in no way detract from what is a stunning piece of cinema.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Moon Bronte on December 30, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
When there is nothing else beautiful or redeeming in life. This movie is a portrait of a bleak, hard existence warmed through with the connection between two young boys who count on each other above all others, even though they are radically different in temperament and personality. The one apparent thing they have in common is how outcast they are and their determination to help their desperate mothers by taking on the work of men, as they are left with no other options. In its roughest form and manifestation, they are trying to be the head of household their fathers are not. Watching this struggle is heartbreaking, portrayed in a story that is both poetic and painful. As in many classic portrayals depicting coming of age, the bond between humans and animals, in this case horses, is expressed and symbolized as the one thing that brings both pride and love while showing how both child and beast are exploited by all who have failed them.
This is a film that will sit within you on a lasting level.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Barrie Murphy on January 19, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
A beautiful tale of friendship amid the ugliness of everyday live. See how society treats its most vulnerable and weep.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By FFW on January 2, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video
This film was something of a little journey. The whole time I was wondering what the heck was going to happen next, whilst asking myself "Do young people in 'civilized Western countries' really live this way?" It seemed like a totally abstract fantasy world invented solely to drive the plot. If you grew up in the suburbs, or generally had a normal childhood, you'll probably feel the same way...and it grips you. Just watch it. The ending is killer.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Gordon TOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 8, 2014
Format: DVD
While not audacious and brave in it's style as Barnard's smashing debut "The Arbor", it explores much of the same territory – poverty in northern England. But this time Barnard uses a more neo-realist bent that recalls the films of Ken Loach, among others. And after two viewings, while I missed the wild rule-breaking she did in her first film, I felt she had made a film of gritty honest and emotional force.

The story centers on two young teens (very well played by non-pros). Diminutive Arbor is hyperactive, angry, and so on the edge he can be frightening and simultaneously heartbreaking -- Arbor needs meds just to allow him to be calm enough to function. And there's Swifty, his best friend who is introvert to Arbor's extreme extrovert. Swifty is willing to go along with Arbor's schemes to a point, but he also wants to honor his mother's wish that he get an education, and try to move up and out of poverty.

The two begin collecting (and sometimes stealing) scrap metal to sell to a tough local junk metal dealer, Kitten. This is a man who is capable of being almost a father figure one moment, and stomping you into the ground the next. A sort of modern Fagan, using the boys to do his bidding (although, to be fair, the boys come to him).

A dark, moody and ultimately deeply disturbing film, that refuses to let us or society off lightly when it comes to kids growing up in the cycle of poverty.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Luke on June 20, 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
SOME PEOPLE LEARN LIFE LESSONS THE HARD WAY, that being said., our main hero Arbor (emotionally challenged teen) lives in a pathologically deprived environment of rural England. He does not like school nor authority. Arbor has one friend named Swifty with whom he constantly gets into trouble and consequently gets thrown out of school. Arbor and Swifty turn into collecting and selling scrap metal to a local merchant who also deals with horse-racing (that is where Swifty comes in). The two boys bond really close, and stick up for each other until...the expected happens.

While watching this movie I could not shake off the impression that England was considered a developed country...The Selfish Giant (2013) surely shatters the image of that wealthy and prosperous James Bond's homeland. Another thing that might strike viewers, is the profound and excess use of profanity (I myself was not surprised for English crime movies are well known for its startling use of language) but here we have tween actors aging between 12-13 using the word f...as if it was their first spoken word before daddy and mommy. The ending could have been better, that is why I only give this English indie 4 solid stars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews